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James Webb Space Telescope News

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JWST is Folded for Final Testing


That was a fantastic demonstration at the end. I didn't realize how far out it would be. Very cool. So if we see light sources 16+ billion lightyears away, does that mean big bang theory is ******? lol
 

ARF

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That was a fantastic demonstration at the end. I didn't realize how far out it would be. Very cool. So if we see light sources 16+ billion lightyears away, does that mean big bang theory is ******? lol

Probably it means that the Universe is older than the expected by the BB Theory.

But its start is further delayed, now for Q4 2021 as earliest.

James Webb Space Telescope Delayed Again to October 31, 2021
 
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Probably it means that the Universe is older than the expected by the BB Theory.

But its start is further delayed, now for Q4 2021 as earliest.

James Webb Space Telescope Delayed Again to October 31, 2021


dang... october 2021... this really does make me sad.
 

ARF

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NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope Completes Final Functional Tests to Prepare for Launch​


Let's keep our fingers crossed to have a successful mission later this year.
 

ARF

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NASA’s upcoming James Webb Space Telescope has the ability to observe this exoplanet. Webb’s infrared vision may allow scientists to see down to the planet’s surface. “If there are magma pools or volcanism going on, those areas will be hotter,” explained Swain. “That will generate more emission, and so they’ll be looking potentially at the actual geologic activity—which is exciting!”

The team’s findings will be published in an upcoming issue of The Astronomical Journal.
 

ARF

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NASA’s new space telescope has had a rough go. Name a problem, and this telescope—meant to be the most powerful of its kind, a worthy successor to the famous Hubble—has faced it: poor management, technical errors, budget overruns, schedule delays, and a pandemic. So, naturally, the people responsible for the telescope’s safety are now thinking about pirates.

The topic came up at a recent meeting about NASA’s James Webb space telescope, named for a former administrator of the space agency. Later this year, the telescope will travel by ship to a launch site in South America, passing through the Panama Canal to reach French Guiana. Webb, with a mirror as tall as a two-story building and a protective shield the size of a tennis court, is too large for a plane. Its departure date will be kept secret, someone said at the meeting, to protect against pirates who might want to capture the precious cargo and hold it for ransom. Christopher Conselice, an astrophysicist at the University of Manchester who attended the meeting, was at first baffled by the concern because, well, pirates, but it quickly clicked.

“Why would you announce that you’re going to be shipping on a certain day something that is worth over $10 billion,” he explained to me, “that you could easily put in a boat” and sail away with?

 

ARF

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Is it really too big for a plane?
I think if it fits in the cargo space of a rocket, then it definitely should fit in one of the larger cargo planes, too!
 

ARF

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PSO J318.5-22 is quite a peculiar object: It’s a rogue planet — it orbits no star — but it has the characteristics (age and low mass) of young planets found around other stars.
Astronomers believe this mystery is a case for the James Webb Space Telescope. One of Webb’s programs will take spectroscopic observations of this “orphan planet” to characterize its atmosphere.
Learn more about how Webb will study exoplanets: https://bit.ly/3addSCm
Top: Image by N. Metcalfe / Pan-STARRS 1 Science Consortium.
Bottom: Artists' impression by MPIA / V. Ch. Quetz

1617043012958.png



1617043043827.png


NASA's James Webb Space Telescope | Facebook
 
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That was a fantastic demonstration at the end. I didn't realize how far out it would be. Very cool. So if we see light sources 16+ billion lightyears away, does that mean big bang theory is ******? lol
To be fair, the theory of the big bang does not actually define the age of the universe, only the mechanism of it's creation. The math that predicts the age is based on the expansion and acceleration rates observed thus far. However there are still a lot of questions that need to be answered. We still don't know how big the universe actually is because the central region of the universe can not directly be observed as we have expanded and continue to accelerate away from it. On the other side, we can not observe the outer edge of the universe because it has expanded away from us and continues to accelerate further. Relative to our position, we are moving away from the center region of the universe at a speed greater than light. Therefore, light from the region will never reach us as we are accelerating away to quickly. Likewise the same dynamic exists in relation to the outer edge of the universe.

One of the more interesting aspects of study with the JWT that will hopefully show results is evidence of what is being playfully called "Red Shift Blink". This is a prediction that as the expansion of the universe continues, galaxies on the outer edge of the observable universe will, as we accelerate away, red shift into the extreme reach of the EMR specturm and will then blink out as that galaxy moves out of our observational range.

The ballpark estimate of 13.8 billion years is based on information that is a bit dated at this point in our understanding of the universe.
 
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To be fair, the theory of the big bang does not actually define the age of the universe, only the mechanism of it's creation. The math that predicts the age is based on the expansion and acceleration rates observed thus far. However there are still a lot of questions that need to be answered. We still don't know how big the universe actually is because the central region of the universe can not directly be observed as we have expanded and continue to accelerate away from it. On the other side, we can not observe the outer edge of the universe because it has expanded away from us and continues to accelerate further. Relative to our position, we are moving away from the center region of the universe at a speed greater than light. Therefore, light from the region will never reach us as we are accelerating away to quickly. Likewise the same dynamic exists in relation to the outer edge of the universe.

One of the more interesting aspects of study with the JWT that will hopefully show results is evidence of what is being playfully called "Red Shift Blink". This is a prediction that as the expansion of the universe continues, galaxies on the outer edge of the observable universe will, as we accelerate away, red shift into the extreme reach of the EMR specturm and will then blink out as that galaxy moves out of our observational range.

The ballpark estimate of 13.8 billion years is based on information that is a bit dated at this point in our understanding of the universe.

A) If I had a robot that somehow was powered forever
B) placed robot in rocket that somehow never ran out of fuel
C) launched rocket and waited 5 trillion years
D) would there actually be an edge to the Universe the robot would discover? would it hit a brick wall? if so, who made the brick wall, why can't I get around it?
E) it seems like the universe is infinite
F) the grades I got in high school, so I don't know
G) now sing the alphabet song with me

:laugh:
 
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D) would there actually be an edge to the Universe the robot would discover?
Yes. However you would need to find a way to exceed the speed of light to reach it. It is theoretically possible, we humans just haven't figured it out...yet.
would it hit a brick wall?
No. But it would hit what is theoried to be a very high energy barrier, the outwardly expanding blast wave of the big bang.
why can't I get around it?
It should be possible to get through such a region of space, but one theory posits that you would only find empty space until you were to reach the inward falling event horizon of the original black hole our universe once was. After that it is thought that one would see the the rest of the Cosmos at large.
E) it seems like the universe is infinite
It only seems that way. However, if you were to find a way to throw time in reverse, everything we can see would fall back into a single point in space outside our current observational range.
 

ARF

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Yes. However you would need to find a way to exceed the speed of light to reach it. It is theoretically possible, we humans just haven't figured it out...yet.

No. We have figured it out - it's called time travel and teleportation, either through holes in the space-time fabric.

To be fair, the theory of the big bang does not actually define the age of the universe, only the mechanism of it's creation. The math that predicts the age is based on the expansion and acceleration rates observed thus far. However there are still a lot of questions that need to be answered. We still don't know how big the universe actually is because the central region of the universe can not directly be observed as we have expanded and continue to accelerate away from it. On the other side, we can not observe the outer edge of the universe because it has expanded away from us and continues to accelerate further. Relative to our position, we are moving away from the center region of the universe at a speed greater than light. Therefore, light from the region will never reach us as we are accelerating away to quickly. Likewise the same dynamic exists in relation to the outer edge of the universe.

One of the more interesting aspects of study with the JWT that will hopefully show results is evidence of what is being playfully called "Red Shift Blink". This is a prediction that as the expansion of the universe continues, galaxies on the outer edge of the observable universe will, as we accelerate away, red shift into the extreme reach of the EMR specturm and will then blink out as that galaxy moves out of our observational range.

The ballpark estimate of 13.8 billion years is based on information that is a bit dated at this point in our understanding of the universe.


I think it's much more important to observe the nearby planets for suitable living conditions, and then travel to there to see if there are other forms of life.

The Universe is too large for our small brains to even have the imagination for what it actually is!
 
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Closely tracking the JWST status and there may be another delay to it's launch later this year. This time it's not the fault of the telescope itself! Here's a great recap:
 
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Highly recommend Dr. Becky... she talks with an actual person working on the project. Excellent watch.
 
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This happened yesterday.
Destin being his usual smart self..
 
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So one week ago tomorrow my grandpa died, and we were looking forward to the JWST launch, we have talked about it a few times over the years but it kept getting delayed.

Was really hoping he would have made it long enough for the first images to come back. I remember installing astronomy starchart software on his PC in like the early 2000's. lol

Launch day for JWST is going to be a very emotional day for me.
 
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