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James Webb Space Telescope News

CAPSLOCKSTUCK

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James Webb Space Telescope has completed its nearly 100-day testing series in the cryogenic vacuum chamber, where temperatures dip hundreds of degrees below the freezing point.

The team unsealed the 40-ton door of Chamber A on Saturday, marking the end of a critical test stage ahead of the telescope’s launch.

The vault-like door was closed off on July 10, allowing researchers to assess the telescope’s optics and instruments all together in conditions simulating deep space





Inside the chamber, the telescope was cooled with liquid nitrogen and cold gaseous helium.

To detect infrared light from faraway objects, the telescope must be kept very cold, according to NASA.

The James Webb Telescope and most of its instruments have an operating temperature of roughly 40 Kelvin – about minus 387 Fahrenheit (minus 233 Celsius).

But, the mid-infrared instrument (MIRI) must be kept even colder.

This instrument uses a cryocooler to keep it below 7 Kelvin, or minus 447 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 266 degrees Celsius).

This summer’s tests were designed to see how the optical telescope and integrated science instrument module (OTIS) operated in the cold vacuum environment.







The 18 gold primary mirror segments were tested as well, to ensure they act as a single mirror.

The engineers began cooling the chamber on July 20 after removing the air. The process that took roughly 30 days; then the telescope remained in a cryo-stable state for another 30 days. The team began to warm the chamber back up on September 27, before pumping air back in.

Then, on November 18, they unsealed the door.
 

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The $8.8 billion (£6.5bn) telescope has been successfully tested in a giant vacuum chamber at the Johnson Space Centre - proving it will function in deep space.

Engineers are now confident it will be able to capture starlight in focus and track astronomical targets describing the completion of tests as a 'significant milestone'


1515698300892.png


The James Webb Telescope and most of its instruments have an operating temperature of roughly 40 Kelvin – about minus 387 Fahrenheit (minus 233 Celsius).
the mid-infrared instrument (MIRI) must be kept even colder. This instrument uses a cryocooler to keep it below 7 Kelvin, or minus 447 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 266 degrees Celsius).


Inside the chamber, the team monitored the telescope using thermal sensors and specialised cameras, to track the temperature and the physical position as each component moved.

‘After 15 years of planning, chamber refurbishment, hundreds of hours of risk-reduction testing, the dedication of more than 100 individuals through more than 90 days of testing, and surviving Hurricane Harvey, the OTIS cryogenic test has been an outstanding success,’ said Dr Ochs.

The engineers began cooling the chamber on July 20 after removing the air.

The process that took roughly 30 days; then the telescope remained in a cryo-stable state for another 30 days.


1515698460158.png
 

W1zzard

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successfully tested in a giant vacuum chamber at the Johnson Space Centre
Yeah that was right during Hurricane Harvey. Engineers staid behind to ensure the cooldown process wasn't interrupted
 
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Still over a year to launch. Eagerly waiting for the engineers to get this into space and handover a fully operational device. The wait has been painfully long.
 
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In another potential setback to the James Webb Space Telescope program, engineers found some parts that came off the spacecraft after recent environmental testing. The parts were “screws and washers” but they apparently came from the main bus and complex sun shield. NASA is assessing to determine if there will be any further change to the current launch target of approximately May 2020.

http://spacenews.com/jwst-suffers-new-problem-during-spacecraft-testing/
 
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In another potential setback to the James Webb Space Telescope program, engineers found some parts that came off the spacecraft after recent environmental testing. The parts were “screws and washers” but they apparently came from the main bus and complex sun shield. NASA is assessing to determine if there will be any further change to the current launch target of approximately May 2020.

http://spacenews.com/jwst-suffers-new-problem-during-spacecraft-testing/
Why are there screws and washers... shouldn't vast majority of all this be welded together at fine levels of detail...
 
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Why are there screws and washers... shouldn't vast majority of all this be welded together at fine levels of detail...
i believe its because welds are more susceptible to cracking in this case because of the design.
 
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W1zzard

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