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Peak laptop temps reaching almost 100°C

Worthis

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Hello, although i've undervolted my laptop , replaced its heatsink and thermal paste , and used a cooling pad it still manages to reach near 100 celsius while playing apex legends .I've got a MSI GF-65 10 SDR laptop with an 1660ti and 16 gb ram (slightly oc'd to run at 2933mhz) .Below are my throttlestop settings

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I was wondering if theres something i can do in order to further improve temps while keeping it at a relative high perfomance
 

unclewebb

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Not much you can do. You have too much CPU wit inadequate cooling to fully take advantage of its power.

You can slow it down by lowering Speed Shift Max or lower the turbo ratio limits or let it run at max temp.
 

Worthis

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Not much you can do. You have too much CPU wit inadequate cooling to fully take advantage of its power.

You can slow it down by lowering Speed Shift Max or lower the turbo ratio limits or let it run at max temp.
Could the higher temps occur due to the ram running at higher speeds than the default 2666mhz?Also, could further undervolt help the situation? I've tried setting it to -115 both core and cache and my pc froze , as far as i know those 2 dont need to be always the same value but i dont know which one i can try to tinker with.
 

unclewebb

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Higher temps and ram speed have very little to do with each other.

You are already at or beyond the typical stable undervolt limit for a 10750H. You cannot go further without losing stability. Some users get slightly better Cinebench scores when setting the core undervolt to a bigger number compared to the cache but this is not going to solve your problem.

MSI's decision to install a 10750H into a thin chassis was not a great decision. The cooling might be fine if you run this CPU at its 45W TDP rating. When you decide or MSI decides to set the turbo power limits to 200W, it is going to overheat and thermal throttle. No way to rewrite the laws of physics. More power equals more heat.
 

Worthis

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Not much you can do. You have too much CPU wit inadequate cooling to fully take advantage of its power.

You can slow it down by lowering Speed Shift Max or lower the turbo ratio limits or let it run at max temp.
i've set speed shift at 64 from 32 and played a while with log file on

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not much of a change ,about 1-2 celcius difference , i've also attached the log file just in case
 

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unclewebb

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not much of a change
I would not expect much change by adjusting the Speed Shift EPP value from 32 to 64.

Your screenshot shows that at 60W, your CPU is reaching 100°C. If you want lower temps, reduce the PL1 and PL2 power limits from 200W down to 55W or 50W. This will cause some power limit throttling instead of thermal throttling so yes, this will reduce performance.

A thin laptop is not designed for both maximum performance and acceptable temperatures. Sacrificing some performance is the only way you are going to reduce temperatures. Instead of reducing the power limits you can also try reducing the turbo ratio limits. Not sure which will be smoother so give each option a try.

There is lots of TVB - Thermal Velocity Boost throttling. This reduces the CPU speed 100 MHz when the CPU reaches ~70°C. In your situation, this type of throttling is necessary.
 

Worthis

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Not much you can do. You have too much CPU wit inadequate cooling to fully take advantage of its power.

You can slow it down by lowering Speed Shift Max or lower the turbo ratio limits or let it run at max temp.
ive misread your previous comment about speed shift, i lowered the max value down to 45 to test the perfomance/temps balance
I would not expect much change by adjusting the Speed Shift EPP value from 32 to 64.

Your screenshot shows that at 60W, your CPU is reaching 100°C. If you want lower temps, reduce the PL1 and PL2 power limits from 200W down to 55W or 50W. This will cause some power limit throttling instead of thermal throttling so yes, this will reduce performance.

A thin laptop is not designed for both maximum performance and acceptable temperatures. Sacrificing some performance is the only way you are going to reduce temperatures. Instead of reducing the power limits you can also try reducing the turbo ratio limits. Not sure which will be smoother so give each option a try.

There is lots of TVB - Thermal Velocity Boost throttling. This reduces the CPU speed 100 MHz when the CPU reaches ~70°C. In your situation, this type of throttling is necessary.
as for reducing turbo ratio limits , how should i proceed?lowering each by a certain amount or certain cores only?


Edit: I've done some tests with r23and only had about 50 points difference between setting speed shift max at 45/40.Also attached new logs recorded during benchmark
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unclewebb

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how should i proceed?
You can use ThrottleStop to decide the heat - performance balance that is right for you. I have never owned a 10th Gen laptop so I have no advice to give you.

Your choice is to slow your computer down, reduce the power limits or leave it as is and let it constantly bounce off the 95C thermal throttling temperature. Do lots of testing to see what works best.
 
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