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Intel 12th Gen Core "Alder Lake" Models Bound for January Pictured

btarunr

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Here are some of the first pictures of the 12th Gen Intel Core "Alder Lake" desktop processor models that are expected to join the lineup in January 2022. Intel debuted the series with unlocked "K" and "KF" SKUs, with "locked" SKUs saved for next year. Pictured here are the Core i9-12900, the Core i5-12600, the i5-12500, and the i5-12400. The S-SPEC codes for these processors are SRL4E, SRL4F, SRL4G, and SRL4P, respectively. Our older article details their possible specifications. The lineup isn't limited to these models. Others include the Core i7-12700, and the "F" variants of many of these SKUs, which lack integrated graphics, allowing those with discrete graphics cards to save a little.

Besides these processors, Intel is expected to expand its motherboard chipset options. Currently, Z690 is the only chipset option for the LGA1700 socket. Upcoming chipset models are likely to include the H670, W680, B660, and perhaps even the H610. Intel could use platform I/O for segmentation of these chipsets, besides lack of CPU overclocking support. A big change with the 12th Gen desktop processor lineup concerns Core i5. While the i5-12600K and i5-12600KF feature 6 P-cores and 4 E-cores, the other Core i5 SKUs, including the i5-12600, lack E-cores. The source installed these processors to confirm that the i5-12600 is indeed based on the "H0" silicon and lacks E-cores.



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While the i5-12600K and i5-12600KF feature 6 P-cores and 4 E-cores, the other Core i5 SKUs, including the i5-12600, lack E-cores. The source installed these processors to confirm that the i5-12600 is indeed based on the "H0" silicon and lacks E-cores.
not gonna confuse any1, not gonna be confusing at all i fucking swear!

shit, should've just skipped the 12600 (only 12600K(F)s) and started those at 12500 or 12550 ...
 
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These are the ones I'm looking forward to seeing the reviews on. Hopefully they're a hit and not a miss.
 
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the only way i can see those being misses is if intel goes back to the old ways of disabling XMP on the B660/H670s, tbh
 
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Enter the non-k models.


All they're doing here is what is always done, maximizing their binning yields. This is nothing to whine & complain about.
It's still possible that Intel would use higher-binned dies for lower grade CPUs - depending on demand. I'm also wondering if they can reuse the "mobile" die (6P+8E) for the desktop i5, if it's ever necessary.
 
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It's still possible that Intel would use higher-binned dies for lower grade CPUs - depending on demand. I'm also wondering if they can reuse the "mobile" die (6P+8E) for the desktop i5, if it's ever necessary.
True on both points.
 
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4800 MHz boost for 12600, 4600 for 12500, 4400 for 12400 and 18 MB cache for all 3. Judging from 12600K those i5's could become a success, if (like @Selaya already mentioned) at least B660 boards continue to support XMP.
 

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Am I the only one that does not see the point of the F models?
I mean, the IGP is still there, therefore the die is already big (and expensive). Why would I save $5 and potentially run into trouble if my GPU dies?
F would make sense if Intel designed a CPU without the IGP, having a smaller die and a significant price reduction.
 
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defective IGP, some chips have perfectly functional cores but the IGP is just rip, that's how we get the F parts another case of
[ ... ]
All they're doing here is what is always done, maximizing their binning yields. This is nothing to whine & complain about.
binning
 

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Am I the only one that does not see the point of the F models?
I mean, the IGP is still there, therefore the die is already big (and expensive). Why would I save $5 and potentially run into trouble if my GPU dies?
F would make sense if Intel designed a CPU without the IGP, having a smaller die and a significant price reduction.
Imagine if you buy 5 million F CPUs you'll bee saving $5 million.
Also F might be short of F U as well.
 
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