• We've upgraded our forums. Please post any issues/requests in this thread.

GPT does not mean a faster operating system.

Status
Not open for further replies.
Joined
Nov 11, 2014
Messages
11 (0.01/day)
Likes
1
#1
Question: Will GPT make my Windows OS run faster? No, period.

The important choice is to dump the HDD as the primary drive and move to a SATA SSD* or M.2 SSD.

One needs to migrate their OS/Programs/Content from an HDD to an SSD; then you have a super-fast computer. If migrating is not something you want to delve into then perform a new Windows 7, 8 or 10 installation onto a new SSD. Note: If it's a new installation you can copy all your personal files from the HDD to the SSD after your new installation.

What size SSD? Most gamers like to use a 500GB SSD as their primary drive and use the 1TB to 4TB HDD as their second Internal Storage Drive. If you plan on having many partitions on the HDD then use GPT if you need more than 4 partitions. If not, keep it simply and stay with MBR.

*SATA SSD is far more diversified and portable. One can use a USB3.0 Adapter Cable with any SATA SSD.
 
Last edited:

Aquinus

Resident Wat-man
Joined
Jan 28, 2012
Messages
10,398 (4.85/day)
Likes
5,477
Location
Concord, NH
System Name Kratos
Processor Intel Core i7 3930k @ 4.2Ghz
Motherboard ASUS P9X79 Deluxe
Cooling Zalman CPNS9900MAX 130mm
Memory G.Skill DDR3-2133, 16gb (4x4gb) @ 9-11-10-28-108-1T 1.65v
Video Card(s) MSI AMD Radeon R9 390 GAMING 8GB @ PCI-E 3.0
Storage 2x120Gb SATA3 Corsair Force GT Raid-0, 4x1Tb RAID-5, 1x500GB
Display(s) 1x LG 27UD69P (4k), 2x Dell S2340M (1080p)
Case Antec 1200
Audio Device(s) Onboard Realtek® ALC898 8-Channel High Definition Audio
Power Supply Seasonic 1000-watt 80 PLUS Platinum
Mouse Logitech G602
Keyboard Rosewill RK-9100
Software Ubuntu 17.10
Benchmark Scores Benchmarks aren't everything.
#2
If not, keep it simply and stay with MBR.
I disagree with that assessment because MBR is going the way of the dinosaur. I would only suggest MBR if your machine is too old to boot using UEFI or if your OS doesn't support it, which is unlikely with any semi-modern OS. As I said in that necro'ed thread two years ago, the real benefit is the size of the disk. Additional partitions can be nice but, it's by no means helpful in most cases. Since UEFI exposes more to the OS than a traditional BIOS does, I would always suggest UEFI boot if your machine can do it because it usually translates to a more seamless experience when it comes to where the BIOS ends and the OS begins.

tl;dr: If you're doing a clean installation, there really is no reason to not use UEFI unless your machine can't do it. It's the standard now and almost every machine in the last 5-6 years now supports it.
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2009
Messages
11,471 (3.95/day)
Likes
6,245
Location
Ohio
System Name Daily Driver
Processor 7900X 4.5GHz 10c/10t 1.15V.
Motherboard ASUS Prime X299 Deluxe
Cooling MCR320 + Kuplos Kryos NEXT CPU block
Memory GSkill Trident Z 4x8 GB DDR4 3600 MHz CL16
Video Card(s) EVGA GTX 1080 FTW3
Storage 512GB Patriot Hellfire, 512GB OCZ RD400, 640GB Caviar Black, 2TB Caviar Green
Display(s) Yamakasi 27" 2560x1440 IPS
Case Thermaltake P5
Power Supply EVGA 750W Supernova G2
Benchmark Scores Faster than most of you! Bet on it! :)
#3
Never knew this was a question...

*SATA SSD is far more diversified and portable. One can use a USB3.0 Adapter Cable with any SATA SSD
why cant you do this with a hdd? It is a bit bigger, but still easily done.

Interesting random thread..
 
Joined
Nov 11, 2014
Messages
11 (0.01/day)
Likes
1
#4
I disagree with that assessment because MBR is going the way of the dinosaur. I would only suggest MBR if your machine is too old to boot using UEFI or if your OS doesn't support it, which is unlikely with any semi-modern OS. As I said in that necro'ed thread two years ago, the real benefit is the size of the disk. Additional partitions can be nice but, it's by no means helpful in most cases. Since UEFI exposes more to the OS than a traditional BIOS does, I would always suggest UEFI boot if your machine can do it because it usually translates to a more seamless experience when it comes to where the BIOS ends and the OS begins.

tl;dr: If you're doing a clean installation, there really is no reason to not use UEFI unless your machine can't do it. It's the standard now and almost every machine in the last 5-6 years now supports it.
We won't argue the point. The assessment I made intuitively includes older DDR3 systems. Anyone building a new PC Rig and installs Windows 10 on an unallocated drive, the installation process will automatically choose to setup the primary drive as GPT. We can both agree on this; no need for either of us to pound our chests going forward.

Cheers

Never knew this was a question...

why cant you do this with a hdd? It is a bit bigger, but still easily done.

Interesting random thread..
Of course you can if you own an external HDD case with SATA Headers.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Joined
Nov 11, 2014
Messages
11 (0.01/day)
Likes
1
#5
This is inconsequential.
Many "average" users are confused about GPT vs MBR and they never get a straight answer. Since I am in the business of consulting Windows Users about optimizing old and new computer via remote connection, I simply decided to put what is obvious to us tech-heads into simple language for the non tech-heads.

It's really that down-to-earth.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Dec 31, 2009
Messages
11,471 (3.95/day)
Likes
6,245
Location
Ohio
System Name Daily Driver
Processor 7900X 4.5GHz 10c/10t 1.15V.
Motherboard ASUS Prime X299 Deluxe
Cooling MCR320 + Kuplos Kryos NEXT CPU block
Memory GSkill Trident Z 4x8 GB DDR4 3600 MHz CL16
Video Card(s) EVGA GTX 1080 FTW3
Storage 512GB Patriot Hellfire, 512GB OCZ RD400, 640GB Caviar Black, 2TB Caviar Green
Display(s) Yamakasi 27" 2560x1440 IPS
Case Thermaltake P5
Power Supply EVGA 750W Supernova G2
Benchmark Scores Faster than most of you! Bet on it! :)
#6
Joined
Dec 29, 2010
Messages
621 (0.24/day)
Likes
249
#7
Many "average" users are confused about GPT vs MBR and they never get a straight answer. Since I am in the business of consulting Windows Users about optimizing old and new computer via remote connection, I simply decided to put what is obvious to us tech-heads into simple language for the non tech-heads.

It's really that down-to-earth.
No one cares. Ya didn't explain the diff between the two modes, how it affects the OS. No one asked if there is a speed difference because there isn't. All this is non-related to using a SSD as a main drive.
 

Aquinus

Resident Wat-man
Joined
Jan 28, 2012
Messages
10,398 (4.85/day)
Likes
5,477
Location
Concord, NH
System Name Kratos
Processor Intel Core i7 3930k @ 4.2Ghz
Motherboard ASUS P9X79 Deluxe
Cooling Zalman CPNS9900MAX 130mm
Memory G.Skill DDR3-2133, 16gb (4x4gb) @ 9-11-10-28-108-1T 1.65v
Video Card(s) MSI AMD Radeon R9 390 GAMING 8GB @ PCI-E 3.0
Storage 2x120Gb SATA3 Corsair Force GT Raid-0, 4x1Tb RAID-5, 1x500GB
Display(s) 1x LG 27UD69P (4k), 2x Dell S2340M (1080p)
Case Antec 1200
Audio Device(s) Onboard Realtek® ALC898 8-Channel High Definition Audio
Power Supply Seasonic 1000-watt 80 PLUS Platinum
Mouse Logitech G602
Keyboard Rosewill RK-9100
Software Ubuntu 17.10
Benchmark Scores Benchmarks aren't everything.
#8
We won't argue the point. The assessment I made intuitively includes older DDR3 systems. Anyone building a new PC Rig and installs Windows 10 on an unallocated drive, the installation process will automatically choose to setup the primary drive as GPT. We can both agree on this; no need for either of us to pound our chests going forward.
Well, for the P9X79 Deluxe I have, unless you boot from the installer using the "UEFI" option in the boot list, it won't actually do this out of the box. If the installer starts with UEFI, it will install for UEFI but, older machines like mine will give you the option and will explicitly call it out and it's important to select UEFI if you want your boot drive to be GPT but, this only matters for the boot drive.

For everyone else, context helps. This thread came out of this one that was closed because necro'ing threads is usually frowned upon.
https://www.techpowerup.com/forums/...time-and-r-w-speeds-iops.214391/#post-3742749
 

Athlon2K15

HyperVtX™
Joined
Sep 27, 2006
Messages
7,848 (1.92/day)
Likes
2,305
Location
O-H-I-O
Processor AMD Ryzen 7 1800x
Motherboard Asus Crosshair VI Hero
Cooling CH6 EK MonoBlock
Memory TridentZ 16GB DDR4 3600
Video Card(s) GTX 1080Ti EK Full Cover Block
Storage Samsung 960 Pro
Display(s) LG 34UC88 Curved Ultrawide
Case EVGA DG86
Power Supply Corsair RM850x
Mouse Asus Strix Evolve
Keyboard Asus Strix Claymore
#9
GPT is here to eliminate the limits imposed by MBR, nothing else.
 
Joined
Nov 11, 2014
Messages
11 (0.01/day)
Likes
1
#10
GPT is here to eliminate the limits imposed by MBR, nothing else.
Wrong. GPT has been around since the 1990's. It didn't find it's niche' in home computers until the last six years.

At any rate. This post will be found by the general public using a Search Engine to find the answer. That's what matters the most, not the opinions of people with newer UEFI BIOS systems.

Moderators can Lock this thread as it appears no one can present empirical evidence that contradicts my subjective experience since Windows 8 appeared on the scene. (bogus OS UI/W8)
 

Athlon2K15

HyperVtX™
Joined
Sep 27, 2006
Messages
7,848 (1.92/day)
Likes
2,305
Location
O-H-I-O
Processor AMD Ryzen 7 1800x
Motherboard Asus Crosshair VI Hero
Cooling CH6 EK MonoBlock
Memory TridentZ 16GB DDR4 3600
Video Card(s) GTX 1080Ti EK Full Cover Block
Storage Samsung 960 Pro
Display(s) LG 34UC88 Curved Ultrawide
Case EVGA DG86
Power Supply Corsair RM850x
Mouse Asus Strix Evolve
Keyboard Asus Strix Claymore
#11
You started a thread and posed a question to yourself and then continued to answer it. All you wanted here was a platform to spew your bullshit thread about GPT vs MBR and somehow ruled it has something to do with SSDs. The fact is we would all be using MBR still if drive capacity was under 2TB as GPT allows nothing more than high cap drives to be bootable.
 

Kursah

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 15, 2006
Messages
10,941 (2.68/day)
Likes
5,048
Location
Missoula, MT, USA
System Name Kursah's Gaming Rig - Haswell Edition | Spartan Home Server 2015
Processor i7 4790k 4.0/4.8 @ 1.26v | i7 4790k 4.0/4.4 @ 1.18v - Both delidded w/CLU
Motherboard Asus Z87-Pro - BIOS 2103 | Asus Z87-Pro - BIOS 2103
Cooling Noctua NH-U14S Push-Pull | Cooler Master 212 EVO Stock - Using NT-H1 and AC MX-4
Memory 16GB (2x8) Corsair Dominator DDR3 2400 CL11 | 32GB (4x8) G.Skill DDR3-1600 CL9
Video Card(s) MSI GTX980 Ti Gaming 6G LE @ Stock | Onboard Intel HD 4600
Storage 850EVO 250GB SSD, 960GB SSD, 1x2TB | 840 120GB SSD, RAID10 6x2TB (6TB) + 8TB Backup
Display(s) Samsung 32" TV IPS 1080p, Dell 23" U2312HM IPS 1080p | 19" 4:3 Dell LCD..mostly RDP.
Case Corsair 600C - Stock Fans on Low | Lian Li Lancool PC-K7 - Cougar fans
Audio Device(s) Aune T1 mk1 > AKG K553 Pro + HiFiMAN HE-350 (Equalizer APO + PeaceUI) | Realtek ALC1150
Power Supply EVGA 750G2 Modular + APC 1500VA UPS | EVGA KR500 80+ Bronze + CyberPowerPC 1000VA UPS
Mouse Logitech G502 | Dell USB Laser Mouse
Keyboard Logitech G15 rv2 | Dell USB Keyboard
Software Windows 10 Pro x64 | Windows Server 2012 R2 (GUI Core,Hyper-V + VMs)
Status
Not open for further replies.