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is this safe?

Discussion in 'Networking & Security' started by subhendu, Dec 5, 2009.

  1. subhendu

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    Is it safe to connect internet with out Ethernet cards....by using motherboards port?

    some told me that it will kill my mobo...is this true...?

    i really want to free one of my pci slot...please advice asap
     
  2. erocker

    erocker Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Someone is lying to you lol. Why do you think there are ethernet ports on motherboards? I haven't used a pci ethernet card since I started buying motherboards with the ports on them. Of course it's safe to use.
     
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  3. Kreij

    Kreij Senior Monkey Moderator Staff Member

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    Integrated ethernet port on a motherboard is the same as using a PCI card.
    There is nothing less safe about using it.
    What determines your safety is if you have anti-virus/anti-malware/firewall software.
     
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  4. [Ion]

    [Ion] WCG Team Assistant

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    This is perfectly safe, I use the ethernet ports on all of my mobos :p
     
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  5. DirectorC

    DirectorC New Member

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    Well I figure if a surge were to hit the cable modem and is powerful enough to go through the Ethernet cable to the motherboard then you'd be looking at higher chances of a failed motherboard than with an Ethernet card.

    But as long as everything is connected to a surge protector you're safe.
     
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  6. THRiLL KiLL

    THRiLL KiLL

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    i highly doubt that would happen, and if it did, im sure everything else in the house would spike to =)
     
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  7. Kreij

    Kreij Senior Monkey Moderator Staff Member

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    If an electrical surge happens, unless you have some type of surge protections (and that is not 100% reliable) the fact that you are using a card vs. a mobo connection will give you little protection.

    The ethernet card may fail epically enough to stop the surge, but given the rate the surge is moving along, the odds of it getting through the card and onto the PCI/PCI-E bus is still great.

    There is no good reason to feel that a discreet card is safer than an integrated port.
     
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  8. DirectorC

    DirectorC New Member

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    I know it's unlikely, but in 15 years of troubleshooting I've seen the craziest shit.
     
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  9. exodusprime1337

    exodusprime1337

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    if the surger were to hit a dedicated card, i can almost see it doing about the same if not more damage than if it hit the onboard card, really the only true differences is where they are connected, onboard is a pci card on the board essentially, and dedicated is connected through the same bus the onboard one is in. I can honestly see this doing the exact same amount of damage.. just my opinion though
     
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  10. DirectorC

    DirectorC New Member

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    Well they can do varying amounts. A card can fry by itself, take out the slot it was on, or take out parts of the board or the entire thing. It's just more likely with a cable plugged in directly onto the motherboard that damage could be done to it.
     
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  11. subhendu

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    guys thanks....how do i connect it to a surge protector...do we need any software for this???please advice
     
  12. animal007uk

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    this thread reminded me of a very old tiny pc i had think it was a pentium 2 333mhz.

    Our flat got hit by lightening and the pc turned itself of so i checked it over and all seemed ok powered it up and it worked fine apart from the internet, after a very close examination of the 56k modem i noticed one of chips had a crack in it, no burn marks or anything just a crack.

    replaced the card and all was back to normal so i think most pc's can withstand so much before they pop.
     
  13. pantherx12

    pantherx12

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    Surge connector is one of those things with lots of plugs, just google seach surge protector on shopping mode : ]

    Sometimes you can buy them with thousands of pounds of insurance on them so if someone a surge does happen your covered.
     
  14. animal007uk

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    some of them surge protectors are useless because when you finaly read the small print it says it wont cover a lightening strike :( well thats here in the uk not sure if its same anywere else

     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2009
  15. hat

    hat Enthusiast

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    You should get a surge protector with not only electrical ports but with coaxial cable hookup too. A surge could come through coaxial cable, hit your modem and start frying stuff from there.
     
  16. pantherx12

    pantherx12

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    Personally I don't bother, fuse normally burns out in the plug as soon as surge happens.
     
  17. subhendu

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    i have apc 1.1kv ups. it has surge protector ...is this for internet ?
     
  18. 3870x2

    3870x2

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    The chances of a power surge through ethernet are very unlikely to damage a motherboard. The pathways that connect would break, in very much the same way a fuse would break, and for the same reason. If a power surge were to kill your motherboard, it would be through the PSU.

    While this may not be true according to some ethernet adaptors, cable modems, and the media that connects them, you would probably have a better chance of the lightning striking your computer directly.
     
  19. subhendu

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    is there any way to connect my internet to my ups surge?
     
  20. 3870x2

    3870x2

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    there are surge protectors that have RJ-45 jacks in them, yes. pretty much in the same way they have seat belts in a NASA shuttle, and close-range wild bear repellent spray.
     
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  21. subhendu

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    good thanks guys for all your help...really helped me....Thank u very much :toast:
     
  22. pantherx12

    pantherx12

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    Yeah just having your computer and modem plugged into a surge protector is more then enough.
     
  23. westom

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    That is ridiculous. But it demonstrates why a majority promote myths.

    How does that power strip protector stop what three miles of sky cannot stop? That is what most have just claimed. How does the 2 cm part inside that protector stop a surge? It does not - obviously. Did anyone view its numeric specs? Even the manufacturer does not claim that protection in numbers.

    How does a few hundred joules absorb surges that are hundreds of thousands of joules. The naive may say, "My protector sacrificed itself to save my computer." Reality. Protection inside the appliance protected electronics. A surge too small to overwhelm appliance protection, instead, destroyed a grossly undersized protection. Grossly undersized so that the naive will recommend it.

    Surge protection is about where energy gets dissipated. Either you earth a surge before it can enter the building. Or that surge does hunting for earth destructively via appliances. Your choice. Either spend about $1 per protected appliance for the solution that has been standard for over 100 years. Or spend tens or 100 times more money for a power strip protector that does not even claim that protection.

    So me. Show me the power strip protector specifications that claim protection from each type of surge? How to get the naive to recommend highly profitable and ineffective protectors? Grossly undersized it so that it will fail. Then the naive will recommend more. Or hype a big buck warranty. A free market principle: a larger warranty indicates the worst products.

    Only more responsible companies manufacture the solution that has been used for over 100 years. General Electric, Siemens, Keison, Intermatic, Polyphaser, Square D, and Leviton are but a few more responsible companies. The Cutler-Hammer solution sells in Lowes for less than $50. But again, a protector is only as effective as its earth ground. 'Whole house' protectors have a dedicated earthing wire for that 'less than 10 foot' connection. Why? A protector is only as effective as its earth ground.

    So why do ineffective plug-in protector not even list protection in its numeric specs? Because so many will recommend something only on half truths. Myths promoted because the $3 power strip with some ten cent protector parts sells for $25 or $150 - and gets recommended by an overwhelming majority who never demand spec numbers.

    The effective surge protection means nobody knows a surge even existed. We earth a minimally sized 'whole house' protector so that even direct lightnings strikes do not damage the protector.
     

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