1. Welcome to TechPowerUp Forums, Guest! Please check out our forum guidelines for info related to our community.

Dark Matter Makes Up 80% of the Universe.

Discussion in 'Science & Technology' started by 64K, Aug 6, 2014.

  1. 64K

    64K

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2014
    Messages:
    2,842 (2.83/day)
    Thanks Received:
    3,241
  2. Sasqui

    Sasqui

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    8,731 (2.17/day)
    Thanks Received:
    2,714
    Location:
    Manchester, NH
    That, my friend, is the answer they are trying to find. What is it and why does if affect gravity but seemingly nothing else?
     
    64K says thanks.
    10 Year Member at TPU Crunching for Team TPU
  3. Drone

    Drone

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2010
    Messages:
    5,346 (2.33/day)
    Thanks Received:
    5,395
    90% of all matter in Andromeda and Milky Way is dark matter
     
    64K says thanks.
  4. Sasqui

    Sasqui

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    8,731 (2.17/day)
    Thanks Received:
    2,714
    Location:
    Manchester, NH
    Here's a great article on it: http://science.nasa.gov/astrophysics/focus-areas/what-is-dark-energy/

    This is mind blowing:

    "The rest - everything on Earth, everything ever observed with all of our instruments, all normal matter - adds up to less than 5% of the Universe. Come to think of it, maybe it shouldn't be called "normal" matter at all, since it is such a small fraction of the Universe."

    In the context of e=m*c^2 (Mass and energy are different forms of the same thing):

    "One explanation for dark energy is that it is a property of space. Albert Einstein was the first person to realize that empty space is not nothing. Space has amazing properties, many of which are just beginning to be understood. The first property that Einstein discovered is that it is possible for more space to come into existence. Then one version of Einstein's gravity theory, the version that contains a cosmological constant, makes a second prediction: "empty space" can possess its own energy. Because this energy is a property of space itself, it would not be diluted as space expands. As more space comes into existence, more of this energy-of-space would appear. As a result, this form of energy would cause the Universe to expand faster and faster. Unfortunately, no one understands why the cosmological constant should even be there, much less why it would have exactly the right value to cause the observed acceleration of the Universe. "
     
    FordGT90Concept and 64K say thanks.
    10 Year Member at TPU Crunching for Team TPU
  5. SKBARON

    SKBARON

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2013
    Messages:
    224 (0.16/day)
    Thanks Received:
    89
    Location:
    Chisinau, Moldova
    I though the distribution of stuff in the universe was something like:
    5% visible matter
    about 25% dark matter
    and 70% dark energy

    Did something change for it to be 80% dark matter or was it a mistake in the article?
     
    64K says thanks.
  6. Ahhzz

    Ahhzz

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2008
    Messages:
    3,715 (1.16/day)
    Thanks Received:
    2,719
    matter=unspent energy :)
     
    64K says thanks.
  7. Sasqui

    Sasqui

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    8,731 (2.17/day)
    Thanks Received:
    2,714
    Location:
    Manchester, NH
    The NASA article says "roughly" 67% is dark energy. Close enough! :)
     
    10 Year Member at TPU Crunching for Team TPU
  8. 64K

    64K

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2014
    Messages:
    2,842 (2.83/day)
    Thanks Received:
    3,241
    The article I linked to must be wrong. I would trust the NASA article that Sasqui linked to more.
     
  9. Drone

    Drone

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2010
    Messages:
    5,346 (2.33/day)
    Thanks Received:
    5,395
    "distribution of everything in the universe" is not the same as "distribution of matter in the universe"

    everything = dark matter, dark energy, matter, energy, antimatter
    matter = dark matter, matter

    distribution of everything in the universe means 2/3 is dark matter
    distribution of matter in the universe means 80-90% is dark matter, 20-10% normal matter and antimatter
     
  10. patrico

    patrico

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2006
    Messages:
    473 (0.12/day)
    Thanks Received:
    305
    Location:
    ireland, galway
    i like to look at it as condensed energy, like matter is the water and energy is the steam, i like your take on it too :)


    we are in big holographic tv screen powered by eletrons, played by the creators and its running super sim universe13 on an open source op sys hehe :p
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2014
    64K says thanks.
    10 Year Member at TPU
  11. W1zzard

    W1zzard Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2004
    Messages:
    16,563 (3.61/day)
    Thanks Received:
    15,709
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.1847
     
    64K and patrico say thanks.
    10 Year Member at TPU
  12. Sasqui

    Sasqui

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    8,731 (2.17/day)
    Thanks Received:
    2,714
    Location:
    Manchester, NH
    64K, patrico and Ahhzz say thanks.
    10 Year Member at TPU Crunching for Team TPU
  13. Ahhzz

    Ahhzz

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2008
    Messages:
    3,715 (1.16/day)
    Thanks Received:
    2,719
    My controller keeps making me pick my nose at weird times of the day.....
     
    64K and patrico say thanks.
  14. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2008
    Messages:
    18,994 (6.37/day)
    Thanks Received:
    8,236
    Location:
    IA, USA
    We know that there's a lot of invisible debris in between solar systems in galaxies. That could account for a lot of dark matter. It is too far from any light source to be visible and too small to obstruct the view from distant light sources. The question is what is between galaxies, if anything? That space is much more vast than the space in galaxies.
     
    Crunching for Team TPU
  15. Steevo

    Steevo

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2005
    Messages:
    9,425 (2.32/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,926
    I was sold by the smiley face.


    Particle wave duality and the fact that according to its findings photon's are a mere probability wave until we observe them and collapse them into a particle that interacts would be awesome if not for the pesky trees, but perhaps they are a simulation of the probable interaction with a energetic particle given the output from calculated sources in the equation also.
     
    10 Year Member at TPU 10 Million points folded for TPU
  16. W1zzard

    W1zzard Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2004
    Messages:
    16,563 (3.61/day)
    Thanks Received:
    15,709
    If I remember correctly normal unlit matter was excluded somehow, don't remember the details.

    Space between galaxies can't account for dark matter, which has to be clumped up around the center of galaxies, so that rotational velocities of the outer stars work out properly (the underlying reason why dark matter was invented)
     
    FordGT90Concept says thanks.
    10 Year Member at TPU
  17. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2008
    Messages:
    18,994 (6.37/day)
    Thanks Received:
    8,236
    Location:
    IA, USA
    If the entire basis for dark matter is the behavior of galaxies then I say it isn't matter at all that is responsible because gravity is not responsible. Whatever establishes the parameters of a galaxy likely moves the fabric of space and time entirely as well as having immense gravity. Think of gravity as a sphere but the effect on space/time as more of a torus. Perhaps we'll learn if even medium stars like our own have its own torus effect as Voyager travels deeper into space. If it does, Voyager may be unable to leave because it is unpowered.

    It could also explain why solar systems tend to be flat as well. Perhaps the same star stuff that allows a star to be born in small quantities allows a galaxy to be born in large quantities. I never bought the idea the stars could haphazardly form out of cloud of gas. Something has to have caused the gases to coalesce otherwise why would it not form a gaseous planet like Jupiter? This same stuff is what also may make the fusion heart of a star tick. When a star dies, the same stuff is responsible for forming a new star out of the debris.

    Think a black hole but as a force of construction instead of destruction as Hawking likes to make it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2014
    Crunching for Team TPU
  18. W1zzard

    W1zzard Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2004
    Messages:
    16,563 (3.61/day)
    Thanks Received:
    15,709
    10 Year Member at TPU
  19. AphexDreamer

    AphexDreamer

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2007
    Messages:
    7,324 (2.11/day)
    Thanks Received:
    998
    Location:
    C:\Program Files (x86)\Aphexdreamer\
    So it sounds like its just space stacking within itself.

    Also I'm sure this isn't an answer, but if it weren't the right value we wouldn't be here to observe it. Since we are here, we can observe it and it happens to be just right.
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2014
  20. Drone

    Drone

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2010
    Messages:
    5,346 (2.33/day)
    Thanks Received:
    5,395
    matter / energy .. after all it's just an illusion created by strings or branes in hyperdimensions. The main hero here is the spacetime itself. It's all about resonances and vibrations sounds pervy I know
     
  21. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2008
    Messages:
    18,994 (6.37/day)
    Thanks Received:
    8,236
    Location:
    IA, USA
    Let me start over...

    "Dark energy" is on the verge of being dispelled by way of "gravitational waves." They operate by expanding space-time itself. So, if this proves true, could the astrophysics need for "dark matter" be eliminated by taking the same concept and placing an object in the center that these waves are attracted to? The further out they get, the more energetic they become up to a limit presumably established by the properties of the object in the center? It may, in fact, be the opposite: the same waves responsible for expanding the universe are being caught and decelerating as they approach the galactic core. Not very likely seeing as there doesn't seem to be any order to the orientation of galaxies. No matter how the rotation of "gravitational waves" is achieved, can they not explain the rotation of galaxies?

    Edit: Actually if you think of a black hole for gravitational waves, it pretty much fits perfectly.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2014
    Crunching for Team TPU
  22. Drone

    Drone

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2010
    Messages:
    5,346 (2.33/day)
    Thanks Received:
    5,395
    nice video

     
  23. Drone

    Drone

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2010
    Messages:
    5,346 (2.33/day)
    Thanks Received:
    5,395
  24. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2008
    Messages:
    18,994 (6.37/day)
    Thanks Received:
    8,236
    Location:
    IA, USA
    Not really. The limitations of our perspective can always skew results. It is nigh impossible to prove how skewed it is until it can be studied from a different perspective.
     
    Aquinus says thanks.
    Crunching for Team TPU
  25. mpc755

    mpc755

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2014
    Messages:
    33 (0.04/day)
    Thanks Received:
    6
    Dark matter is not a clump of stuff traveling along with the Milky Way.

    The Milky Way is moving through and displacing the dark matter.

    This is why the Milky Way's halo is lopsided.

    The displaced dark matter pushes back and exerts inward pressure toward the matter.

    Displaced dark matter pushing back and exerting inward pressure toward matter is gravity.

    What is referred to as deformed spacetime physically exists in nature as the state of displacement of the dark matter.
     
    64K says thanks.

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guest)