• Welcome to TechPowerUp Forums, Guest! Please check out our forum guidelines for info related to our community.

overclocking my 2500k

Joined
Sep 4, 2011
Messages
133 (0.05/day)
Likes
24
Location
Portugal
System Name Klean
Processor Ryzen 5 1600 @ 3.8GHz
Motherboard Asus ROG Strix B350-F
Cooling be quiet! Dark Rock 3
Memory 16GB (2x8GB) GSkill Rispjaws V 3066Mhz CL15 1T
Video Card(s) Saphire Pulse RX 560 4GB
Storage Crucial MX300 M.2 525GB - Western Digital Elements 2TB
Display(s) LG 29UM59-P - Freesync 21:9
Case Raijintek Thetis Window (Tempered Glass)
Audio Device(s) SupremeFX S1220
Power Supply Seasonic FOCUS Plus 550 Gold
Mouse A4Tech Bloody V5
Keyboard Alfawise V1 Mechanical
Software Windows 10
#26
what the offset does, is to give you a Vcore range, and you adjust it at your own taste.
for me the Vcore (in BIOS) was 1.28.
if you let everything at stock and boot into windows and start monitoring the voltages, you will see that when your CPU goes under load, the Vcore starts climbing up (0.904 -> 1.25 for me, with power savings). If you are in need to go further, just add some values in the BIOS.
Example: you want 1.4v under load - go into BIOS and in the offset voltage set a value like +0.12. what this does is add extra voltage to the reference voltage stated at the beginning, meaning your final voltage will be 1.28+0.12=1.4v under load (this may be not so linear, but its an idea of how it works).

if you set the voltage to fixed mode, the BIOS locks the voltage to a certain value. if you input 1.4v there, the voltage will remain fixed at 1.4v no matter what load you throw at the CPU (0%load = 1.4v, 100% = 1.4v) even with power savings enabled. I don't like this because you will see the difference in the electricity bill + shorten the lifetime of the CPU.

one last thing is, the setting on the Turbo Boost setting. it has a setting to bump the CPU voltage when the turbo kicks in. mine is on auto, and it seems to give around 0.01/0.02v more than the voltage from the offset, but i might be wrong.

for what I have experienced so far, this is what i can tell. if I am wrong, please let me know! :toast:
 

MxPhenom 216

Corsair Fanboy
Joined
Aug 31, 2010
Messages
12,164 (4.31/day)
Likes
3,715
Location
Seattle, WA
System Name The Battlestation
Processor Intel Core i7 4770k @ 4.2GHZ 1.275v
Motherboard MSi Z97 Gaming 5
Cooling EK Supremacy w/ EK Coolstream PE360
Memory G. Skill Trident X 16Gb (4x4GB) 2400mhz @ 1.65v
Video Card(s) MSi GTX1070 Gaming X 8GB @ 2GHz
Storage Samsung 830 128GB SSD, Crucial MX200 500GB, Seagate Barracuda 2TB (2x 1TB Partitions)
Display(s) Qnix QX2710 27" 2560 x 1440 PLS @ 100hz
Case Phantek Enthoo Evolv ATX TG
Audio Device(s) MSi Gaming AudioBoost ALC1150 w/ Sennheiser Game Ones
Power Supply Seasonic Flagship Prime Platinum 850
Mouse Steelseries Rival 310 w/ QCK Mass mat
Keyboard Corsair K70 w/ MX Browns and Red Backlit
Software Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Benchmark Scores Firestrike: 15439
#27
what the offset does, is to give you a Vcore range, and you adjust it at your own taste.
for me the Vcore (in BIOS) was 1.28.
if you let everything at stock and boot into windows and start monitoring the voltages, you will see that when your CPU goes under load, the Vcore starts climbing up (0.904 -> 1.25 for me, with power savings). If you are in need to go further, just add some values in the BIOS.
Example: you want 1.4v under load - go into BIOS and in the offset voltage set a value like +0.12. what this does is add extra voltage to the reference voltage stated at the beginning, meaning your final voltage will be 1.28+0.12=1.4v under load (this may be not so linear, but its an idea of how it works).

if you set the voltage to fixed mode, the BIOS locks the voltage to a certain value. if you input 1.4v there, the voltage will remain fixed at 1.4v no matter what load you throw at the CPU (0%load = 1.4v, 100% = 1.4v) even with power savings enabled. I don't like this because you will see the difference in the electricity bill + shorten the lifetime of the CPU.

one last thing is, the setting on the Turbo Boost setting. it has a setting to bump the CPU voltage when the turbo kicks in. mine is on auto, and it seems to give around 0.01/0.02v more than the voltage from the offset, but i might be wrong.

for what I have experienced so far, this is what i can tell. if I am wrong, please let me know! :toast:
yeah but i had 1.3v set in fixed mode, and then once i went to offset mode it stayed at 1.3 and then whatever offset voltage i added is tacked onto the 1.3??

My stock voltage when i started at stock was 1.2
 
Joined
Sep 4, 2011
Messages
133 (0.05/day)
Likes
24
Location
Portugal
System Name Klean
Processor Ryzen 5 1600 @ 3.8GHz
Motherboard Asus ROG Strix B350-F
Cooling be quiet! Dark Rock 3
Memory 16GB (2x8GB) GSkill Rispjaws V 3066Mhz CL15 1T
Video Card(s) Saphire Pulse RX 560 4GB
Storage Crucial MX300 M.2 525GB - Western Digital Elements 2TB
Display(s) LG 29UM59-P - Freesync 21:9
Case Raijintek Thetis Window (Tempered Glass)
Audio Device(s) SupremeFX S1220
Power Supply Seasonic FOCUS Plus 550 Gold
Mouse A4Tech Bloody V5
Keyboard Alfawise V1 Mechanical
Software Windows 10
#28
yeah but i had 1.3v set in fixed mode, and then once i went to offset mode it stayed at 1.3 and then whatever offset voltage i added is tacked onto the 1.3??

My stock voltage when i started at stock was 1.2
as I said, the offset increase may not be so linear... you might add a bit more to reflect just a little at load, because of LLC (voltage lowers at load).
what I find a bit strange, is when i let the PC idle, seeding something on utorrent and one other tracker i got. I had the hwmonitor open and went dinner, when I came back the max core voltage record was 1.30 :| (at load it does a maximum of 1.26).
I srly need to understand how this works...


the stock voltage when I started was 1.184 in windows (load). what I think is that the BIOS scales the voltage considering the multiplier you set, even in manual (maybe because of the "turbo boost voltage increse" setting in the BIOS).

btw, what program you guys use to see the temperatures? I use hwmonitor as reference for everything.

EDIT: *banging my head against the wall* i forgot to disable spread spectrum :shadedshu
I can confirm the higher multiplier, the higher the board sets the Vcore automaticly.
Also the turbo boost voltage increase setting seems to affect nothing at all.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Sep 4, 2009
Messages
967 (0.30/day)
Likes
221
System Name El Superbeasto V1.2
Processor Intel i5-2500k @ 5.0 ghz
Motherboard MSI Z77A-GD55
Cooling XSPC Raystorm CPU + 2 RX360 radiator + xspc Razor R9-290 w/ backplate
Memory 16gb G.skill Sniper 1866 ddr3 (9-9-9-24)
Video Card(s) XFX R9 290 w/ XSPC Razor full cover block and backplate
Storage Hyper-X 120gb-OS, WD Caviar black 2TB-Steam, Plextor M5S 256gb - MMOs+RTS games
Display(s) Samsung 23" 120hz 3d LCD w/ 3d glasses, using 'lightboost' trick
Case NZXT H630 white watercooling case
Audio Device(s) Soundblaster ZX + Sennheiser HD 598
Power Supply XFX Pro 850 XXX semi-modular
Software Windows 10 Pro (Had some mystery error on Win7 and decided to go W10)
#29
So, you liking the rig @ 4.5ghz? How does the performance feel compared to your old setup?
 
Top