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Korean mom meeting and say goodbye to her deceased daughter one last time in VR

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First world problems are funny and this will only make the process of grief longer.

1 week before my father died the last words from me: you are an asshole i hate ya - i hate myself to this day for this since 30 years but i was young and dumb and now i only think of the good moments without VR or something creepy.

next is they implement ya a good memory in your brain.
 
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Apparently because people always wait for Neon signs and you always hear they never saw things coming or getting worse.
I'm going to go completely off tangent here, and a lot of what I'm about to say isn't directed at you, though you helped trigger the thoughts. I can see you're not just out to make sweeping generalizations. I just want to make it clear that I'm not trying to put words in your mouth or necessarily trying to criticize your view in itself. I don't even ask that you read it! Though I'd be interested to hear what anybody who happens to thinks, with the original topic still fresh in everyone's heads. It's all related. Still gonna toss it in a spoiler. If I wasn't too sick to fall asleep, this post wouldn't exist to plug-up this thread :laugh:

Oh, and I think what you said about the causal one-time dealeo being definitive in any way was spot-on. It drives me crazy, how willing people are to do that with every new thing. And then 6 months later we wear it out, never knowing if it was worth it or not. I'd rather we didn't take this and run in either direction. We ruin everything we touch with that shit. If you take any of what I say, take that, please! I also suspect that the cost probably will, for a long time, prohibit something like this from being widespread, but who knows what tomorrow's tech will hold for us. 10 years from now that may no longer be so. Seems to be the progression of things. I don't really know. Annnnyway...
I doubt that people fully expect the signs to always be obvious and easy. Sometimes people do expect that, though..We've all seen the news stories where somebody snaps and does something crazy and everyone says they never knew, but as the evidence comes out you can't help but think it should've been picked up on, because the pattern looks clear when it's all laid out. There have been times when I saw just one or two things and thought "How could anybody not know?" and then there were 10 more things... that does happen. It seems like they waited to long. But sometimes I wonder if that's what we all just want to think, because if that's the case, it should be easy to solve.

But then, even in my own experience that's not always true. It's messier from the inside and things aren't spelled out linearly. Not all of the relevant info registers. When my friend took his own life, nobody saw it coming. He truly was the last person you would ever expect to do something like that. To this day, nobody has any idea why he did it. Not a single person near him had any inkling that he was suffering in such an overt way, let alone that he would do something that would rock our whole community and bring an end to all of the good he did. It was just so unlike the person any of us knew him as. If anything, it would be you who was down and out and it would be him who was guiding you through it! If any of us had that first inkling and we REALLY looked, we might have seen a pattern, but even in hindsight nobody was able to unravel it. I really wish I knew. I'd rather know that it was something I could've stopped than not know at all. At least that's something I can take and use for the betterment of myself and others. Would've helped a lot with finding closure, too. Always wondering why sucks, and I probably always will on some level.

My best friend for most of my life also has many very deep issues, going back to his childhood. In spite of spending so much time with him and genuinely wanting to know him and be there for him, it wasn't until we got older that he started willingly showing cracks and opening up. With him, you kind of always knew, but the way that he masked it made trying to figure out what the problems even were or how to deal with them like pulling teeth. You could hope he would open up and give some sort of clue as to what could be done, but that generally went nowhere. Try to talk and he shuts down. And forget forcing him to do anything. You'd never get another chance. All I could really do was address whatever jumped out and maintain a demeanor of being open to things... just trying to keep that trust and hope that one day he sees the value of it. He finally has, but it took some life-changing events for him to be ready to trust anybody in that way. I now know things about him that nobody else does - vital things to know about him if you ever hope to help. But the only reason I do is because he decided he wanted me to. Otherwise I'd be as clueless as everyone else, with pretty much no way to find out. You may sense that something is wrong. Doesn't mean you can help... or would want to.

My own mother has always been a bit strange, but not overtly so. She went most of her life with nobody suspecting there was anything wrong with her. She had a different personality, but she never seemed at all unhappy and lead a successful life. I remember her being a good mother and wife, always working hard, never shirking from responsibility, always in-tune with things. Her, my father and I learned together what she was going through only a couple of years ago. In reality she is a full-blown manic-depressive and it was just a matter of things drawing the bad side of it out. Even she was not aware of issues that would lead to bad outcomes for her - until they did and it started to become a theme. Before then, nobody would've said any of her habits or attitudes were unhealthy, or even inconsistent. Looking back, it makes more sense. But back then, it really didn't. Even professionals failed to see it. It took seeing many to finally figure out what was going on and what worked. In the meantime, things sort of were what they were and it was one day at a time. Sometimes things happen and it can't be helped. Not something I'm happy admitting but that is the truth. Hindsight is always 20/20. Too bad that's often the best we have.

Point is, it's not always that black and white. Were there maybe things I could've done in these instances? Things I should've paid attention to? I do think about things like that. I register guilt over that and I'm definitely not above acknowledging my own flaws and responsibility for my role. But I think most people simply aren't up to holding people to everything... most people will fail to hold to themselves at some point. I don't think people in general are capable of being perceptive enough to always see the signs. Everybody has their own problems. And even if they are doing fine, what might be a problem for you might not be a problem for me. And there is only so much wherewithal a person can put to unraveling the psyches of people close to them. It's insurmountable. A little can go a long way. But on it's own that will never be enough. You're never going to know each and every weakness the people around you have, any more than they may know their own.

I agree that people should at least try to pay more attention and not shy away from the darker side of things. It's an important part of this whole deal that we're severely lacking in. We're whitewashing and it's a problem. But to me that's a smaller piece of it than it seems to be for others. I think it seems bigger because that's what literally everyone is focusing on right now. If they are aware of one societal issue regarding mental health, it's that. Unfortunately, that's where it stops for a lot of people. You have people who think we only need more positivity and acceptance. And then you have people who only think that people are too self-deluded to actually cope, without being aware of or caring for how many shades of gray there actually are. People just want it to be simpler than it is.

We also haven't been hip to the idea that mental health is important for very long. Right now we're on kind of this feel-good ride as people are becoming open to it for the first time and realizing that they don't have to suffer in the ways they have indefinitely... so they jump on from the quickest, easiest point. It's immediately appealing. Something people want to have very badly, and just as badly do not want to feel is being taken from them. I think for the time being, many people are only capable of engaging with it on a superficial level, but I don't get the impression that anybody is caught under the assumption that they are magically made better by things that simply feel good. A person may just not want to deal with it and rationalize putting it off for a long time, but you never truly forget what you're actually dealing with. You always know that's what you're doing. If you don't, you're about to be reminded. Try to avoid it and it bites back hard. Oftentimes people try to remind themselves and stay on a good path, but still falter. It's a constant up and down that I wonder if we'll ever succeed in truly separating ourselves from. Not saying people shouldn't try. You kind of have to try. But I think a component of deeper understanding is sorely needed, from both crowds. Some things a person just has to learn on their own. Deny them that opportunity at their peril. But you can't claim to be helping them knowing that's what you're doing. It just becomes a different kind of self-serving. The "I know you better than you know yourself because I do not have the same problems." kind of self-serving. It's no less ugly.

A lot of people, I think, still don't know how to talk about it or what to look for. And again what makes it all the more difficult is the fact that the signs can be very subtle, sometimes even not manifesting at all. Quite often, what would be normal behavior for one person may be the start of a bad progression for someone else. And what may be one person's poison is the only thing that can save another. Everything to do with the mind sits on a plethora of spectra and degrees.

People naturally seek things that make them feel better. And it does serve a utility. There is always going to be a need. It's not inherently bad. Depression and anxiety, for example are part of a cycle of gradually reinforcing negative thoughts and sensations. Every little thing is a brick in the wall. Over time, it even becomes physical and can sidestep mind-over-matter. Your body becomes physically predisposed to misfiring the mechanisms that cause a fear response. It becomes difficult, if not impossible to self-regulate simply by attacking the mental side. It is truly crippling.

But if you can do something to break one or two of those bricks along the way, the wall gets a little weaker. Even something superficial can occasionally serve this role, so long as the superficiality is acknowledged by the person utilizing it. Anything that can aid you in that process has the capability to be an asset to you, including the fluffy stuff. The same processes that break people down over time also play-out in reverse with people becoming more fulfilled. Individually those little positive experiences might be inconsequential and in fact are never going to be the one thing that 'fixes' you, but in the bigger picture, every little bit still helps. The mistake people on both sides make is making more out of the little bits than what they are. We either glorify it or completely dismiss it.


I think you highlighted something people also need to be aware of, though. A person needs to be able to temper those activities with reality and realize that although they may feel better in the moment, it can't be the be-all, end-all, lest you wind up back in the same place not expecting to be there. There's no shame, but also no glory in placating yourself for a while. It's not that people simply can't have things like this, or that we shouldn't encourage each other to do things that feel good when the walls are closing in. What we need to do away with is the idea of that being the singular means to an end, as well as the idea that because someone engages in a placating activity that THEY themselves must see it that way. Accountability is a problem, too. People should hold themselves accountable for their own choices regarding mental heath, but that doesn't mean it's on anybody else to decide what they should or shouldn't do, implicitly.

You can question what people do and put out there and we should all honor that - its a dialogue I'd like to see taking place more than it does, but at the same time it seems as though people are quickly forgetting that the close-mindedness which has made it impossible to broach mental health with any real transparency isn't that far off from the questioning often done of the fluff movement now. People don't distinquish well between perfectly healthy coping and problem habits. They lump it together. Besides that, sometimes you may want to help someone and may indeed know a better way, but sometimes you simply cannot be the one. They may indeed be deluding themselves. But if that is the case, confronting the delusion head-on often leads to doubling-down. In trying to be the one to help fix someone who doesn't want it, you can wind-up hindering them, failing to see how things really are for them until it is too late - not seeing the forest for the trees. There are just too many exceptions when it comes to mental health for your average person to always be stepping in. People want to understand it and be on top of it, but both camps take it too far. Responses are HUGELY exaggerated these days, but to me that largely masks the fact that sometimes it truly is not appropriate to interfere and only serves to muddle the water. Eventually it winds up devolving into these really ugly, self-important talks, with one group putting itself above the other, just like we always have.

People get ahead of themselves in their (I think, largely well-intended) opposition of this (also well-intended) positivity deal just as often as people rush to the positivity in the first place. It is getting worse, as both sides ramp-up in response to one another. I can't help but think we're leaving each other out and forgetting what mental health awareness is supposed to be about. It's become another one of those debates that people have just to have.


To me, positive coping is all about context. In the context of a wider approach to dealing with the grief... other methods used in tandem, something like this is probably fine. Human beings have trouble existing only as long-term creatures. Sometimes we need little breaks and escapes just to keep focus. The best attitude towards and plans for the future cannot guarantee successful relinquishment from things breaking someone down in the present. Sometimes you have to let it go for the day, allow yourself to feel better for a while, and pick it up again tomorrow. That's part of it, too. It doesn't matter what's at the end of the road if along the way you become too weak to continue. It takes both modes of operating to really make it. I think sometimes people forget all of the things they did to placate when they make it to the other side. But we all do it. And there are reasons for why we distract ourselves in those ways. Nobody is a fortress. Sometimes people even realize they are not as far along as they could or should be, and feeling the guilt, knowing people will hold them responsible, hide away. They're as scared as ever of being singled out as weak and met with criticism they can't process from the point they're at. And then you wind up with someone who's been struggling for years and what do people say to that when it starts to show? "You shouldn't have done that. You should have done this. Stop doing that. I did this and I am fine. That guy did that and look at him. This is all on you." True or not doesn't matter at that point because you are hitting them where it hurts and then wondering why they get defensive. It's not an honest conversation anymore. Hell, I see more people taking satisfaction in prodding it than actually doing anything productive about it.

And yet people wonder why so many others cling to this delusional positivity and try to mask the fact they are not actually coping and may not even know how or believe that they can do it. Because they are afraid that someone will look at them and say "This is what is wrong with the world."


There's just no insight to it. No meaningful perspective. Again it isn't always about determinably wrong or right matters. It is about the outcome. The outcome of trying to be right about the issues hasn't done any good. It hasn't changed what most people would agree is wrong at all. There is no setting a person straight on caring for their own mind. Consider this VR thing (and many other things people do to placate) as a crutch. If you rely on a crutch continuously, you will atrophy and be unable to walk without it. But at the same time, if your legs are really that damaged and you refuse to use the crutch, simply because other people didn't need it, or people typically don't use one, you may never walk properly again. Years later, you will still have to live with that. Sometimes to heal, you have to spend some time off of it. So long as that isn't all you do, it's beneficial. There are no hard rules to this process, no givens as far as time goes. Some people heal very quickly. Others never seem to fully heal. Even doing the same things. Just because one person has a strong need to placate at times and one doesn't, doesn't make either one more right.

One person may be into the later stages of grief in just a month. Another may still be stuck in an early phase years later. The natural thing to wonder is, "what was it about either of them that made it that way?" But that is tricky business. If anybody actually knew, there would be no debate. The sad reality is that you can wind up alienating the latter person and blaming them for things that may not entirely be their fault. Historically, this has been a plague to mental health since we first started looking into it. It's what led people to become outcasts and be denied of any means to contribute and subjugated to a life of subjugated, simply for having different needs. There is much about the human experience that is still not well understood. It's daunting to draw a line between what is and isn't a meaningful comparison. It doesn't mean you have to encourage behaviors you deem unhealthy. It just means you have to know when to step outside of yourself and realize that it may not be about what you think is right for other people.

Now, we have the opposite of how that's supposed to work, where everything is immediately legitimized. But the answer to that isn't total opposition. That would just be going back to the old status quo. As with many issues of the times, I feel we are having the wrong conversations. We are in too much of a hurry for the answers. Everyone thinks they know, so nobody can agree and nothing worthwhile gets done. Nobody really learns anything. The research continues, but on average everyone else remains in the dark.

The biggest problem I see in mental health discussions happening these days are all of these quick-incision, absolute declarations of 'this is always bad' or 'this is always good.' I think people should try to weather everything they can without help, when they are able to. Our ability to withstand bad experiences is similar to physical strength in how it needs to be kept up. But sometimes it pays to admit to yourself that you're not as strong as you wish you were and allow yourself some temporary relief. Forgive yourself for not being strong enough and make a promise to try again. I wanna put a big emphasis on the temporary part. If you tear a muscle, you need to rest. But at some point not much later you will need to start working to get the strength back and do some painful things to encourage it to finish healing. That, however, doesn't make the rest periods any less necessary. What's the saying? "In all things, moderation."

We are definitely lacking that, but the common opposition I see to people's notions of positivity are equally off-base, in my estimation. Neither approach has ever worked how it was said it would or should. Which to me only goes to show that none of us know as much as we might like to think we do about what it means to be a person. We know much of our own experience going through changes, but it always falls apart whenever someone tries to take that and apply it outside of themselves. Doesn't stop people from continually trying down that path, though.

Another analogy. Band-aids can be helpful in warding off infection and protecting wounds... often they also provide a little relief from the pain of a cut. They don't on their own make the wound go away. But that doesn't mean they shouldn't ever be used... just that there needs to be an understanding of what they can and can't do before using them.

FWIW I think we do put too much emphasis on these feel good things. Many times people seem more concerned with being made to feel that they are better in the moment than actually being better. I just don't think that's necessarily a problem with the means, but rather how they are used. But as a general rule I think we still have to be able to believe that we will make the right calls for each other and for ourselves. If we can't even have that baseline level of faith in people, we're all screwed. A big part of dealing with it is accepting that we are all human and these sorts of things are just an unavoidable part of our existence. Our methods are never going to be perfect and all we can really do is just the best we can with whatever we have. Try to asses the risks and choose as carefully as possible, knowing it may not work out how we hope or expect. Or maybe always expect consequences. Never go into pursuing better mental health thinking there won't be consequences one way or the other. On the whole, there still seems to be a lack of understanding when it comes to how individuals deal with things. Even as we push towards openness with these matters, there is still this prevailing attitude that there should be a one-size-fits-all answer.

I think it's important to have an open mind and be able to take the bad with the good. That's where I stand on things like this. But that is to say it's never all good, either. We all want to get to a point where everybody is able to be on an even footing with this stuff and we have solid, effective ways for approaching mental health, but realistically I don't see us ever getting to that point. It's always gonna be kind of touch and go. And then there will be consequences that will also have to be dealt with by society as a whole. In absence of real answers all we can do is follow the leads we have, see what works, and what doesn't. Preemptively ruling things out, or thinking we knew what was going on is what set us back to where we're now at in the first place. If it seems like something can help, we have to try. And then we watch carefully. If it doesn't work, it doesn't work. In order to really learn from that we all have to be able to take a step back... be patient and honest with ourselves, and each other. Or we can go back and forth till the end of time, with nobody ever agreeing, and there always being those people being left out in the cold because of it.


I'm sorry, this became a total ramble, but it is something I've put a lot of thought into and something very personally near and dear to me. Now, more than in the past, I feel it's important to try and get a grip on. And I'm trying. I think most people legitimately are, too. I think we can reach a point where we all understand things better, but before that our approaches will change in ways that presently can't be foreseen by anyone, least of all myself. We all do want for there to be an answer that is clear and digestible from our respective reference points - we all see and personally know the suffering and damage that mental issues bring, but it is never going to be able to be boiled down in the way people seem to want it to be, no matter what side of the fence you're on. We all have to be able to see different sides to all of it and try to recognize when things need to be left be, as part of a process that only the person going through it can direct appropriately. There will always be those dark times and regrettable choices. You shouldn't seek to avoid those, or ever believe that you're ever succeeding in doing that - at best you are simply between missteps. Even in these positivity movements that seem to cause so much harm, there are aspects that are important to bring forward. It could be the right choice, or it could be a misstep. Either way, it has to happen for people to get to the next step. We will move on from that when society is ready. Right now we aren't, but fortunately it isn't static and doesn't ever move in one direction.

First world problems are funny and this will only make the process of grief longer.

1 week before my father died the last words from me: you are an asshole i hate ya - i hate myself to this day for this since 30 years but i was young and dumb and now i only think of the good moments without VR or something creepy.

next is they implement ya a good memory in your brain.
Don't take this the wrong way. I don't truly know the meaning behind them, but the words you say contradict each other. I legitimately do not know how to parse what you said. It reads as "I hate myself for something decades in the past, but I'm fine. I don't know what those people's problems are." At least one of those things doesn't jive. To say you still hate yourself and have that be the first thing you think to say implies that you haven't moved on yourself. No shade. No judgement. Just how it comes off, without reading into it.
 
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life goes on and i will never forgive me for saying such words to my family but i will not go into VR and excuse what i did because my father is dead.
 
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life goes on and i will never forgive me for saying such words to my family but i will not go into VR and excuse what i did because my father is dead.
Thank you for clarifying. That I can understand perfectly well.
 
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Yup people are willing to form that it helped her while asking others to prove it didn't.
I never said it helped her. I said before you condemn it, have some fricking substantiating evidence.
 

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I never said it helped her. I said before you condemn it, have some fricking substantiating evidence.
How many times can you go back?
How many more sessions will it take?
Can this become a weekly event, where it's just easier to keep the vision alive and not deal with the loss?
Will this make it easier to get over the death of a loved one or just easier for you to make a new fake reality rather than deal with the reality it's self?
Lot's of questions None answerable at this time.
 
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Apparently because people always wait for Neon signs and you always hear they never saw things coming or getting worse.
That is called denial.
 
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All good reasons to withhold judgement.
Okay I'll give this to you.
But I'm still leaning on the fence on this.
 
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Okay I'll give this to you.
But I'm still leaning on the fence on this.
Oh I totally get that.

I'm preaching caution for sure, not enthusiasm.
 
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How many times can you go back?
How many more sessions will it take?
Can this become a weekly event, where it's just easier to keep the vision alive and not deal with the loss?
Will this make it easier to get over the death of a loved one or just easier for you to make a new fake reality rather than deal with the reality it's self?
Lot's of questions None answerable at this time.
Things that a clinical study would look into. Not some production done for views. The VR studio isn't going to follow up on her nor is the Documentary production.
 

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Things that a clinical study would look into. Not some production done for views. The VR studio isn't going to follow up on her nor is the Documentary production.
Exactly.
Probably the reason for all the negative comments really.
This is on it's face at the very least creepy and that would be due to it's new nature and the new way it's being used, claiming (or on it's face claiming) this is a great way to say good bye or whatever to bring back the dead.
 
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Exactly.
Probably the reason for all the negative comments really.
This is on it's face at the very least creepy and that would be due to it's new nature and the new way it's being used, claiming (or on it's face claiming) this is a great way to say good bye or whatever to bring back the dead.
To me its interesting because it the seems in here some are all about VR/tech centric. The well being of her and her family is like secondary almost dismissive like Metal Health is in society. She still has a husband and kids which are also effected. People don't even bring up, like they don't exist in this equation.

Being a tech forum i can see its leaning more tech but there is a huge leap from a one off production to clinical studies/trials.

On a lighter note:
One step closer to putting the afterlife out of business. Did you see a ghost? Nah, I went down to the VR Studio and saw great grandpa. He asked if Half-Life 3 was out yet.
 
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trickson

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To me its interesting because its all about VR/tech centric. The well being of her and her family is like secondary almost dismissive like Metal Health is in society. She still has a husband and kids which are also effected.

Being a tech forum i can see its leaning more tech but there is a huge leap from a one off production to clinical studies/trials.
I really think this should have been done under some kind of mental health professional not some VR tech.
See things like this are ban from being tested like this in America (THANK GOD) Because this could be unhealthy dangerous and misused.
 
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Things that a clinical study would look into. Not some production done for views. The VR studio isn't going to follow up on her nor is the Documentary production.
No, but it got the right questions asked. You can't exactly outlaw things that haven't been tried yet... you wouldn't even know where to start. That's why we don't even try, nor should we. We wait for the abuse rather than trying to preempt it, unless you have science proving something that is.

A side example would be drones. There is no way anyone could've thought we'd need the drone regulations we need today when they started making model aircraft toys and such. And if they had applied those regulations immediately, it probably would've scared an entire industry into death.

The system works somewhat clunkily, but it does work and it's best to not pretend we all know what's best for everyone. Leave the judgements to the real professionals.
 

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No, but it got the right questions asked. You can't exactly outlaw things that haven't been tried yet... you wouldn't even know where to start. That's why we don't even try, nor should we. We wait for the abuse rather than trying to preempt it, unless you have science proving something that is.

A side example would be drones. There is no way anyone could've thought we'd need the drone regulations we need today when they started making model aircraft toys and such. And if they had applied those regulations immediately, it probably would've scared an entire industry into death.

The system works somewhat clunkily, but it does work and it's best to not pretend we all know what's best for everyone. Leave the judgements to the real professionals.
Yeah that's I think why also so much negativiaty is given.
See with this kind of a trial I think they should have had a clinical doctor at the least present and caring for the women before and after.
But maybe soon things like this will get the trials needed? Here in America it would need to be done fore sure, This kind of questonable tech is moreregulated since it would be leaning more twards the mental health community ths then would fall under lots of clinical and medical guidelines.
 
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It's true - VR tech, especially stuff like this where it can render people you know and recognize, I feel like is getting to the point where it can start giving you actual PTSD and we are nowhere near ready for it.
 
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I feel like is getting to the point where it can start giving you actual PTSD and we are nowhere near ready for it.
That's an opinion not supported by merit or evidence.
 
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It's true - VR tech, especially stuff like this where it can render people you know and recognize, I feel like is getting to the point where it can start giving you actual PTSD and we are nowhere near ready for it.
Not VR but there was a study published last year

Abstract
Threatening cues and surrounding contexts trigger specific defensive response patterns. Posturography, a technique for measuring postural strategies, has been used to evaluate motor defensive reactions in humans. When exposed to gun pointed pictures, humans were shown to exhibit an immobility reaction. Short and long-term exposure to violent video games was shown to be a causal risk factor for increased violent and aggressive behavior. Assaultive violence with a gun is a major trigger for motor defensive reactions, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is the most characteristic psychiatric sequelae. Recent studies point to links between PTSD symptoms and emotional shortfalls in non-clinical trauma-exposed samples. The present study investigated defensive reactions to gun threat and PTSD symptoms in heavy players of violent video games compared to non-players. Male university students were screened according to use of violent video games and divided in three groups: non-players, moderate players, and heavy players. Stimuli were pictures depicting a man pointing a gun directed at the participant. In matched control pictures, non-lethal objects replaced the gun. Posturography was recorded and PTSD symptoms were assessed. When exposed to the threat pictures, non-players exhibited the expected reduction in amplitude of body sway (immobility), heavy players presented atypical augmented amplitude of body sway, and moderate players showed intermediate reactivity. Heavy players presented a significant distinct reaction compared to non-players. They also scored significantly higher in PTSD symptoms than non-players. Disadvantageous defensive reactions and higher vulnerability to PTSD symptoms, revealed in the present study, add to other shortcomings for heavy players.

PTSD Symptoms
Given the postural differences between heavy players and non-players, scores on the PTSD symptoms scale (PCL-C for DSM-IV) were compared between the two groups. Participants who anchored their PCL-C responses on a life-threatening trauma were included in the present analysis (14 non-players and 8 heavy players).
Total scores on the PCL-C were significantly higher for heavy players compared to non-players (Z = -2.06, p = 0.04). Scores on the PCL-C hyperarousal cluster were also significantly higher for heavy players (Z = -2.08, p = 0.04). Scores on the numbing/avoidance cluster, although higher for heavy players, did not reach statistical significance (Z = -1.77, p = 0.08). Scores on the reexperiencing cluster did not differ (Z = 0.78, p = 0.41).
The difference in PTSD symptoms between heavy players and non-players remained statistically significant (PCL-C total score (Z = 2.58, p = 0.01)) when participants who did not anchor their PCL-C responses on a life-threatening trauma were included in the analysis.


Conclusion
Accumulating evidence led to a clear consensus that a high frequency of exposure to violent video games significantly alters important interpersonal behaviors in negative ways (Bender et al., 2018). Atypical disadvantageous defensive reactions and higher vulnerability to PTSD symptoms, revealed in the present study, add to other shortcomings for the heavy players themselves.
 
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That's a pretty small sample. I'd also be curious what exactly qualifies as "high-frequency of exposure"

I dunno, it's interesting but not much to go by.
 
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That's an opinion not supported by merit or evidence.
Right, because VRET is currently used to treat PTSD; therefore it's completely meritless to assume that certain experiences in VR can impact the condition negatively. Even though it's widely known that exposure to digital content can absolutely cause mental trauma.

Youtube moderators have to sign a waiver acknowledging that their jobs can cause PTSD and mental trauma, and Microsoft got sued for the same thing by its own mods...

When you strap on a ultra-realistic digital media device to your face and have an incredibly disturbing experience; it's completely meritless to think that this could cause issues.
 
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That's a pretty small sample. I'd also be curious what exactly qualifies as "high-frequency of exposure"

I dunno, it's interesting but not much to go by.
88 participants in total. 48 Male / 40 Female. Not small sample when you compare it to some of the studies that include treating Vets with PTSD those samples don't get into the double digits.

The 17 Participants that fit
“Heavy players” were those that reported using violent video games “often” or “almost always”.
 
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Right, because VRET is currently used to treat PTSD; therefore it's completely meritless to assume that certain experiences in VR can impact the condition negatively. Even though it's widely known that exposure to digital content can absolutely cause mental trauma.

Youtube moderators have to sign a waiver acknowledging that their jobs can cause PTSD and mental trauma, and Microsoft got sued for the same thing by its own mods...

When you strap on a ultra-realistic digital media device to your face and have an incredibly disturbing experience; it's completely meritless to think that this could cause issues.
You're blowing things out of proportion, like many in this thread.
 
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next is they implement ya a good memory in your brain.
Total Recall.

Someone get Douglas Quaid on the phone and find out if he's living the real thing or just stuck in a memory.
 
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You're blowing things out of proportion, like many in this thread.
I mean it's a thread about a mother's reaction to her actually dead VR daughter. It's a pretty dramatic thread to begin with.

Just imagine people's online reaction if you put a clip of a dog/other animal reacting to a video of its deceased pup in VR like that...
 
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