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Cooling solution for 9600K@ 5,0GHz

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I had an Corsair h115 i PRO AIO before I did my custom loop. It's a very good AIO but a little expensive. I never got higher than 65 degrees with my delidded Core i7 8700K@5 GHz even in Prime 95 with it.
But it's a little bit oversized, only for the CPU a 240mm rad will do the job also. I would go for the 240 rad cause you have more headroom for oc.

- The CPU is fine for gaming
- The Mobo is good for oc, plenty of VRM and good VRM cooling
- Your PSU is a little bit oversized for your system ;-) (I have an be quiet straight power 11 650W for an 8700K@OC and a RTX 2080@OC and this is sufficient)

Edit:
In my opinion water cooling outperforms air cooling. Water transfers heat better than air and you don‘t have to mount such a huge monoblock on your cpu, so it‘s also more aesthetic. My custom loop runs now for nearly one year and there was not 1ml loss. But more interesting than water cooling your CPU is water cooling your GPU. You will achieve much higher boost clocks cause Nvidia‘s Boost 4.0 has three limits which decide how far the boost goes. Temp Limit, Power Limit and Current Limit. Besides the last two ones water cooling helps getting higher temp boost clocks.
Thanks for your relevant reply. Just returned from downtown for the AIO and the PSU. I'm glad to present all the parts for my new rig:

CPU = 9600K ($253)
MOBO = Asus ROG Strix Z390-F ($228)
AIO = Corsair H100i Pro RGB ($102) (2x 120 ML series 2400rpm PWM fans)
PSU = Corsair RMi 850W ($167)
RAM = Corsair Vengeance LPX 3000MHz CL15 ($88)
M.2 = Sabrent Rocket 1TB PCIe 4.0 (recommended by Tech Deals, pity that I finally decided on Z390 instead of X570) ($20)
GPU = Asus ROG Strix RX 570 4GB Overclocked version (know this is going to be the bottleneck, maybe upgrade next year) ($189)
CASE= MasterBox MB511 ($79) (This one is the best airflow choice, it is a bit under-rated, not many reviews mention about it, it's a great case, saw it in one of Tech Deals videos about a build)

Total = $1,226. Quite an expensive build. I would possibly add AIO cooling to the GPU for better performance, I take it that it can cool down its temperature by 50%. The only trouble I will envisage to see is that the chips surrounding the GPU without the heat sink. How do you folks normally do that? Add tiny heat sinks to all of them? Where can I find good tiny heat sinks?

Now moving forward, what is the best match GPU to the i5-9600K? Possibly RX-5500?
 
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The only trouble I will envisage to see is that the chips surrounding the GPU without the heat sink. How do you folks normally do that? Add tiny heat sinks to all of them? Where can I find good tiny heat sinks?
The memory chips on the video card? You don't need to get a heatsink for them. I think you are over thinking the whole GPU cooling thing, just get a card with a good factory cooler on it.

Now moving forward, what is the best match GPU to the i5-9600K? Possibly RX-5500?
currently for 1080p 60FPS+ it would be a GTX 1660 super for about $225, that said since you will upgrading next year it's a moot point as new cards will most likely be out by then
 
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The memory chips on the video card? You don't need to get a heatink for them. I think you over thinking the whole GPU cooling thing, just get a card with a good factory cooler on it.



currently for 1080p 60FPS+ it would be a GTX 1660 super for about $225, that said since you will upgrading next year it's a moot point as new cards will most likely be out by then
True, no hurry at the prsent moment, because the 9600K + RX 570 will do a decent job for the games I play.
Next year, when RX 5500 comes out, some of these nVidia cards might drop in prices.
Actually as far as GPU goes, I prefer AMD than nVidia. Graphics look vivid on AMD cards.
 
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The only trouble I will envisage to see is that the chips surrounding the GPU without the heat sink. How do you folks normally do that? Add tiny heat sinks to all of them? Where can I find good tiny heat sinks?
You have three options water cooling your GPU:
- First is to get an AIO solution like:
Problem here is that these AIO solutions mostly only exist for the higher price cards

- Second buy a GPU with pre-installed water block like:
With this solutiobn you need a custom loop where you can insert this card but you don't have to disassemble anything on your card, it's ready to use

- Third you buy a full water block for your GPU:

With this solution you get everything to rebuild your GPU for water cooling. The full water block covers everything, the GPU itself, the VRAM and also the VRM on the card. You get thermal compound for the GPU and thermal pads for every VRM chip and every VRAM chip. You have to disassemble your air cooler and clean the PCB. Then you put thermal compound and pads on GPU, VRM and VRAM. Then you assemble the water block and insert the card in your custom loop.

There are many manufacturers like EK Water Bocks, Phanteks or Bitspower where you can buy such a water block, mostly you can reuse your backplate too or you can buy a backplate also from them. The first water blocks they build for new cards are for reference design cards, so you have the biggest selection with a reference PCB but also for other cards with non refernce PCB you will get a water block sooner or later.

I have a phanteks Glacier full water block on my RTX 2080 and in games it stays mostly below 50 degrees all the time or at max of 51/52 degrees. Show me an air cooler which can do that...
Todays cards are difficult to oc because they boost only if you are in specific temp/power/current ranges. If you exceed then it throttles. For example Nvidia with Nvidia Boost 4.0. Only if I stay in low 40 degrees I get full boost to 2055 MHz. If I reach the 50 degrees it throttles 15 MHz to 2040 MHz and so on, the hotter your GPU gets the lower your frequency, especially with Nvidia cards. So with water cooling you get higher boost clocks and better performance.

I chose Nvidia cause I wanted Raytracing, but next year AMD cards should also have this feature. I would get a card with at least 8GB VRAM and RTX cause I think there will be more games using RTX

Edit:
Lastly, a major player in any overclocking scenarios is the extra heat generated. Higher clocks often translate to higher power draw and therefore more heat. NVIDIA Turing cards are designed for normal operations up to 83 °C with the ability to raise that limit to 88 °C in 3rd party software. The actual GPU is safe up for around 90 °C, but because of how the NVIDIA Boost operates based on the three rules. Before ever exceeding 88 °C, the video card will down-clock itself. GPU temperature plays a large role in this and even if you are well within the "safe" zone, Boost may downclock the card for seemly no reason to you, the user.
This text is from https://www.overclockersclub.com/guides/nvidia_rtx_2080_oc_guide/ which explain this Boost technology.
 
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I'm running an Arctic Mono Plus VGA Cooler, it does 50 *C in Red Dead 2 and other games, with the 1060 6GB, and cost me $30, you could try one of those instead of a VGA water cooler. It shaved about -25*C off my original load temps.
 
Joined
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Messages
61 (1.97/day)
You have three options water cooling your GPU:
- First is to get an AIO solution like:
Problem here is that these AIO solutions mostly only exist for the higher price cards

- Second buy a GPU with pre-installed water block like:
With this solutiobn you need a custom loop where you can insert this card but you don't have to disassemble anything on your card, it's ready to use

- Third you buy a full water block for your GPU:

With this solution you get everything to rebuild your GPU for water cooling. The full water block covers everything, the GPU itself, the VRAM and also the VRM on the card. You get thermal compound for the GPU and thermal pads for every VRM chip and every VRAM chip. You have to disassemble your air cooler and clean the PCB. Then you put thermal compound and pads on GPU, VRM and VRAM. Then you assemble the water block and insert the card in your custom loop.

There are many manufacturers like EK Water Bocks, Phanteks or Bitspower where you can buy such a water block, mostly you can reuse your backplate too or you can buy a backplate also from them. The first water blocks they build for new cards are for reference design cards, so you have the biggest selection with a reference PCB but also for other cards with non refernce PCB you will get a water block sooner or later.

I have a phanteks Glacier full water block on my RTX 2080 and in games it stays mostly below 50 degrees all the time or at max of 51/52 degrees. Show me an air cooler which can do that...
Todays cards are difficult to oc because they boost only if you are in specific temp/power/current ranges. If you exceed then it throttles. For example Nvidia with Nvidia Boost 4.0. Only if I stay in low 40 degrees I get full boost to 2055 MHz. If I reach the 50 degrees it throttles 15 MHz to 2040 MHz and so on, the hotter your GPU gets the lower your frequency, especially with Nvidia cards. So with water cooling you get higher boost clocks and better performance.

I chose Nvidia cause I wanted Raytracing, but next year AMD cards should also have this feature. I would get a card with at least 8GB VRAM and RTX cause I think there will be more games using RTX

Edit:


This text is from https://www.overclockersclub.com/guides/nvidia_rtx_2080_oc_guide/ which explain this Boost technology.
Lovely, truly fantastic! I didn' tknow there are so many options out there. But they are rather expensive to me.
Have you heard and tried the NZXT G12 bracket here?

This is the cheapest solution yet, it seems to offer a solution to a wider range of cards. However, it doesn't look after the VRM adn VRAM and the package lacks of pads.

Where do I get those pads from? And which brand of them are good quality?

I love RayTracing! But first, I want to try this G12 thingy to see how much reduction in temp it can offer to my cheap RX 570. I heard that it can reduce 50% of heat from a fully load card.

If it works as expected, then I can buy a 5700 or 5500 next year and use the same AIO to cool it!!

I'm running an Arctic Mono Plus VGA Cooler, it does 50 *C in Red Dead 2 and other games, with the 1060 6GB, and cost me $30, you could try one of those instead of a VGA water cooler. It shaved about -25*C off my original load temps.
There seems to be two

1)
2)

Which one?
 
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No I wasn‘t aware of the Kraken mounting kit but according to this test it seems to work and make a good job:

The only downside is that you have no direct cooling of VRAM and VRM, but the 90mm air cooler makes a good job, according to the test you stay in safe zone for both. So there is no need to attach heatsinks on them

So yes this is a good possibility to get an AIO on your GPU without the need of a custom loop.
If you look for good thermal pads or liquid thermal compound give Thermal Grizzly a try.

I use Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut liquid metal paste between CPU Die and heatspreader and Thermal Grizzly Hydronaut for GPU and between heatspreader and Aqua Computer Kryos Next CPU Cooler.
 
Joined
Oct 17, 2019
Messages
61 (1.97/day)
No I wasn‘t aware of the Kraken mounting kit but according to this test it seems to work and make a good job:

The only downside is that you have no direct cooling of VRAM and VRM, but the 90mm air cooler makes a good job, according to the test you stay in safe zone for both. So there is no need to attach heatsinks on them

So yes this is a good possibility to get an AIO on your GPU without the need of a custom loop.
If you look for good thermal pads or liquid thermal compound give Thermal Grizzly a try.

I use Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut liquid metal paste between CPU Die and heatspreader and Thermal Grizzly Hydronaut for GPU and between heatspreader and Aqua Computer Kryos Next CPU Cooler.
 
Joined
Nov 6, 2019
Messages
26 (2.36/day)
Location
Nuremberg
Processor Core i7 8700K@5 GHz
Motherboard MSI Z370 Gaming Pro Carbon
Cooling 2xEKWB Rads, EKWB Reservoir 250, Aqua Computer Kryos Next CPU Cooler, Phanteks Glacier GPU Cooler
Memory 16 GB DDR4 GSkill Trident Z 3200
Video Card(s) Asus ROG STRIX RTX 2080 O8G (GPU@2115 MHz/VRAM@7800MHz)
Storage 1x Samsung Evo 840 SSD 256, 1x WD Blue 1 TB HDD
Display(s) Asus ROG Swift PG248 1080p Display/144Hz/G-Sync
Case Fractal Design R6 with Window
Audio Device(s) Realtek onboard
Power Supply be quiet 650W Straight Power
Mouse Logitech G502
Keyboard Cherry KB
Software Win 10 Pro
Benchmark Scores FireStrike: 25953/Extreme: 13141/Ultra: 7099/TimeSpy: 11426/Superposition: 7667/CinebenchR20: 3916
Yes that's the company. They are from germany and they work with overclocker der8auer if you know him.
 
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