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Latest Windows 10 Insider Preview Introduces per Process "Power Throttling"

Discussion in 'News' started by R-T-B, Apr 21, 2017.

  1. R-T-B

    R-T-B

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    With its latest Insider Preview build of Windows 10 (Build 16176), Microsoft has introduced a feature known as "Power Throttling," which is essentially per-process power management leveraging the Intel Speed Shift technology available in 6th-gen and newer Intel processors. According to Microsoft, although Power Throttling currently requires Intel's "Speed Shift" tech, it will be expanded to earlier generation Intel processors that lack the feature in coming months.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    As of now, the tech is essentially automatic (though you can control its overall aggressiveness with a slider) and works by placing background low-workload processes into the CPUs lower power states so that as Microsoft puts it "work gets done, but the minimal possible battery is spent on that work." Microsoft claims up to an 11% savings on CPU power consumption using this technology alone.

    If this sounds interesting to you, it's as easy as opting into the Windows Insider Program, or downloading the latest Preview Build from the fast ring to try out this new feature.

    Source: Microsoft
     
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  2. fullinfusion

    fullinfusion 1.21 Gigawatts

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    Ummmm..... :confused:
     
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  3. P4-630

    P4-630 The Way It's Meant to be Played

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  4. evernessince

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    In other words, the CPU does these tasks when they are in their lower frequency, lower voltage power saving mode. It's smart because CPUs can usually really turn down the voltage at lower frequencies.
     
  5. Octopuss

    Octopuss

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    Ah!
    So they forcefully disable Windows update on Windows 7 running new CPUs, claiming it's impossible to support blabla, and then add support for old CPUs in new Windows. Suure.
     
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  6. R-T-B

    R-T-B

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  7. Derek12

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    Interesting, I will try it on my laptop with Skylake

    New Windows can support old CPUs that meet its requirements.
    Old Windows don't support new CPUs

    Anyway blocking updates is a bad move for me :mad:
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2017
  8. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    i think the goal here is that if only throttled tasks are running, high CPU usage wont ramp up the CPU - so say, if you're idling at the desktop on a battery powered laptop, the CPU wont ramp up above idle clocks (say 1GHz) while doing background tasks to prioritise battery - or the core doing your netflix will max out, while the others stay at idle and do the background tasks.
     
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  9. RejZoR

    RejZoR

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    I don't quite understand why you need hardware support for this. To sell more Intel CPU's? It's something OS process/thread scheduler could sort out.
     
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  10. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    on the older CPU's, you gotta disable a core to boost one. Educated guess that the new hardware lets each core be locked by software (not just CPU/board logic) to certain power states, so it can have finer control over things.
     
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  11. cdawall

    cdawall where the hell are my stars

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    Well this is a kinda cool feature I may have to try it out.
     
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  12. Derek12

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    Maybe something to do with latencies while switching modes
     
  13. TheLaughingMan

    TheLaughingMan

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    Or maybe something to do with those fat stacks Intel is giving them.
     
  14. Derek12

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    source?
     
  15. semantics

    semantics

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    Be interesting for older laptops
     
  16. TheLaughingMan

    TheLaughingMan

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    This one. A software company does not naturally design new software to exclusively work with only a small segment of the hardware market. Common software development practice is to develop for as large an audience as possible. They only way this gets limited to on new chips with certain specification is a limited in implementation or a corporate agreement (IE an exchange or goods, service, etc.).

    I could also cite several history examples of Intel (and others) using planned obsolescence to push their new produces when there is little to no difference in the new version such as the artificial limitation of UltraHD with Netflix. Of several lawsuits Intel has against them for anti-competitive practices filed by the US and EU.

    I can't substantiate any of this as the lawsuits are about other issues from years ago and I don't work for any involved party. And even if I did, that is the kind of information that contracts get signed about not releasing to the public....so I am not sure what you want from me beyond Intel having a long storied history doing whatever it takes to get people to buy their stuff even if its not fair, bad for consumers, or straight up illegal.
     

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