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How to set constant Turbo boost?

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System Name hazazs
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Without a Z series board, there is no way to get it to run the 42 multiplier all cores so stop trying.
You are right. I have set the CPU Ratio Apply Mode to All core, and the CPU Ratio to 42, and when I have set the CPU Ratio Mode from Dynamic to Fixed, the CPU Ratio is locked to 40 max.
By the way as I said "it would be enough for me to keep the base clock (4GHz) all the time (no drops to 800MHz), and have the turbo boost on one core when necessary."
But with C-State enabled it drops, when disabled there is no Turbo.
Is this impossible as well?
 

unclewebb

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Try using a different monitoring program. CPUID HWMonitor flip flops back and forth between 800 MHz, 4000 MHz and 4200 MHz and does not report any of the multipliers in between. The 800 MHz it reports for the minimum might be a false reading. If you want an accurate report of the CPU multiplier give ThrottleStop a try. It is one of the few programs that follows the Intel recommended monitoring method.

Is this impossible as well?
I have already said that if you want the 42 turbo multiplier, you need to have C states enabled.

Now that you know how these CPUs work on your motherboard, take your pick.
 
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System Name hazazs
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If you want an accurate report of the CPU multiplier give ThrottleStop a try.
Is there a way to report multipliers for each of the cores? As I see in the log file there is only one multi value per second.
 

unclewebb

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For your Intel CPU, at any moment in time, all active cores are using the exact same multiplier. The active cores are all physically locked to the same multiplier.

Inactive cores that are in one of the C states like C3 or C6 are not using any multiplier. Those cores are dormant at 0 MHz and 0 volts. The problem with some monitoring software is they are waking up inactive cores and then showing something like 800 MHz which is not accurate.

Try posting a ThrottleStop log. Let's see if it shows any 800 MHz. You can copy and paste log file data to www.pastebin.com or attach a log file to your next post.

Run a 1 Thread test using the TS Bench. With Intel Turbo Boost and C3 or C6 enabled, you should see lots of evidence of your CPU going beyond 4000 MHz. The full 4200 MHz will not be seen during this test because there are always hundreds of Windows background tasks running that are waking up additional cores on a regular basis. As soon as a second or third or fourth core becomes active, the multiplier immediately drops from 42 to 40. ThrottleStop uses high performance timers within the CPU and is able to report a very accurate average multiplier when this is going on. Most other apps are throwing darts at a moving dart board. Sometimes they might get it right but often times they miss and get it wrong.
 
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System Name hazazs
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For your Intel CPU, at any moment in time, all active cores are using the exact same multiplier. The active cores are all physically locked to the same multiplier.

Inactive cores that are in one of the C states like C3 or C6 are not using any multiplier. Those cores are dormant at 0 MHz and 0 volts. The problem with some monitoring software is they are waking up inactive cores and then showing something like 800 MHz which is not accurate.
Thank you, finally I start to understand how my CPU works. But if the active cores are all physically locked to the same multiplier, then why are 8 different multipliers on ThrottleStop in each second?
Because they are not for cores, but thread? And does this mean all cores are active all the time (they don't show "0")?
134802


By the way I have attached the log files from yesterday, which contain about:
~2 hours Javascript programming
~6,5 hours idle time
~2,5 hours fullHD movie
~2 hours Middle-earth - Shadow of War

The minimum multiplier was 30.88? Is this value OK with high performance power plan?

I have done 3 TS bench tests as well:
 

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unclewebb

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On the one hand, you should be commended for uploading 13 hours of log file data. I usually have to beg people to see some data.

On the other hand, I have no idea how you had ThrottleStop setup during your 13 hour session, I have no idea if you made any changes to ThrottleStop or to your Windows power plan, or what exactly you were doing at any point during that log.

Early on, the CPU multiplier is spending most of its time in the 40 to 42 range which is what it should be doing. When you put a load on the CPU, it drops to a steady 40 so that all looks fine. Throughout the day and into the early evening when it looks like you are not using your computer, the multiplier is OK. No problems.

Just before 7 PM, the load goes up slightly and now the maximum multiplier is limited to 40.00. I have no idea if you sat down at your computer and clicked on the Disable Turbo feature or what happened. All I see in the log is that Turbo Boost is now disabled. I was not there so not sure why.

If you switched to a Windows power plan that has the Maximum processor state set to 99% or less instead of 100%, that will disable Turbo Boost.

At 9:25 PM, the load starts to change and Turbo Boost starts working normally again.

Just before 11:00 PM, for the first time, I start seeing the CPU multiplier drop down around 35. Not sure if you changed to the Windows Balanced power profile or what happened. The VID voltage is normally up around 1.21 - 1.24 V. When the multi drops, I start seeing the odd VID reading in the 0.7150 to 0.7250 range. That is more confirmation that something like the balanced power profile is trying to kick in which is lowering your multiplier and voltage. Depending on how you have ThrottleStop setup, it might be fighting against Windows trying to keep the multiplier high even though Windows wants it low.

All in all, something is not quite right. Without knowing exactly how you had ThrottleStop setup or what sort of changes you might have made while testing, it is impossible for me to come to any conclusion. Maybe instead of throwing 13 hours of data at me, show me how you have ThrottleStop setup, make sure you are using the Windows high performance power profile with the Minimum processor state set to 100% and then go play a game. Send me a log file of whatever but give me a few more clues about what that log represents in terms of usage.

As for your other question, when a CPU is lightly loaded, individual threads and cores will be constantly entering and exiting various C states. This is why the multiplier reported for each thread is going to be slightly different from thread to thread. On a lightly loaded CPU, there is no way for all 8 threads to be doing the exact same thing and all 8 threads to be spending the exact same amount of time in each C state. Some variation from thread to thread is 100% normal. The multiplier number reported by ThrottleStop for each thread is a very accurate average during each 1 second sampling period.

In the C0% column, if ThrottleStop shows 1.0, that means the CPU was in the C0 state, actively working on something 1% of the time and the other 99% of the time, it was idle in one of the other low power states doing nothing. The CPU will first go into C1 when it has nothing to do. If C1E is enabled, then it will use that. If still nothing is going on and the CPU does not have any tasks that need to be completed, then it will drop down into C3 or C6 or C7. I think some CPUs drop down directly from C0 to C1 to C7. They might also do the opposite and go from idle in C7 and jump right back into C0 so they can get to work immediately. Intel has made changes with each generation with their goal being CPU cores that can immediately get to work when needed and to go idle when not needed. This is the best way to save power.

Your ThrottleStop idle data looks great. In the pic it shows 1 thread at 0.3% or 0.5% or 0.6% in the C0 state, working on Windows background tasks while the second thread for each core is reporting 0.0. The load on the CPU is very light so there is no need to have both threads active. Windows is letting the hyper thread for each core sit idle. When the load starts to increase, there will always be a primary thread doing more of the work compared to the secondary thread. At any point in time, either thread can be the primary thread.

In the Options window, try checking the Add Limit Reasons to Log File option. If you were not changing the Windows power plan, this might show why your CPU was throttling and will add that info to the log file.
 
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On the other hand, I have no idea how you had ThrottleStop setup during your 13 hour session, I have no idea if you made any changes to ThrottleStop or to your Windows power plan, or what exactly you were doing at any point during that log.
I haven't made any changes to my power plan (still high performance with 100% minimum/maximum processor state), and have left Throttlestop settings at default as well. I have only ticked the "Log File" to make the reports.
BIOS settings:
Intel C-State [Auto]
C1E Support [Disabled]
Package C State limit [Auto]
EIST [Enabled]



I try to write approximately details about what I was doing:
10:28 - 13:45| I have turned on the computer. During this interval occured some:
-Javascript programming
-web browsing
-idle time
13:45 - 18:57 | I have left the computer alone.

Just before 7 PM, the load goes up slightly and now the maximum multiplier is limited to 40.00. I have no idea if you sat down at your computer and clicked on the Disable Turbo feature or what happened. All I see in the log is that Turbo Boost is now disabled. I was not there so not sure why.

At 9:25 PM, the load starts to change and Turbo Boost starts working normally again.
18:57 - 21:25 | I have watched a fullHD movie.
21:25 - around 23:00 |
-web browsing
-idle time

Just before 11:00 PM, for the first time, I start seeing the CPU multiplier drop down around 35. Not sure if you changed to the Windows Balanced power profile or what happened. The VID voltage is normally up around 1.21 - 1.24 V. When the multi drops, I start seeing the odd VID reading in the 0.7150 to 0.7250 range. That is more confirmation that something like the balanced power profile is trying to kick in which is lowering your multiplier and voltage. Depending on how you have ThrottleStop setup, it might be fighting against Windows trying to keep the multiplier high even though Windows wants it low.
That's the time I have started playing Middle-earth - Shadow of War until the end of the log. I play it with Windowed Borderless mode (it was the default screen mode of the game instead of Fullscreen), if it matters anything.

In the Options window, try checking the Add Limit Reasons to Log File option. If you were not changing the Windows power plan, this might show why your CPU was throttling and will add that info to the log file.
According to ThrottleStop none of the limits (thermal, tdp) have triggered at all. However I haven't clicked the "Limits" button for the core/ring/gt reasons. The game have run with stable 60FPS as well. But next time (early next week, or on the weekend if I will have time) I will make a log for you (including limit reasons) just about gaming for a couple of hours.

Until then, have a good day and thanks for the clarification about C-States and thread multipliers.
 
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Send me a log file of whatever but give me a few more clues about what that log represents in terms of usage.
I have attached a new log about a couple of hours of gaming with Shadow of War. I have checked the "Add Limit Reasons to Log File" option, but I can't see any Limit Reason column in it. Does it mean that it wasn't any throttling?

And also you can find my TS settings and a little explanation about the earlier log files in my previous comment.
 

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unclewebb

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Does it mean that it wasn't any throttling?
It just means that there was no throttling that Limit Reasons detected. A CPU can slow down without it triggering anything in Limit Reasons.

Your log file shows stretches where the multiplier is exactly 40.00, right where it should be and then it randomly drops to stretches in the 36 to 37 range. This is not a significant drop but it is unusual that it is happening. When using the Windows High Performance power profile with the Minimum processor state set to 100%, any drops below the default multiplier usually do not happen.

The 6700K supports Speed Shift Technology (SST) but back then, it was unusual for the bios to give users access to this CPU control method. If you want to try playing with this, open the ThrottleStop TPL window and put a check mark in the Speed Shift box. Press OK and when you go back out to the main ThrottleStop screen, you should see SST in green. This means Speed Shift is enabled in your CPU.



Now you can check the Speed Shift - EPP box on the main screen and beside that where it says 128, you can edit that number. Try using a value of 0 for maximum performance. This might prevent those slight CPU multiplier drop outs that you are experiencing. An EPP value of 80 is for people that like to see their CPU slow down when lightly loaded. This is not necessary when plugged in. An EPP value of 255 will make your CPU run really slow regardless of load. Speed Shift is just a modern way to control a CPU. If the bios enables Speed Shift, Windows 10 will automatically use this CPU control method but on older processors or older operating systems, Speed Shift is usually disabled by default. ThrottleStop gives you access to Speed Shift so now you can do some more testing.
 
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Try using a value of 0 for maximum performance. This might prevent those slight CPU multiplier drop outs that you are experiencing.
Sadly it doesn't. There are still these random drops to stretches in the 36 to 37 range. According to the earlier 13 hour logs, it only happens during gaming. By the way the game runs as smooth as butter, so there isn't any visible drops/hiccups at all. But this is still interesting, why does it happen with 100% minimum processor state. Is there a chance that this issue will be "fixed" if I upgrade to Windows 10?

If the bios enables Speed Shift, Windows 10 will automatically use this CPU control method but on older processors or older operating systems, Speed Shift is usually disabled by default
I have an MSI B250 Gaming M3 mobo, and I haven't found any SpeedShift related option in the BIOS (maybe it's hidden/unchangeable). I currently use Windows 7, and SST is disabled by default. Is there a chance that SST will be enabled by default if I upgrade to Windows 10? I would like to minimize the programs are running in the background, especially while gaming, and use TS only to monitor/report when necessary. Or do I need it anyway to change the EPP value?
 

unclewebb

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There are still these random drops to stretches in the 36 to 37 range.
Did ThrottleStop show SST in green when you were testing this?

Is there a chance that SST will be enabled by default if I upgrade to Windows 10?
It is not very likely that Speed Shift will be enabled by default. If your bios has no Speed Shift option and Speed Shift is not being enabled automatically by the bios then Windows 10 will probably assume that it is not available.

If enabling Speed Shift does not solve your problem then there is no need to use ThrottleStop to enable this.

the game runs as smooth as butter
Why waste any more time with this issue? If your computer is running great, be happy and go play some games with it.
 
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