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How does a receiver's volume setting correlate with the output?

Discussion in 'Audio, Video & Home Theater' started by twilyth, Dec 11, 2011.

  1. twilyth Guest

    Both of my receivers display output (volume) in db. My RX-V765 has 95W into 7 channels. If the display says my output is -10db, how many watts is is it putting out? Does the display mean anything at all? Thanks.
     
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  2. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    It all depends on how it's calibrated and the strength of the input signal.
     
  3. twilyth Guest

    Regarding the strength of the inputs, let's say they are all digital, which in my case they are.
     
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  4. 1freedude

    1freedude

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    I'm gonna guess that is it is simply a logrithmic scale to indicate knob position.

    Does the knob have stops at -infinity db and 0db?
     
  5. twilyth Guest

    I don't know abouty -∞ but it does go at least to -50db and +10db. Never tried to push it farther in either direction.
     
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  6. 1freedude

    1freedude

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    What I mean is....does the knob just spin and spin and spin?
     
  7. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    No, when I said the "strength" of the signal, I meant the amplitude of the analog sound's waveform. The fact it's transmitted digitally isn't relevant. :toast:
     
  8. twilyth Guest

    I don't understand. Since it's digital, the amplitude would have to be encoded. AFAIK, you can only attenuate that from line level.
     
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  9. 1freedude

    1freedude

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    Think pwm
     
  10. twilyth Guest

    I don't think they use pulse width modulation for audio. Do they?
     
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  11. 1freedude

    1freedude

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  12. twilyth Guest

    I'll try again later. It's saying I can't load the page. {shrug}

    edit: server not found.
     
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  13. 1freedude

    1freedude

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    It says pwm is used to digitally encode analog
     
  14. BumbleBee

    BumbleBee

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    there is no way to tell. if you plug in a kill-a-watt meter the readings are going to be all over the place.
     
  15. Jetster

    Jetster

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    My Yamaha XR V571 show output in a way that I do not understand at all
     
  16. Bundy

    Bundy

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    I don't know a lot about this but AFAIK, 0dB is the reference volume. If everything is set correctly, and when playing the reference pink noise, your amp will be at maximum wattage and the speakers will be pumping the reference volume (e.g. Dolby is 105dB) when the volume is at 0dB.

    As this is almightly loud, most systems use -20dB as the reference point for calibrating speakers.
     
  17. de.das.dude

    de.das.dude Pro Indian Modder

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    amplifiers. you cant explain that.


    i think a sound engineer will be able to tell you the real answer.
     
  18. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    I think this really calls for a diagram, but unfortunately, I don't have one, lol.

    Ok, let's put it another way. If the singer sings softly into the microphone, the volume level is quieter than if they shout - there's a huge difference, in fact. The output of the amplifier follows this, therefore the wattage being put out at any instant varies dynamically with the input signal - and that variation can be huge.

    EDIT: the difference in amplitude between the input signal and the output signal is called the gain of the amplifier. Adjusting that volume knob alters this gain. Therefore, the actual output level - watts put out - with the volume knob at any particular point depends on the input signal and the volume knob.

    As you can see, the above explanation doesn't say anything about how the signal is transmitted to the amplifier. Regardless of whether it's done in the analog domain or the digital domain, the result is the same. In the digital domain, the bigger the numbers, the higher the volume.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2011
  19. Frederik S Staff

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    It is the attenuation level which the amplifier applies. It is not the dB of the speakers.

    -0 dB means that the amplifier is at full gain. It is related to how many watts it is putting out, but in order to compute that you need to know the speaker load, which is variable across the frequency spectrum. Your amplifier will at - 0 dB be able to output 95W RMS into a 8 Ohm load.

    A digital-in will be converted by the DAC in the amplifier Usually the DAC will output something that is very close to a normal line-level signal which is then routed to the gain stages in the amplifier.
     
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  20. twilyth Guest

    Thanks man. that's exactly the assumption I had been going on but I didn't have anything to base it on. Much appreciated. :toast:
     
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  21. BurgKaW97521 New Member

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    Thanks men for all your tips
     
  22. AsRock

    AsRock TPU addict

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    Same here i turn the crap off lol.
     
  23. CJCerny

    CJCerny

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    There's no way to tell how many watts are being output by the receiver based on the db display. The watts output is different at -10db based on the impedance of the speakers you have connected to the receiver.
     

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