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how to remove and fix a cpu?

Discussion in 'System Builder's Advice' started by subhendu, Jan 5, 2010.

  1. subhendu

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    I'll get amd phenom II x4 965BE c3 stepping cpu this week..
    current cpu is amd x2 6000+
    I don't know 1)how to remove the old cpu and cooler & 2)to fix the new cpu and stock cooler
    experts please help me.If u have pics the please post the link or pics
    Thanks :)
     
  2. mlee49

    mlee49

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    Read your motherboard manual, it will explain how to insert your cpu.
     
  3. Fourstaff

    Fourstaff Moderator Staff Member

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    And make sure you have thermal paste and cleaning fluid for obvious reasons.
     
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  4. Black Panther

    Black Panther Senior Moderator™ Staff Member

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    You have to remove the cooler first. Don't try to remove CPU with cooler attached...

    To remove cooler we have to see what type of cooler you got.
    Some have a lever which you have to pull up, and then the clips beneath get loose.
    Others could have just screws...

    Can you say what type of cooler you have or post a picture?

    Once you get the cooler loose from teh mobo, a little gentle wiggling will get it loose from the cpu and you can pull it out.

    Btw, do first disconnect the power 3-pin of the cooler from the motherboard before pulling the cooler out!

    Now you should clearly see the cpu. There'd be a metal lever on the side of the cpu, it's part of the motherboard. Pull that lever up till it's at a 90 degrees with the motherboard pcb.
    Now you should easily slip the cpu up gently away from the motherboard.
    If it's still stuck hard, don't use force but check whether you did something wrong.
     
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  5. 3volvedcombat

    3volvedcombat New Member

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    Well its pretty simple.

    Its all into unclipping, cleaning, snaping in, and putting the heatsink on.


    First you Open your case, and make sure you unblug your 4 pin power, and 24pin power connectors, and get as much space as you can, just to be safe.

    Then you expect your heatsink, could be queit dusty, but you can clean that during the install. There will be a clip/lever/mechanism, that you will have to pull up ussualy. Pull up on the lever, and the heatsink should become loose.You might have to turn your heatsink 45 degreese side to side to loosen it after both sides of the clipping mechanism is of the bracket on the motherboard. Then it should just pop off with some force or come completely off like a breaze. After that you will see some paste on the processor and your old heatsink. You will see the chip in the socket, and there will be a steel lever to pull up on, Once the lever is realeased to the up position on the socket of the motherboard, you can just pick the processor up right from the socket. After that you can unpack your new processor, but you have to get the Key right. There is 1 edge of the processor that has a key on it, and the socket has the same key. Its really noticable, and theres not way you can put the processor in wrong. Just slide it in, pull the lever down to secure it, grab your thermal past and apply a big drop in the middle, or if you are using the stock heatsink, or the new heatsink that comes with the processor, then the Thermal paste will already be applied. Just put it on then secure both sides of the clip and your done.


    [​IMG]
    Notice the ^^^^ ENDENT On the bottum left corner, its easy stuff trust me.
    Basicly its really simple. Just 2 levers, The processor is keyed so you cant put it on wrong, and make sure to put thermalpast on and secure the heatsink even on all sides. Then your good to go :).
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2010
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  6. OzzmanFloyd120

    OzzmanFloyd120

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    Important to remember, if you're using the stock AMD cooler with the stock thermal pad on it or Arctic Silver 5, the paste may have cured to the CPU, you will have to wiggle and twist the cooler until it lets go of the chip, otherwise it will rip the 6000+ out of the socket.
    Also make sure your cooler can handle the heat output of the 965, as it may be higher than the 6000+
     
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  7. Black Panther

    Black Panther Senior Moderator™ Staff Member

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    3volvedcombat illustrated it perfectly.

    If oriented correctly the cpu will just 'drop' inside without need to use any force whatsoever.
    Once it dropped, push the metal lever back down flush with the mobo.

    If you want to use thermal paste rather than the stock cooler 'sticker', you just have to apply the size of a grain of rice on the processor. No need to spread it. Place cooler on cpu, and clip/screw/lever the cooler in place, what you need to do depends on whether you got the stock cooler or some aftermarket one.

    Remember to plug the power cord of the cooler into the motherboard before switching on your pc!!

    Edit:

    I recently did a little job here and there are photos. I installed a new mobo in my brother's pc and put in a 5000+ BE and cooler. If you want you might take a look...

    It's amateurish though, in that I did the stuff first then took the photo when it was ready so it might not be that helpful.

    I kick myself in the face for not having done the same when I built my E4300 rig, and when I upgraded that to my present E8400 :ohwell:
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2010
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  8. subhendu

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    Thanks guys,,very fast replies from ur side
    I am using stock cooler for the old one...and planning to use stock cooler which comes with 965BE
    & didn't use any thermal paste for the old one
     
  9. Fourstaff

    Fourstaff Moderator Staff Member

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    +2 on BP and 3volved advise (1 each:p)

    Also be aware that sometimes the chip will get stuck on the cooler when you pull the cooler out, do not panic as it is quite common especially with the extra sticky thermal pastes.
     
  10. 3volvedcombat

    3volvedcombat New Member

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    Thats a bad thing really. Use thermal paste, it allows for perfect contact and air transfer, and prevents overheating.

    I feel c00l when i apply thermal paste ^^.
     
  11. Black Panther

    Black Panther Senior Moderator™ Staff Member

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    I did some quick googling on the stock heat sink fan (HSF) for the 965BE and read that there'd be a good deal of "resistance" when you swing the retention arm over to the locked position. (Edit: from my experience it'd be like that bit too much but not as much that you fear the motherboard breaking)

    What I'd advise is to try it out a couple of times before doing it for good.

    Now honestly I don't know how that works if you've got that sticky pad instead of putting thermal paste, because I've never done it like that myself.
    What I've always done was just install the HSF before putting on any paste, checking that I did it well, then take it off, put a rice-grain size blob of paste on the cpu and install the heatsink for good.

    (Then I cross my fingers but so far it's always worked :))
     
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  12. DonInKansas

    DonInKansas

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    Make sure you do any bios updates you may need to make sure that CPU is supported by the mobo. Don't want those issues hanging about either.
     
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  13. subhendu

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    bios updated ...
    and waiting for cpu
    planning to fix 965BE without any thermal paste by using stock sticky pads...
     
  14. Nick89

    Nick89

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    A 965BE wont even work in a board that is not AM3, I don't think. Your board is AM2+ from what I could find out.
     
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  15. subhendu

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    don't break my heart...It will work ...check asus site
     
  16. Nick89

    Nick89

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    THAT WONT WORK!!! You have to use thermal paste! You will kill the CPU!

    What do you mean "stock sticky pads?"

    It will work with a Phenom II 940 AM2+ http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103471

    Reading some notes and it seem the 965 may work in the AM2+ socket
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2010
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  17. subhendu

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    ^^stock thermal pad
    and check asus site not newegg
     
  18. Nick89

    Nick89

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    I did check asus site.

    and the only thing I found was: "Support 45nm Phenom™ II CPU"

    and please define this thermal pad you speak of, are you talking about a heat sink?
     
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  19. mlee49

    mlee49

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    How about we do that, here's Asus's Site for the M3A78-EM:

    http://asus.com/product.aspx?P_ID=KjpYqzmAd9vsTM2D&templete=2

    The 965 is listed under CPU support as of BIOS update 1.03G! Done!


    EDIT: Oh and here's a manual, try reading it. Page 1-12 through 1-15 give you written instructions with PICTURES on what your trying to accomplish.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2010
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  20. DirectorC

    DirectorC New Member

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    I think what subhendu means by not using thermal paste is that he uses the stock cooler, which has that thermal 'pad' (actually a little semi-solid strip of paste) already on it. You guys can all relax now.
     
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  21. Nick89

    Nick89

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    I hope so other wise thats going to be one very dead 965.
     
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  22. subhendu

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    yes I am planning to use stock cooler :respect:

    @ mlee49...thanks for those pics
     
  23. Black Panther

    Black Panther Senior Moderator™ Staff Member

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    No it's just a kind of double-sided-tapey-stickey thingy which can be used instead of thermal paste. It works okay I heard. I never tried it myself though and I never would if I planned to oc (ie never) But it is OK, (emphasis) for mainstream pc machines, they do them like that nowadays...... :ohwell:
     
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  24. brandonwh64

    brandonwh64 Addicted to Bacon and StarCrunches!!!

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    That motherboard hes using will take a AM3 cpu. I had a M3A78-CM motherboard and it was AM3 ready up to 965BE BUT its a DDR2 board :(
     
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  25. subhendu

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