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Intel Unveils the Second-Generation Intel-Powered Classmate PC - Netbook

Discussion in 'News' started by malware, Apr 3, 2008.

  1. malware New Member

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    Intel Corporation unveiled a new design of the Intel-powered classmate PC today at the Intel Developer Forum in Shanghai. As announced in a keynote by Andrew Chien, Intel vice president, Corporate Technology Group and director of Intel Research, the second-generation Intel-powered classmate PC is an affordable, fully functional, rugged Internet-centric computer platform. These simple-to-use PCs have wireless capability, longer battery life, water resistant keyboards and are more shock resistant if dropped. Intel is calling this category of PCs "netbooks."

    [​IMG]

    The Intel designed computer offers different choices to manufacturers so each can tailor laptop models for a variety of education needs. The new classmate PC blueprint is the latest innovation and educational tool for parents and teachers to use technology, computers and Internet access to better educate students around the world.

    "Only 5 percent of the world's children today have access to a PC or to the Internet," Chien said. "Education is one of the best examples of how technology improves our lives. We have seen how technology helps teachers create fun learning experiences more efficiently. We have also been touched by children's excitement when they are inspired by technology. The Intel-powered classmate PC is one of the ways we support the IT industry in spreading the benefits of technology in education for children around the world."

    The second-generation classmate PCs are built on Intel Celeron M processor with 802.11b/g Wi-Fi and mesh network capabilities. The top range of these netbooks includes a 9-inch LCD screen, 6-cell battery life, 512 MB memory, a 30 GB HDD (hard disk drive) storage and an integrated webcam. An Intel powered classmate PC supports Microsoft Windows XP and variants of the Linux operating environment. When pre-installed with the education software stack, these netbooks are ideal for classroom-learning environment. Software and content will be available in more than eight languages.

    More than 80 software and hardware vendors, content providers, educational services providers and local OEMs have been working with Intel to develop a complete infrastructure that supports the Intel-powered classmate PC. They were present at today's announcement in Shanghai.

    Chien also said future Intel-powered classmate PCs will be built with the Intel Atom processor. It is an energy-efficient, low-cost computer chip designed to provide wireless capability to small mobile computing devices such as netbooks.

    The updated child-sized computer will continue to be deployed as part of the Intel World Ahead Program, a global initiative aimed at spreading digital accessibility and educational opportunities.

    The Digital Transformation
    Chien also discussed how the second-generation classmate PC is a proof point of the digital transformation he believes is underway today. He highlighted several more digital advances including the use of a cascaded silicon Raman laser as a low-cost Methane gas detector and talked about a novel "holistic" platform power management technology to significantly improve the energy efficiency of a wide range of platforms. He addressed emerging digital consumer applications such as personal robotics and computational photography as fronts where this transformation is taking place by demonstrating "Fuwa," a personal robot from the Fudan University and ReFocus Imaging's light field camera.

    Intel architecture is also transforming with the multi-core movement in mainstream, parallel computing. This will require new programming techniques and languages at the heart of Intel's tera-scale computing research program. Chien, along with Dr. Zhang Xia, chief technology officer of Neusoft Co., demonstrated Ct, a new parallel programming language from Intel research that will make programming for many-cores more efficient than what is possible today. Chien says Intel's research is poised to tackle both the opportunities and the challenges that lie ahead with the Digital Transformation.

    Source: Intel
     
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  2. NamesDontMatter

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    Sure PC's are great, highly useful machines. But do we really need our kids to be on them all the time? Do poor kids in other countries really need laptops when they don't even have enough food? This is kind of a rediculus path if you ask me. But then again its probably great for parents who want to get their kids low cost computers so they don't break theirs. I think when I was younger I cause quite a bit of fresh installs, and my brothers have too! :laugh:
     
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  3. tkpenalty New Member

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    Does Intel not realise that its balantly obvious that PCs for children so young is detrimental to their psychological and possibly physical health? Don't they? I'm only 15 and I can already see what a bad choice it is to allow children so young to readily rely on PCs. A Primary school student will never need the computer to assist with their education. At most the school will be enough for these kinds of things, unless under some special circumstances.

    Prohibiting use of computers unless neccessary until like the age of 10~11 is the best option in my opinion. Or else you will just end up with a child that will most probably have behavioural problems.

    What will the children do with these PCs? Play games on them! Play all day!

    Intel wants to be generous, but they also want to make a profit out of this. This isnt exactly what I would call being honest and something that should be looked down on.

    Intel Leap Backwards
     
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  4. kaneda

    kaneda

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    I'm 16 and Idisagree. Due to the fact you used the term primary school im presuming you are from the U.K. If you look at education as a whole you dont learn anything worthwhile, primary school is probably the last time you learn anything fundamental to your life. Access to the internet would allow young minds to have access to a bastion of information far greater than that they have in school. You are right in saying they will probably spend most of their time playing games, but with my own knowledge of school, especially in this country i can safely say most of the time, gaming has more use, atleast its fun.If youre going to take the position you just did then let me say this, education needs a reform, the things you learn in them are mostly pointless up until the age of 14/15. Once you hit 14/15 you've already wasted 3 years when you are most able to learn and take in information. Given access to the internet and computers at a younger age will promote self learning - aswell as gaming yes- but still, self learning even if the percentage is small.

    Preventing information to be given to those craving it should be classed as a crime against humanity. The internet doesnt do anything more than break social and racial conformities which are present in the real world, on the internet you are free to say and do whatever you want without fear of prosecution. You might say " theyre only 10 what could they possibly do whats worth prosecuting". With governments as they are at the moment you will be prosecuted for anything they deem illegal, unfortunatly what they deem illegal , piracy and the such i and many others deem as morally just. giving insane amount of money to the man doesnt do anything more than worsen the worlds status, especially in western society. Times have changedm in the 21st century amost every job there is will have interaction with the internet and computers. Personally id much rather employ someone who has had procifient experience using a computer than someone who has had well, the education you get in secondary schools regarding computing/IT(which is a complete joke).

    Intel should be thanked for bringing new hopefuls to the IT and computing industries aswell as to other industries such the media industry and e-commerce, etc. all of these will benefit from young minds gaining access to the net.


    bringing new hopefuls into the world of /b/ is also a plus :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2008
  5. mdm-adph

    mdm-adph New Member

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    Just go to disagree on a small point there -- I doubt that Intel is even going to make a profit on these things, since they'll more than likely be giving the damn things away, just to undercut the OLPC's efforts. The creation of this "Classmate PC" has a lot to do with Intel being initially snubbed by that organization in lieu of AMD's Geode chip. ;)
     
  6. [I.R.A]_FBi

    [I.R.A]_FBi

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    there is a generation behind me who doesnt know how to use a library, how to do multiplication without a computer or a calculator, and thats bad, you should know how to do it then u use the computer as a learning aid, or something to verify ur right if its something simple instead of leaning on it fully.
     
  7. kaneda

    kaneda

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    erm, you learn all of what you said in KS2(ages 6-11) in primary school...

    Personally i find school easy and boring, so i do most of my learning via the internet(get better results than most in my class for it aswell). the thing is, the educational system in my country (U.K.) is useless. the things you learn are common sense to the majority. IMHO schools should focus more on work based education allowing students to practise and develope skills used in the real world instead of knowing how to balance a chemical equations or find the area of a circle. if more students(children) to the net then those said children would be open to the largest source of information available during the time where they are most adapt at learning.
     
  8. mdm-adph

    mdm-adph New Member

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    So? Do you know how to use a loom to make your own cloth, grind up grain to make flour for bread, or create your own soap out of the fat of slain animals?

    Yet, I'm sure you wear clothes, eat bread, and take a bath, don't you? ;)

    Each generation has a whole new set of "essential" things to learn. It's not so far-fetched a belief to say that it's very important for third-world children to learn how to use a computer.
     
  9. [I.R.A]_FBi

    [I.R.A]_FBi

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    im notr saying its essential, but dont forget what was there before you came.
     
  10. panchoman

    panchoman Sold my stars!

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    WTF, they look like toys...
     
  11. adrianx New Member

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    look like toys for kids :) between 3-6 years old :D
     
  12. DaedalusHelios

    DaedalusHelios

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    I was raised on computers and I never had behavioral problems. :laugh:

    I am 23. :)
     
  13. DaedalusHelios

    DaedalusHelios

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    I know how to do those things, minus the grain part. Its survival skills. I hope they are solar powered. :laugh:
     
  14. DaedalusHelios

    DaedalusHelios

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    Actually I bet Intel is doing it for the profit angle. Thats why they left OLPC. Thats what the leader of the OLPC organization said.

    They didn't opt for the Geode until Intel gave notice that it was leaving the board. The Atom was the first choice by OLPC, but AMD didn't emphasize on profiting from the project(they just wanted good press most likely).

    Geode = weak performance and incredibly low power consumption(ideal for solar power)

    Atom = much better performance and low power consumption

    I would prefer the Atom. The third world would do better with solar powered units in areas without electricity.
     

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