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NASA's Juno Launches to Jupiter

Discussion in 'Science & Technology' started by Drone, Aug 8, 2011.

  1. Drone

    Drone

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    [​IMG]

    Wow 5 years!

    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/juno/main/index.html

    Engineers have received communications from the Juno spacecraft, and its solar arrays have deployed.
     
  2. Drone

    Drone

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    Lolwut?! I created this thread 5 years ago :eek: No, it can't be! And it's almost time!!!

    NASA's Juno Spacecraft Crosses Jupiter/Sun Gravitational Boundary


    Since its launch 5 years ago, there have been three forces tugging at NASA's Juno spacecraft as it speeds through the solar system. The sun, Earth and Jupiter have all been influential - a gravitational trifecta of sorts. At times, Earth was close enough to be the frontrunner. More recently, the sun has had the most clout when it comes to Juno's trajectory. Today, it can be reported that Jupiter is now in the gravitational driver’s seat, and the basketball court-sized spacecraft is not looking back.

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    "Today the gravitational influence of Jupiter is neck and neck with that of the Sun," said Rick Nybakken, Juno project manager at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "As of tomorrow, and for the rest of the mission, we project Jupiter's gravity will dominate as the trajectory-perturbing effects by other celestial bodies are reduced to insignificant roles."

    Juno was launched on Aug. 5, 2011. On July 4 of this year, it will perform a Jupiter orbit insertion maneuver - a 35-minute burn of its main engine, which will impart a mean change in velocity of 542 m/s on the spacecraft. Once in orbit, the spacecraft will circle the Jovian world 37 times, skimming to within 5000 km above the planet's cloud tops. During the flybys, Juno will probe beneath the obscuring cloud cover of Jupiter and study its aurorae to learn more about the planet's origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere.

    Juno's name comes from Greek and Roman mythology. The mythical god Jupiter drew a veil of clouds around himself to hide his mischief, and his wife - the goddess Juno - was able to peer through the clouds and reveal Jupiter's true nature.

     
  3. R-T-B

    R-T-B

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    I can't decide which is more of a throwback... the fact that the probe launched 5 years ago (holy shit it seems like yesterday I read about it) or that Bill Nye youtube.

    I used to love Bill Nye. He's a legit science man, bro:

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Drone

    Drone

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  5. Drone

    Drone

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    Juno Mission overview: Unlocking Jupiter's Mysteries

    It's an old video (2011) but I haven't seen it:



    And here's a new episode with Nye

     
  6. Niteblooded

    Niteblooded

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    This is the mission that excites me. Been fascinated with Jupiter since I was a child. Not because its the biggest (though that helps) but just so much mystery behind those clouds. And what exactly is a gaseous giant?! No scientist can answer that question even if have some well founded theories on the general makeup. So cool to think we might find out soon.

    Bill Nye stars in various videos online and makes a few appearances on Star Talk.
     
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  7. Drone

    Drone

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    Lots of cool stuff:

    Part 1:









     
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  8. Drone

    Drone

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    part 2:







     
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  9. Drone

    Drone

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    Part 3!



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  10. Drone

    Drone

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    1 day 18 hours left

    [​IMG]



     
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  11. Jetster

    Jetster

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    I use to love him too. The irony is he only has a BS in Mechanical Engineering. He's not a scientist. He an entertainer
     
  12. R-T-B

    R-T-B

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    I'm aware (it's why I called him a "science man" rather than a scientist). He was good at selling science on tv to kids though, and let's be honest, he knows plenty enough for that.
     
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  13. Jetster

    Jetster

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    Yea I love listening to him. He gets excited about it
     
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  14. Drone

    Drone

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    Just 5 hours left:

    Latest news



     
  15. Drone

    Drone

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    Juno Infographics by NASA JPL. They probably answer lots of questions you might ask:

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  16. Niteblooded

    Niteblooded

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    No cool stuff but update for my fellow nerds...

    On July 6 they powered up 5 of the 9 payloads (unless there is more that's not public). The rest will be powered up by the end of the month.

    "We are in our planned 53.4 day orbit. Now we are focusing on preparing for our fourth and final main engine burn, which will put us in our 14-day science orbit on October 19.”

    The next time Juno’s orbit carries it close by the planet will be on Aug. 27. The flyby is expected to provide some preliminary science data.

    “We had to turn all our beautiful instruments off to help ensure a successful Jupiter orbit insertion on July 4,” said Scott Bolton, Juno principal investigator from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. “But next time around we will have our eyes and ears open. You can expect us to release some information about our findings around September 1.”​

    So ya... we have to wait for the good stuff. :(

    Pretty standard though as they have to do a system checkout, lock in their orbit and power on the instruments in a safe fashion especially since Jupiter's orbit is more dangerous than any other satellite has flown. Here is a look at their 9 instruments:

    Microwave radiometer (MWR) - The microwave radiometer comprises six antennas mounted on two of the sides of the body of the probe. They will perform measurements of electromagnetic waves on frequencies in the microwave range: 600 MHz, 1.2, 2.4, 4.8, 9.6 and 22 GHz, the only microwave frequencies which are able to pass through the thick Jovian atmosphere. The radiometer will measure the abundance of water and ammonia in the deep layers of the atmosphere up to 200 bar pressure or 500 to 600 km deep. The combination of different wavelengths and the emission angle should make it possible to obtain a temperature profile at various levels of the atmosphere. The data collected will determine how deep the atmospheric circulation is.

    Jovian Infrared Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) - The spectrometer mapper JIRAM, operating in the near infrared (between 2 and 5 μm), conducts surveys in the upper layers of the atmosphere to a depth of between 50 and 70 km where the pressure reaches 5 to 7 bars. JIRAM will provide images of the aurora in the wavelength of 3.4 μm in regions with abundant H3+ ions. By measuring the heat radiated by the atmosphere of Jupiter, JIRAM can determine how clouds with water are flowing beneath the surface. It can also detect methane, water vapor, ammonia and phosphine. It was not required that this device meets the radiation resistance requirements.

    Magnetometer (MAG) - Many satellites use a magnetometer for attitude determination and correction but here is what it does for Juno... The magnetic field investigation has three goals: mapping of the magnetic field, determining the dynamics of Jupiter's interior, and determination of the three-dimensional structure of the polar magnetosphere. The magnetometer experiment consists of the Flux Gate Magnetometer (FGM), which will measure the strength and direction of the magnetic field lines, and the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC), which will monitor the orientation of the magnetometer sensors.

    Gravity Science (GS) - The purpose of measuring gravity by radio waves is to establish a map of the distribution of mass inside Jupiter. The uneven distribution of mass in Jupiter induces small variations in gravity all along the orbit followed by the probe when it runs closer to the surface of the planet. These gravity variations drive small probe velocity changes. The purpose of radio science is to detect the Doppler effect on radio broadcasts issued by Juno toward Earth in Ka band and X band, which are frequency ranges that can conduct the study with fewer disruptions related to the solar wind or the ionosphere.

    Jovian Auroral Distributions Experiment (JADE) - The energetic particle detector JADE will measure the angular distribution, energy, and the velocity vector of ions and electrons at low energy (ions between 13 eV and 20 KeV, electrons of 200 eV to 40 KeV) present in the aurora of Jupiter. On JADE, like JEDI, the electron analyzers are installed on three sides of the upper plate which allows a measure of frequency three times higher.

    Jovian Energetic Particle Detector Instrument (JEDI) - Pretty sure they threw Jovian in front just to get this acronym. :p ...The energetic particle detector JEDI will measure the angular distribution and the velocity vector of ions and electrons at high energy (ions between 20 keV and 1 MeV, electrons from 40 to 500 keV) present in the polar magnetosphere of Jupiter. JEDI has three identical sensors dedicated to the study of particular ions of hydrogen, helium, oxygen and sulfur.

    Radio and Plasma Wave Sensor (Waves) - Looks like to measure the ability for communications for future missions no doubt as well get an idea of the atmosphere's environment... This instrument will identify the regions of auroral currents that define Jovian radio emissions and acceleration of the auroral particles by measuring the radio and plasma spectra in the auroral region.

    Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVS) - UVS will record the wavelength, position and arrival time of detected ultraviolet photons during the time when the spectrograph slit views Jupiter during each turn of the spacecraft. Using a 1024 × 256 micro channel plate detector, it will provide spectral images of the UV auroral emissions in the polar magnetosphere.

    JunoCam (JCM) - A visible light camera/telescope, included in the payload to facilitate education and public outreach. It will operate for only seven orbits around Jupiter because of the planet's damaging radiation and magnetic field. ...sure it's not just for us but who cares what their reason is, this is the fun cool stuff! Who doesn't want close-ups of Jupiter? SpacePr0n Cam is probably not a media friendly name.

    main_junospacecraft0711.jpg
     
  17. Drone

    Drone

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    View from NASA's Eyes on the Solar System and simulated data from the Juno flight team (July 3-4)

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    NASA will purposefully crash Juno to protect alien life

    After its final trip around Jupiter (February 2018), Juno will enter what NASA euphemistically calls its "deorbit phase".

    That's a tactful way of saying Juno will spend the last 5.5 days of its existence hurling itself into Jupiter. The planet's atmosphere is so harsh the spacecraft will burn up.

    Throwing Juno into Jupiter protects Jupiter's moons from contamination since the trip through Jupiter's atmosphere and radiation will destroy any bacteria that may have snuck onto Juno before it launched.
     
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  18. Ahhzz

    Ahhzz

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    Juno crossing Jupiter's "Bow Shock", and entering the Magnetosphere :)
     
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  19. Drone

    Drone

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    The JunoCam camera aboard NASA's Juno mission is operational and sending down data after the spacecraft's July 4 arrival at Jupiter. Juno's visible-light camera was turned on 6 days after Juno fired its main engine and placed itself into orbit around the largest planetary inhabitant of our solar system. The first high-resolution images of Jupiter are still a few weeks away. "This scene from JunoCam indicates it survived its first pass through Jupiter's extreme radiation environment without any degradation and is ready to take on Jupiter," said Scott Bolton, principal investigator from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. "We can't wait to see the first view of Jupiter's poles."

    NASA's Juno Spacecraft Sends First In-orbit View

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    JunoCam was included on the spacecraft specifically for purposes of public engagement, it's not considered one of the mission's science instruments.
     
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  20. R-T-B

    R-T-B

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  21. Drone

    Drone

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    [​IMG]

    This dual view of Jupiter was taken on August 23, when NASA's Juno spacecraft was 2.8 million miles (4.4 million km) from the gas giant planet on the inbound leg of its initial 53.5-day capture orbit.

    This Saturday at 5:51 a.m. PDT, (8:51 a.m. EDT, 12:51 UTC) Juno will get closer to the cloud tops of Jupiter. At the moment of closest approach, Juno will be about 2500 miles (4200 km) above Jupiter's swirling clouds and traveling at 130000 mph (208000 km/h) with respect to the planet. There are 35 more close flybys of Jupiter scheduled during its prime mission (scheduled to end in February of 2018). The Aug. 27 flyby will be the first time Juno will have its entire suite of science instruments activated and looking at the giant planet as the spacecraft zooms past.
     

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