• Welcome to TechPowerUp Forums, Guest! Please check out our forum guidelines for info related to our community.

Help with mCubed T-Balancer / ATITool SysTool

mdearth

New Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2005
Messages
8 (0.00/day)
Likes
0
#1
mCubed T-Balancer is a fan controller with WAY to many features to list, see thier website.
http://www.mcubed-tech.com/eng/produkte.htm

I have an Asus P5AD2-E Premium and and X850xt both water cooled. The T-Balancer is in route to my house from Austria as I post this. It can read its own digital or analog temp probes but requires MBM to view the motherboard & GPU temps. MBM does not appear to be supported anymore and does not work with my P5AD2 but it will display the GPU temp from ATITool. I asked mCubed what other options I have and they suggested Speedfan, but was not clear if it worked with the T-Balancer yet. Speedfan worked for the motherboard but not the GPU from ATITool. Currently I use ATITool (Love It) and "Asus Probe" to monitor. I do NOT want to run, ATITool, MBM, Speedfan, & mCubed all at this same time to get results.

My questions are...
1. How does one app like MBM report temperature data to another app like mCubed, and why dont they all?
2. Why cant ATITool or Asus Probe report it to mCubed software?
3. Cas SysTool help me?

The reason for posting this in techpowerup and not to mCubed again (no forum just e-mail) is because I really like the ATITool and the amazing support that is available. Im curiouse if SysTool would report CPU, MB Temp, GPU, & VGA Board temps to mCubed Software? This is important because I can program all fans im my case to dynamicly adjust to any temp and the CPU & GPU bult in temps are way more accurate then the T-Balancers digital or analog probes.

HELP!
 

W1zzard

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 14, 2004
Messages
17,172 (3.43/day)
Likes
18,149
Processor Core i7-4790K
Memory 16 GB
Video Card(s) GTX 1080
Display(s) 30" 2560x1600 + 19" 1280x1024
Software Windows 7
#2
mbm uses a shared memory to store sensor data which all application on the system can read from.

atitool has a shared memory of its own. you can grab atitool data from there- if mcube contacts me i can share with them how to access it.

systool does not have a shared memory yet but this can be added rather quick. i'll see if i can get it done in the next few days
 

Zoultan

New Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2005
Messages
5 (0.00/day)
Likes
0
#3
Life, made easy..

The answer is simple (and luckally, would be free)....

(Speed Fan + SysTool) + ATITool + MCubed_Hardware

Possibly sponsored/funded by the only player in the equation that appears to be making money to begin with =)

http://forums.techpowerup.com/showthread.php?t=3455

-Zoultan
President and CEO of g33ks-arrrrrr-us
 
Last edited:

Zoultan

New Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2005
Messages
5 (0.00/day)
Likes
0
#4
And if mCubed is smart...

And if mCubed is smart, they will eventually release API that could be called by any program, without having to load mCubed software. Once a company creates a way for it's patrons to customise their product experience, their community will not only grow to large numbers, but also do most of the grunt work for them. (Think of the difference between the puny 'communities' created by any single console game, and the massive 'communities' created by modifiable and 1/2 open source games such as Quake, Half Life, etc).
 

Zoultan

New Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2005
Messages
5 (0.00/day)
Likes
0
#6
Api...

- Short Definition
API is released by a coder/company/etc. The actual files released are usually DLL's or OCX's that *other* coders can use, to 'call' the functionality of the original program, without having to load the original program.

I.E. If they were to release API that mirrors the program you linked, then we could drop it into something like speedfan, or SysTool =)

- Long Definition
Abbreviation of application program interface, a set of routines, protocols, and tools for building software applications. A good API makes it easier to develop a program by providing all the building blocks. A programmer puts the blocks together.

Most operating environments, such as MS-Windows, provide an API so that programmers can write applications consistent with the operating environment. Although APIs are designed for programmers, they are ultimately good for users because they guarantee that all programs using a common API will have similar interfaces. This makes it easier for users to learn new programs.