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My ASUS TUF FX504 GE laptop is literally melting under gaming charge, reaching 92°C at some point

NightySama

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Hello everyone.

I'm posting this thread because after spending my entire day trying to find how to solve my issue myself, I eventually gave up, and chose to ask the community for some help.
Here is the problem:

My ASUS TUF FX504 GE laptop is litteraly melting under gaming charge, reaching 92°C at some point.
So I decided to install ThrottleStop to undervolt it a bit. It works perfectly for that, and using 3D MARK + integrated Bench, I think I found the settings I needed, lowering my CPU temperature by 15° when in heavy charge.

Anyway, there is still a problem occuring. As this is particularly hard to explain, I will try to do it step by step:
1- Starting ThrottleStop (with either stock or custom voltage settings), then running the integrated bench once, twice, ten times. No issue, my CPU is going full speed, with temperature depending on the setting.
2- Starting 3D Mark. It works smoothly, no throttle, no lag, nothing wrong. Having decent result.
3- Checking the highest temperature recorded during the test in ThottleStop. From this point, my MAX TDP isn't the same it used to be before the 3D MARK test. Even with ThrottleStop turned to OFF, the max TDP stays as it is, and launching the integrated benchmark shows the really sad truth: the program is downsizing my CPU max TDP in a drastic way.

Here are some numbers to help you figure what I'm talking about:
Intel I5 8300H, 4 cores, 8 threads, 2.3Ghz, going 3.9Ghz in burst mode, 4.0Ghz when 1 core or more desactivated.

STOCK core/cache voltage => going 3.9Ghz during integrated bench, reaching 88°C in a single pass, then 92 with 5 bench in a row. MAX TDP reached 48W.
I then launch 3D MARK, wether I have done one bench or ten. Next, checking ThrottleStop to monitor the max reached temperature, and the MAX TDP is said to be 25W.
Once there, every benchmark or game launched is crippled by this 25W TDP limit, with the max CPU clock 2.7Ghz.

Custom settings for core/cache voltage (-158.2 Mv) => going 3.9Ghz during integrated bench, reaching 74°C in a single pass, then 77 with 5 bench in a row. MAX TDP reached 35W.
I then launch 3D MARK, wether I have done one bench or ten. Next, checking ThrottleStop to monitor the max reached temperature, and the MAX TDP is said to be 25W.
Once there, every benchmark or game launched is crippled by this 25W TDP limit, with the max CPU clock 2.7Ghz.

In any case, shutting down ThrottleStop lets my CPU perform again at full Clock, but full oven heatness. I tried many things, such as checking the disable TURBO LIMIT POWER option (because once the 25W power limitation is ON, I keep having PL2 issues), even setting the TURBO BOOST SHORT POWER MAX from 80 to 100, enable or disable Speed Shift, etc. Nothing worked.
Looking for any tip.
Thanks everyone !
 

unclewebb

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@NightySama - Some laptops have a feature that when the Nvidia GPU becomes active, the CPU power limit is dropped significantly. The built in TS Bench does not use the Nvidia GPU so it should run fine. Other benchmarks or games that use the Nvidia GPU will throttle the CPU.

When your computer is idle, in the FIVR window check the Disable and Lock Turbo Power Limits option.

Open the TPL window and set the turbo power limits to their default values which is somewhere around 45W for the long term power limit and 60W for the short term limit. In the Turbo Boost Power Limits section, check the Lock option and then press OK. This sometimes helps keep the power limit at an appropriate value. Some laptops will enforce a 25W limit regardless of your ThrottleStop settings. Remember this hidden feature that Asus saddled your laptop with next time you are laptop shopping. It is BS that companies get away with stuff like this.

literally melting under gaming charge, reaching 92°C at some point.
Nothing is going to melt at that temperature. Your hands might get hot. Go buy an external keyboard to solve that problem.

Intel says their CPUs can run reliably at up to 100°C. That is the Intel specified thermal throttling temperature. On the main ThrottleStop window you will be able to see what temperature that Asus set the PROCHOT (processor hot) thermal throttling temperature to. They always low ball this so Intel CPUs in Asus laptops tend to start thermal throttling far sooner than they should. Nothing to worry about. Run your CPU hot. It was designed to handle running at high temperatures for extended periods of time.
 

NightySama

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Some laptops have a feature that when the Nvidia GPU becomes active, the CPU power limit is dropped significantly. The built in TS Bench does not use the Nvidia GPU so it should run fine. Other benchmarks or games that use the Nvidia GPU will throttle the CPU.
It does make sense, but, playing games like Subnautica, Divinity etc, with Nvidia GPU doesn't seem to put down the CPU power limit. It seems only 3D MARK causes ThrottleStop to act this weird.

When your computer is idle, in the FIVR window check the Disable and Lock Turbo Power Limits option.
Like I said in my first post, this option is already checked.
Open the TPL window and set the turbo power limits to their default values which is somewhere around 45W for the long term power limit and 60W for the short term limit.
OK. The default values are 45W for PL1, and 80 for PL2. I previously raised PL2 from 80 to 100, trying to avoid the 25W max.

In the Turbo Boost Power Limits section, check the Lock option and then press OK
OK. I didn't use this option, because not knowing exactly what it locks. Now, it is activated.

Nothing is going to melt at that temperature. Your hands might get hot. Go buy an external keyboard to solve that problem.
I know 90°C isn't "dangerous" for CPU, but I wonder for motherboard, RAM, or even battery... Also, it seems quite hot for the plastic case too.

PROCHOT is set to 88. But the CPU often goes over 90°C.

Anyway, I'd like to thank you for this quick answer. I will give feedbacks asap for the new settings.
 

Toothless

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You can run it at 100c all day, every day and it'll be fine.
 
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unclewebb

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playing games like Subnautica, Divinity etc, with Nvidia GPU doesn't seem to put down the CPU power limit.
I do not know what the exact trigger is. It could be either the temperature of the Nvidia GPU or the power consumption of the Nvidia GPU. As soon as you crash this threshold, this can force the CPU to a 25W power limit. Properly designed laptops do not do this but I know that Dell, Asus and Lenovo all use a variety of schemes like this where the CPU is limited to less than its rated speed or below the rated TDP power limit. When you cannot solve a problem like this with ThrottleStop, it would be best to return the laptop immediately. Companies get away with creating laptops with severe throttling issues because consumers rarely complain.

The default values are 45W for PL1, and 80 for PL2.
A 4 core CPU is never going to consume 80W but it is OK to set the turbo power limits sky high. Some desktop boards set the power limits to 4095W (max possible) just to make sure these limits never interfere with maximum performance.

I know 90°C isn't "dangerous" for CPU, but I wonder for motherboard, RAM, or even battery..
Any company building a modern laptop with an Intel CPU knows that these CPUs can run at 90°C or more. It is up to manufacturers to include components that can run reliably at high temperatures without failing. Every manufacturer is building laptops that constantly run at high temperatures. The forums would be full of complaints if there was a high failure rate of motherboards, RAM or batteries. I am not seeing these kind of complaints in the forums.

PROCHOT is set to 88°C.
Intel recommends that the thermal throttling temperature should be set to 100°C. Intel knows that when you reduce the maximum operating temperature, you reduce maximum performance. That is not what Intel wants. The decision by Asus to set the throttling temperature to 88°C is cowardly. Your laptop will underperform but it will be extra safe. If I bought a laptop with this limit, I would have sent it back to Asus day 1.
 
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