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Intel Readies the 313 Series SLC-Based Solid State Drives

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According to a fresh report, April will not 'only' see the launch of the Ivy Bridge processor family, as Intel is also preparing the arrival of some new solid state drives specifically designed to be used in SSD/HDD storage setups (made possible by the Smart Response Technology).

The incoming SSD Caching drives are known as the 313 Series (they will replace the 311 Series aka Larson Creek), they come in 2.5-inch (7 mm thick) and mSATA form factors, and make use of 25 nm SLC (single-level cell) NAND Flash memory chips (the 311 models pack 34 nm NAND). The 313 Series SSDs have a SATA 3.0 Gbps interface and will be available in 20 GB ($99) and 24 GB ($119) capacities.



Source: VR-Zone
 
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Please note its SLC.
Thats alot more read/write cycles than a MLC based SSD.

At that price it might be worth using as a pagefile, temp file drive ie operations requiring lots of writes.

What we need is more reasonably priced SLC based SSDs. Its so hard to even find SLC based usb flash drives.
 

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#4
Please note its SLC.
Thats alot more read/write cycles than a MLC based SSD.

At that price it might be worth using as a pagefile, temp file drive ie operations requiring lots of writes.

What we need is more reasonably priced SLC based SSDs. Its so hard to even find SLC based usb flash drives.
Doesn't matter. No home user will ever exhaust the P/E cycles of a modern SSD without explicitly trying to, even with swap enabled. SLC NAND is too expensive to justify its use anywhere outside of a data center, and it will never be reduced to reasonable levels since anything that causes the price of SLC to drop will cause the price of MLC to drop just as much.