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NZXT E Series 650 W

crmaris

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The NZXT E Series 650 W is a modified and slightly more expensive version of the Seasonic SSR-650FX. It features digital monitoring and limited controls, as well as an interesting look. Read the review to figure out whether it is worth spending about $10 more on over Seasonic's offering.

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good review, I like the new Component Analysis
 
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Good to see Seasonic as OEM. I'm not really fond of those cable capacitors. But this Focus? platform is designed with them on the get-go.
 
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A good PSU ruined by its loudness. Seriously, why does a 650W unit have to be this loud?
 
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Good fuse blowing PSU. That inrush is ridiculous.

87A? How much is it in watts? Like 1kW moment you flip PSU on?
 
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120V*87A=10440W=10.4kW.
However only for a very short time, that shouldn't cause a problem.
 
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120V*87A=10440W=10.4kW.
However only for a very short time, that shouldn't cause a problem.
It was tested on 230V AC system, so your calculations are bit off.

Don't know how @crmaris is testing that, but ain't it dependable to which part of AC sine wave you actually switch power supply on? Or are these PFC circuits somewhat guaranteeing that switch on is always the same no matter when it's done.
 
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120V*87A=10440W=10.4kW.
However only for a very short time, that shouldn't cause a problem.
That would kill even industrial fuse/circuit breaker.

It was tested on 230V AC system, so your calculations are bit off.

Don't know how @crmaris is testing that, but ain't it dependable to which part of AC sine wave you actually switch power supply on? Or are these PFC circuits somewhat guaranteeing that switch on is always the same no matter when it's done.
In case of my PSU which does 66A at switch on, it depends if you 1) switch literally PSU on the back or 2) you have it in power outlet with own switch. Cause in case of 1) my fuses go boom 2) it just works.

Honestly not big fan of high inrush currents. I get that you mostly cant have 30ms hold up without having high inrush (there are some exceptions if Im correct, but very few), but Im perfectly fine if its within regular specs of 17ms and not throwing my circuit breakers.
 

crmaris

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High inrush currents are typical, unfortunately, for the majority of PSUs out there. They are very short though and this is why in most cases they don't trip the circuit breakers. There are cases though where I see the online 3kVA UPS, which feeds the AC source, struggling to keep up!
 
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High inrush currents are typical, unfortunately, for the majority of PSUs out there. They are very short though and this is why in most cases they don't trip the circuit breakers. There are cases though where I see the online 3kVA UPS, which feeds the AC source, struggling to keep up!
Since you are master of PSUs, any good 1kW (therabouts) PSU that preferably has "gentle" inrush? Or just warning of which ones I should definitely NOT get. :D
 
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There are cases though where I see the online 3kVA UPS, which feeds the AC source, struggling to keep up!
American mains wiring. Its just hilarious.
In most of Europe we use three phase AC, with a regular 63A main fuse that gives one household a maximum power draw of 43.6kVA.
 
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