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Help undervolting i7 8750h Throttlestop

Thrasher

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Your settings look good. If you have any stability issues (BSOD), reduce your cache undervolt to -125 mV or -130 mV. Most 8750H are not 100% stable when the cache is at -140 mV.


That is a good temperature for a gaming laptop. Many recent laptops are frequently over 90°C while gaming.
thank you, what helped me was to change thermal paste and clean the fans in addition to the application
 

Badrun

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I have no idea what i am doing.

asdfg.png
Screenshot (4).png
 

unclewebb

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I have no idea what i am doing.
There is piles of information available here on TechPowerUp in the ThrottleStop forum and piles more information available on YouTube.

To undervolt your CPU you have to undervolt both the CPU core and CPU cache. If you only undervolt the CPU core like your picture shows, this will not accomplish anything. The CPU will ignore this request.

Typical values for an 8750H are -125 mV for the cache and -200 mV for the core. Start with the core and cache set equally to -125 mV. Run Cinebench R20 for a baseline test and see how it goes. Increase the core voltage in steps of -25 mV and run another test. If you see an improvement, keep going. When your scores or temperatures stop improving then you have gone far enough. A good 8750H can score 3000 points during this test. Some Dell laptops are limited to about 2500 due to power limit throttling issues.

 

applebottomjeans

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new to this and looks like an old forum.
i recently bought the asus m15 (10750h cometlake 1660ti) and it is running really hot at normal use the temps sometimes gets to 73 and averages at 55-61
but while gaming I think the temps are fine (70-77). I have also undervolted this laptop to -75, but I don't think it is doing anything

a reply would be a huge help
 

unclewebb

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Post a picture of the FIVR monitoring table. Make sure the offset undervolt is applied to both the core and the cache.

Most laptops run at 90C. Your temps are great.
 

applebottomjeans

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Post a picture of the FIVR monitoring table. Make sure the offset undervolt is applied to both the core and the cache.

Most laptops run at 90C. Your temps are great.
HEYY thanks for the reply!!!

the undervolt was done through bios. It is locked in FIVR control, is there a way to unlock this?
I think while under normal use the laptop used to be around 47-49 but now it is somewhere between 54-57 and I want to lower that

Saw your replies about speedshift and after doing that the temps while gaming averages at 68-71 that was really cool


Thanks!!
 

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unclewebb

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@applebottomjeans - You are doing a great job killing the performance of your laptop. When Disable Turbo is checked, your CPU will run at about 60% of its rated speed. Strike 1.

A 10750H is a 6 core - 12 thread CPU. Your screenshot shows that you have disabled half of your CPU. Open the C states window to see if you have a 6 core 6 thread CPU or maybe you only have a 3 core - 6 thread CPU. It is not good either way. Strike 2.

And finally, the PROCHOT temperature is set to 86°C which is 14°C less than the Intel recommended value. This is also going to kill full load performance. Strike 3. You're laptop is out. You might as well have bought a low end tablet.

If you buy a laptop and you cannot run it at its full rated specs without it overheating then you put it back in the box and you take it back to the store for a full refund. How else are manufacturers going to learn that building laptops like this is not acceptable?
 

applebottomjeans

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@applebottomjeans - You are doing a great job killing the performance of your laptop. When Disable Turbo is checked, your CPU will run at about 60% of its rated speed. Strike 1.

A 10750H is a 6 core - 12 thread CPU. Your screenshot shows that you have disabled half of your CPU. Open the C states window to see if you have a 6 core 6 thread CPU or maybe you only have a 3 core - 6 thread CPU. It is not good either way. Strike 2.

And finally, the PROCHOT temperature is set to 86°C which is 14°C less than the Intel recommended value. This is also going to kill full load performance. Strike 3. You're laptop is out. You might as well have bought a low end tablet.

If you buy a laptop and you cannot run it at its full rated specs without it overheating then you put it back in the box and you take it back to the store for a full refund. How else are manufacturers going to learn that building laptops like this is not acceptable?
Thanks for the reply!!

Disable the turbo is now unchecked and I had also disabled hyperthreading from bios, should I also enable that?
I didn't understand anything about C states in throttlestop and here is the screenshot.
so, I changed the prochot temps to 100 (I'm pretty sure I hadn't touched that before)

Thanks!
 

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unclewebb

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I had also disabled hyperthreading from bios
You paid for a 6 core 12 thread CPU. Might as well use it at its rated spec unless you have a constant 99°C issue that you are trying to avoid.

Here is how the C states look on my desktop CPU when it is idle with Chrome minimized. Cores spending 99% of the time in the low power C7 state is possible. Some users have random glitches and stuttering and do not realize how many background tasks are killing performance. Get your idle background processes down to a minimum and your computer will perform better.

1619806176141.png


The Intel thermal throttling temperature is typically 100°C and they set the shut down temperature to approximately 125°C. Some manufacturers have decided that this is too high so they have lowered the shut down temperature to 100°C. If you set PROCHOT Offset to 0, now the thermal throttling temperature and the shut down temperature are exactly the same. This will cause a problem. The CPU will not have a chance to throttle. It will simply get up to 100°C and shut down. If you have any shut downs like this right at 100°C then I would suggest setting PROCHOT Offset to approximately 3 to avoid this from happening.
 

applebottomjeans

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You paid for a 6 core 12 thread CPU. Might as well use it at its rated spec unless you have a constant 99°C issue that you are trying to avoid.

Here is how the C states look on my desktop CPU when it is idle with Chrome minimized. Cores spending 99% of the time in the low power C7 state is possible. Some users have random glitches and stuttering and do not realize how many background tasks are killing performance. Get your idle background processes down to a minimum and your computer will perform better.

View attachment 198661

The Intel thermal throttling temperature is typically 100°C and they set the shut down temperature to approximately 125°C. Some manufacturers have decided that this is too high so they have lowered the shut down temperature to 100°C. If you set PROCHOT Offset to 0, now the thermal throttling temperature and the shut down temperature are exactly the same. This will cause a problem. The CPU will not have a chance to throttle. It will simply get up to 100°C and shut down. If you have any shut downs like this right at 100°C then I would suggest setting PROCHOT Offset to approximately 3 to avoid this from happening.
I watched some videos about lowering high temps and followed the steps, they did say the performance will be reduced. But I thought it was fine as long as I got those temps down while gaming. Will doing this shorten the life of the laptop?


And yeah I set the prochot value to 3 just in case.
Btw what might be the glitches and stuttering that you are talking about, and how to avoid those?

Thanks!!
 

unclewebb

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as long as I got those temps down
Intel CPUs and gaming laptops are designed to run at over 90°C. It is always a good idea to get the temps down but do not completely kill the performance of your computer when doing this. As long as your CPU is not constantly thermal throttling, its temperature is OK.

Some useless apps and poorly written drivers can randomly put a significant load on your CPU. When this happens, you might get a brief stutter in a game. You might get regular stutters.

how to avoid those?
Watch the C state data that ThrottleStop reports when your computer is idle. It is a good indication if there are any poorly behaving programs running in the background. Cores spending 99% of their time in the low power C7 state is ideal. Most computers are nowhere near this. They have too many badly behaving apps running in the background. Find out what is running on your computer and decide if it needs to be running or not. ShutUp10 is a good program to manage some of the useless Windows tasks that Microsoft has running on your computer. Your games will run smoother if the CPU is not being constantly interrupted.

 

budafuko

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ya i have the same chip it runs super hot. just to let you know changing to kryonaut paste lowered my temp by 20 degrees and i barely get red warnings anymore (yellow only show up on startup) and i've only had 1 emergency shutoff. than since i've undervolted its all been good (-125) i tried -150 but get an emergency shutoff when under heavy load. i imagine you can probably go to -135v, -140v but from 125 only lower it by 10 at a time and then test under heavy load.

unfortunately to stop the emergency shut offs during long time heavy loads i had to disable turbo mode but if you dont play for hours at a time it won't happen with turbo on

also raise your thermal limit to 100 (it is set in the 90s as default for desktops but for laptops its supposed to be 100) [this will stop the red warnings even before changing paste]
 

unclewebb

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raise your thermal limit to 100
Some laptops have reduced the thermal shut down temperature to 100°C. Intel does not recommend doing this but that has not stopped laptop manufacturers from doing this.

That might be the cause of your emergency shutoffs. If your laptop has lowered the shut down temperature, I would suggest setting PROCHOT Offset to 3 or 4. This will help prevent the CPU from ever getting to 100°C and randomly shutting down.
 

SeverZV

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Hello everyone. forgive me, please, for my "english" - this is a translator from google.

half a year I read your forum, because I have the same problem as many visitors - overheating of this processor and throttling. and so I decided to write my post (thanks for the opportunity to register on the forum to the administrator).

my problem: a laptop alienwar m17 with a video card rtx 2060, i7 8750H. from the very beginning, from the moment of purchase, the laptop warmed up even in normal mode (non-game, only a text editor) by a hundred degrees. only after a long search I found out that the processor turned on the turbo mode all the time. I learned how to turn off the turbo mode through the power consumption settings (set the processor power to 90% and the turbo mode was gone). but at the same time the power of the processor has dropped, and the desire to play games has dropped. so I took up further study of the issue and came across this program - ThrottleStop.

help, please, with the help of this program remove the throttling of the processor.

My problem now is that when playing cyberpunk, for example, or some other powerful (or even old - GTA 5) game, the processor heats up to 80 degrees, and after 80 degrees, trotting starts and almost any game turns into a slideshow. here help me, please, so that there is no trotting at 85, 90 degrees, because these temperatures are safe for this processor - why trotting? why is the processor slowing down? help, please, remove trotting.
 

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unclewebb

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Here is your problem.

1623941513960.png


At 38W, your CPU is at 100°C and that is with turbo boost turned off. You have to fix the cooling problem. The 8750H is a 45W processor. It should be able to run at 45W without ever over heating like this. You need to open up your laptop and clean it out and you need to replace the thermal paste. You will never be able to play games if your laptop is running this hot.

ThrottleStop cannot fix your broken laptop.
 

DxOdin

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I need help is anything ok with this settings? i think power limits is my enemy but better hear other opinions
 

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unclewebb

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power limits is my enemy
You are correct. Your ThrottleStop settings look OK. The problem is that some laptop models enforce the 45W TDP limit. You cannot use ThrottleStop to run your CPU long term at more than 45W. The CPU is forced to slow down so it does not exceed 45W. That is what your log file shows. Lots of PL1 power limit throttling. The result is that when your CPU is fully loaded, it will slow down to 3000 MHz instead of running at 3900 MHz. That is a big loss in performance.

I wish there was a way to fix this problem but there is not. An 8750H that does not power limit throttle can score over 3000 points in Cinebench R20. With your laptop, that is impossible.
 

SeverZV

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Here is your problem.

View attachment 204312

At 38W, your CPU is at 100°C and that is with turbo boost turned off. You have to fix the cooling problem. The 8750H is a 45W processor. It should be able to run at 45W without ever over heating like this. You need to open up your laptop and clean it out and you need to replace the thermal paste. You will never be able to play games if your laptop is running this hot.

ThrottleStop cannot fix your broken laptop.
I had the same problem right after cleaning the laptop and replacing the thermal paste. and after the purchase. So I ask - how to set up the program so that there is no trotthling?
 

unclewebb

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how to set up the program so that there is no throttling?
If you bought a laptop with bad cooling, you cannot use ThrottleStop to fix that problem. Some laptops are badly designed. You must fix the cooling problem to fix the throttling problem.

Your ThrottleStop settings are OK.
 

panaxin

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There is piles of information available here on TechPowerUp in the ThrottleStop forum and piles more information available on YouTube.

To undervolt your CPU you have to undervolt both the CPU core and CPU cache. If you only undervolt the CPU core like your picture shows, this will not accomplish anything. The CPU will ignore this request.

Typical values for an 8750H are -125 mV for the cache and -200 mV for the core. Start with the core and cache set equally to -125 mV. Run Cinebench R20 for a baseline test and see how it goes. Increase the core voltage in steps of -25 mV and run another test. If you see an improvement, keep going. When your scores or temperatures stop improving then you have gone far enough. A good 8750H can score 3000 points during this test. Some Dell laptops are limited to about 2500 due to power limit throttling issues.

unclewebb, I have an Acer nitro 5 notebook with an i7-8750h and I'm following your recommendations to put the CPU core and CPU cache at -0.125mv and go up from -0.025mv core and testing with cinebench. The first test started with 2,523 points and each time it increased it rose almost 100 points, until with -0.200mv it reached 2800 points. I tested it in a game (Path of exile) and the game crashed 2 times, on the third try I had a blue screen of the operating system. After the crashes, I returned the core to -0.150mV, is any of my configuration wrong? If you said that this processor can reach -0.200mV, why is mine crashing?
 

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pwnchap

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Years ago I grabbed a Throttlestop configuration from a video which seemed rather good. However, after reading this forum from start to finish I find myself rather confused and not knowing whether it was optimal or not. By confused I mean that some people should Disable and Lock Turbo Power Limits under FIVR while others should not, some are setting various PL1 and PL2's. As I cannot make heads or tails for what would fit my system, I've decided to completely wipe my Throttlestop.ini and let the computer figure its own default state out and continue from there, hopefully with some help from this forum :)

The only thing I'm fairly sure of what to do with is the undervolting of the CPU core and cache by -0.125mV. I haven't tried to tweak it with Cinebench, but I plan on doing that as part of testing. Can anybody help with the rest? I think (I hope!) I just need a few pointers in the right direction.

My laptop is a TongFang gk5cn6z with a 8750H and a 1060.

Thanks in advance!

I've attached my default setting screenshots except the cpu and cpu cache voltage which I've changed.
 

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unclewebb

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undervolting of the CPU core and cache by -0.125mV
That is a rookie mistake. Do some Cinebench testing to get a better understanding of using different core and cache voltages. The 8750H will run better with the core set to a much higher value compared to the cache. Typically the core can be set to -200 mV while the cache is at -125 mV. Here are a couple of examples.


For the EDP OTHER throttling problem across all three domains, go into the FIVR window and set the core and cache IccMax to the maximum, 255.75. In the TPL window, you also need to set "Power Limit 4" to 0.

Above Power Limit 4, check the Speed Shift option. You have an 8th Gen CPU that is capable of using Speed Shift Technology but your laptop manufacturer did not enable this feature. You need to use ThrottleStop to enable this. When this is checked, press Apply and ThrottleStop will show you the appropriate values for Speed Shift Min and Max. For the 8750H, Min is 8 and Max is 41.

After you press OK and go out to the main screen, you should see SST in green. Now you can check the Speed Shift - EPP box. Set the EPP value to 0 for full speed all of the time. Set EPP to 80 if you want your CPU to slow down when it is lightly loaded. This is not that necessary when plugged in but some users still prefer doing this. When running on battery power, an EPP setting of 128 or a little higher works well.

Check the MMIO Lock box and clear the Disable Power Limit Control box. Clearing this box tells ThrottleStop that you want ThrottleStop to actively manage your power limits.

I would set Long Power PL1 to 60 and I would set Short Power PL2 to 70. Set the turbo time limit to the default value, 28 seconds. If you have good cooling, these settings will help out with getting maximum performance.

After you do all of that, turn on the Log File option and go do some testing. Run Cinebench or play a game for at least 15 minutes. When finished testing, exit ThrottleStop so it can finalize your log file. Attach a log to your next post so I can see how your computer is running. It will be in the ThrottleStop / Logs folder.
 

Mezzmix

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i Have a question, i have a Msi Gf72 8re with a i7 8750h and a gtx 1060. I also want to get a good undervolt on my cpu, but everything what i do doesnt really make the job. Heres a few screens of my throttlestop
 

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unclewebb

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The 8750H has a 45W TDP power rating. The heatsink and fan are not designed to run your 8750H at 65W. That is why your computer runs so hot.

You can try changing the thermal paste or you can lower the power limits to 45W. That is all your cooling can handle.
 
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