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My PSU is dead?

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I have Corsair RM850X 80 Plus Gold PSU.

HWmonitor values are normal?

What should I do now?
-I can chance "modular cables" in psu.
-I can buy a new psu.

129549
 
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In general, software readings of voltages like those are often completely wrong.
If the +12V rail was really working at 1.7V, you wouldn't make that screenshot.

Ignore this nonsense and don't waste any more time on that. If there was a problem with PSU, you'd know (for example, random shutdowns during load).
 

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Software is obviously boned as mentioned above.
What values do you see in the BIOS? That G1 should have most of a page for monitoring these things.
 
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@Flaky What kinda of shutdown during load? and thanks for your answer.

@sneekypeet I'm going to check my bios i'll tell you. Thank you.
 

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@Flaky What kinda of shutdown during load? and thanks for your answer.
If your PSU was only delivering 2V to the motherboard, the system would not run ;) BSODs, crashes from games/playing videos to the desktop, things like this would be regularly happening if the PSU were on its way out.
 

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If your PSU was only delivering 2V to the motherboard, the system would not run ;) BSODs, crashes from games/playing videos to the desktop, things like this would be regularly happening if the PSU were on its way out.
Yeah this.

BIOS readings can be wrong too though. PSU's is one of those things you can't know if they're bad until they go wrong, unless you have the knowhow and tools to measure the voltages. But that's why we have warranties, and that model has a decade long one iirc. Nothing is wrong with it though if the system runs ok, which has been pointed out.
 

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BIOS readings can be wrong too though.
Agreed to a point, but most times in my experience, the BIOS is much closer to reality.
Lets be honest though, a $5-$10 multi-meter and a few images from google to find the 12V+ and Ground leads in a 24-pin, you will know for certain.
 
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If it's running well enough to see HW monitor, I doubt it's totally dead.

Use a voltmeter; the 3.3V being low could cause the SMBus chip to read wrong; so you could have one rail that going out.

Check the voltages at the 24 pin connector.
 
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@greatfarid what exactly makes you think your PSU is dead? What are the symptoms?
 
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FTR, it often is not the software that is wrong when you get readings that far off. CPUID HWMonitor is a very popular and widely used monitoring program. If the software, there likely would be 1000s of reports of such voltage readings being so far off.

I would suspect the sensor or its circuit first. Those sensors are very low-tech devices. You can verify with another program like HwInfo64.

The ATX Form Factor standard requires voltage tolerances not to exceed ±5%. So for the +12VDC, acceptable output voltages are 11.4V to 12.6V. I agree with everyone else and your computer, including the fans and drive motors, would not be running if your +12V was really that low.

That said, no software based monitoring program to test PSUs is 100% conclusive. And neither is a multimeter. To properly and conclusively test a PSU, it must be tested under a variety of realistic "loads" then analyzed for excessive ripple and other anomalies that affect computer stability. This is done by a qualified technician using an oscilloscope or power supply analyzer - sophisticated (and expensive!) electronic test equipment requiring special training to operate, and a basic knowledge of electronics theory to understand the results. Therefore, conclusively testing a power supply is done in properly equipped electronics repair facilities.

You can test for missing voltages with a multimeter, but it is difficult, at best, to test a PSU under a variety of loads with a multimeter. And most multimeters cannot test for ripple or poor regulation. For those reasons, swapping in a known good spare PSU is really the better test and is commonly done by amateurs and pros alike.

Fortunately, there are other options that are almost as good if you don’t have a known good spare supply handy. I keep a PSU Tester in my tool bag in my truck for house calls. The advantage of this model is that it has a LCD readout of the voltages. With an actual voltage readout, you have a better chance of detecting a "failing" PSU, or one barely within the required ±5% tolerances (at least with the tester’s internal load). Unlike a multimeter, these testers provide a small "dummy load". It is a single load but that's better than no load. Plus, there's no guess work with these testers as to which pin should carry which voltage. Again, not conclusive, but pretty handy just the same.
 
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Its oft worthwhile to try different utilities ... each one must be coded for the particualar sensors / MoBo. I find HWiNFO gives me the lease issues and makes having others redundant
 
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I find HWiNFO gives me the lease issues
I agree. The problem with HWiNFO is the sheer volume of information it provides can be overwhelming - especially for new users. So selecting "Sensors Only" at start is often recommended.

As a side comment, I note Speccy, another popular system information program, would frequently report very inaccurate voltages. For example, on this computer, it would report my +12V was at +.5V which of course was impossible. Apparently the problem was so difficult to resolve that recent versions of Speccy no longer report on the +12V, +5, or +3.3V values.
 
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FTR, it often is not the software that is wrong when you get readings that far off. CPUID HWMonitor is a very popular and widely used monitoring program. If the software, there likely would be 1000s of reports of such voltage readings being so far off.

I would suspect the sensor or its circuit first. Those sensors are very low-tech devices. You can verify with another program like HwInfo64.

The ATX Form Factor standard requires voltage tolerances not to exceed ±5%. So for the +12VDC, acceptable output voltages are 11.4V to 12.6V. I agree with everyone else and your computer, including the fans and drive motors, would not be running if your +12V was really that low.

That said, no software based monitoring program to test PSUs is 100% conclusive. And neither is a multimeter. To properly and conclusively test a PSU, it must be tested under a variety of realistic "loads" then analyzed for excessive ripple and other anomalies that affect computer stability. This is done by a qualified technician using an oscilloscope or power supply analyzer - sophisticated (and expensive!) electronic test equipment requiring special training to operate, and a basic knowledge of electronics theory to understand the results. Therefore, conclusively testing a power supply is done in properly equipped electronics repair facilities.

You can test for missing voltages with a multimeter, but it is difficult, at best, to test a PSU under a variety of loads with a multimeter. And most multimeters cannot test for ripple or poor regulation. For those reasons, swapping in a known good spare PSU is really the better test and is commonly done by amateurs and pros alike.

Fortunately, there are other options that are almost as good if you don’t have a known good spare supply handy. I keep a PSU Tester in my tool bag in my truck for house calls. The advantage of this model is that it has a LCD readout of the voltages. With an actual voltage readout, you have a better chance of detecting a "failing" PSU, or one barely within the required ±5% tolerances (at least with the tester’s internal load). Unlike a multimeter, these testers provide a small "dummy load". It is a single load but that's better than no load. Plus, there's no guess work with these testers as to which pin should carry which voltage. Again, not conclusive, but pretty handy just the same.
Thank you sir. That problem is solved but i read your answer.

@greatfarid what exactly makes you think your PSU is dead? What are the symptoms?
Sometimes my computer shuts down on. I think it's because of overclocking but i'm not totally sure. I'm using intel xeon w3680 at 4.40 ghz on gigabyte g1 killer assasin x58 1366 motherboard.

Its oft worthwhile to try different utilities ... each one must be coded for the particualar sensors / MoBo. I find HWiNFO gives me the lease issues and makes having others redundant
It seems so.

If it's running well enough to see HW monitor, I doubt it's totally dead.

Use a voltmeter; the 3.3V being low could cause the SMBus chip to read wrong; so you could have one rail that going out.

Check the voltages at the 24 pin connector.
This isn't something I can do right now. Thanks for the suggestion.

If your PSU was only delivering 2V to the motherboard, the system would not run ;) BSODs, crashes from games/playing videos to the desktop, things like this would be regularly happening if the PSU were on its way out.
I'm confused. I hope my PSU is still good. I've had these problems sometimes. I mean I had these crashes when I was play games... but i'm not totally sure may be because of overclocking.
 
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Get rid of the overclock and see if the problem persists...
 
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