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Laptop Power Adapter overheating

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by dude12564, Mar 27, 2012.

  1. dude12564 New Member

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    Hey guys, my friend owns a Toshiba laptop (i don't know what model), however, the power adapter is overheating. This adapter is a replacement from the original, as the old one broke, and it is a Toshiba adapter.

    Specs are as follows :
    I3-350M (iGPU)
    4GB RAM
    Win7 Home premium
    500gb HDD at 5400RPM


    Do you guys know what the problem is?
     
  2. dude12564 New Member

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    *bump*
     
  3. Darkgundam111 New Member

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    laptop adapters (the stock ones that come with the laptops) seem to have poor quality and die often. One friend went through like 3 of them (since they were under warranty), the other friend has a funky one that seems to stop charging after some time, so he got a new charger off amazon. perhaps invest in a better charger? other than that, just keep it in a open area so that hot air doesn't trap or you can try to put a mini-fan to blow on it if you are using that charger at home or something.
     
  4. dude12564 New Member

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    I think there is already a fan blowing on it, i'll check with him though.
    The adapter is OEM, but the 3-prong is from Canada Computers.
     
  5. Mauler87 New Member

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    Hello,

    I believe the problem with the powerpacks overheating is probably related to toshiba using low-quality capacitors in the powerpacks you have been using. Alternatively you can try unplugging the powerpack and prying it open (they edo require some force but dont worry you wont "break" it) if you have a soldering iron you can buy your own caps and solder them in and voila...no more overheating powerpacks.
     

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