1. Welcome to TechPowerUp Forums, Guest! Please check out our forum guidelines for info related to our community.

Power Supply Randomly stops outputting power?

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by Rehmanpa, Aug 10, 2017.

  1. Rehmanpa

    Joined:
    May 19, 2017
    Messages:
    228 (2.38/day)
    Thanks Received:
    61
    I have a strange power supply issue that I am in some serious need of help to resolve. I've spent quite a bit of time researching it with no resolution. I have an Ethereum mining rig that uses two power supplies, a corsair AX 1200, and a Seasonic 1250 Gold PSU. I have it connected via a dual power supply adapter.

    In order to get all 5 GPUs to show up in windows, I had to plug the seasonic power supply into the main 24 pin, and the corsair into the secondary 24 pin slot. This ran just fine. I had it running like this for several days until about 2 days ago things went haywire. The machine shut itself off, and several hours later I went to investigate. I tried swapping the seasonic to the secondary PSU adapter and the corsair to the primary, and this allowed the machine to actually post. The seasonic psu was drawing zero watts from my killowatt meter, and only the 3 GPUs which were plugged into the corsair PSU were showing up on the device manager. Eventually I took the Seasonic power supply out of the machine, plugged it into a different computer where it started up just fine, then I plugged it back into the machine and everything ran fine. This worked for about a day. Then today, the thing turned off again. I went out to investigate and just like before, the seasonic power supply was only drawing about 3.8watts of power. I am going to try plugging it back into my other machine tomorrow to see if it will fix it, but I really need a solution for this. I can't keep unplugging it and plugging it back into the other computer.

    Does anybody have any ideas/solutions for my problem? I am thinking (however unlikely it is) that maybe it's the PSU adapter that's causing the issues? Because they were running fine for several days, and then this stuff started happening. I'm really in need of some help, hopefully one of you TPU members will know how to fix this.

    Thanks

    Also, I have the CPUs plugged into the corsair PSU, which is plugged into the secondary adapter, and 3 of my GPUs with it. The other 2 are plugged into the seasonic, and the only way for those 2 to get registered was by plugging it into my main 24pin adapter slot (not the secondary one).
     
  2. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2006
    Messages:
    3,030 (0.75/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,985
    Location:
    Nebraska, USA
    Where do the two PSUs get their power? If different wall outlets, I would run a small grounding wire between the two supplies just to make sure they have a "common" ground. If running through UPS to different wall outlets, then strap the two UPS grounds together. I would also use an AC Outlet Tester to ensure your outlet is properly wired and grounded. If not in the US, you should be able to find a similar tester for your mains connector at your local home improvement store. If the tester reports a problem, you need to have a certified electrician fix it.
     
    10 Year Member at TPU
  3. verycharbroiled

    Joined:
    May 8, 2016
    Messages:
    130 (0.28/day)
    Thanks Received:
    81
    Location:
    northeast USA
    perhaps one of the psus internal protection is kicking in for some reason. usually the only way internal protection gets reset is to remove ac power to it via switch or unplugging the ac cord. give it some time to reset (several minutes maybe) and try to fire it up again.

    as others have mentioned both psus need to be at the same ground potential, both at the ac outlet and between the ground pins of the psus themselves. or weird things can happen.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2017
  4. Rehmanpa

    Joined:
    May 19, 2017
    Messages:
    228 (2.38/day)
    Thanks Received:
    61
    I've tried giving it time and it doesn't work. Only way i solved this previously was plugging it into another pc, letting it boot up, then putting this one back into my miner and it magically fixed it.


    I made (with my electrician friend) an outside outlet panel box which is connected to dual 20amp circuits in my circuit breakers. I have 2 heavy duty extension cords, one plugged into each out circuit, hooked up to the box I made. How would I run a grounding wire between the two? Also, how come when I plugged it into that other PC and it turned on, then plugged it into this one it seemed to work?
     
  5. Aquinus

    Aquinus Resident Wat-man

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    10,157 (4.99/day)
    Thanks Received:
    5,205
    Location:
    Concord, NH
    If they're different circuits, couldn't that be a bad idea if they're isolated grounds? I feel like that's just asking for a ground loop.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2017
    eidairaman1 says thanks.
  6. Rehmanpa

    Joined:
    May 19, 2017
    Messages:
    228 (2.38/day)
    Thanks Received:
    61
    It's been working just fine up until about 2 days ago. It had been running for weeks without an issue. I just got the seasonic psu and it had been working fine for I think the last week and then things went crazy. Should I take like a metal wire and electrical tape it from the psu to the case with the other one in it?
     
  7. Aquinus

    Aquinus Resident Wat-man

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    10,157 (4.99/day)
    Thanks Received:
    5,205
    Location:
    Concord, NH
    This is what concerns me:
    Servers with redundant power supplies usually use something to bridge the two PSUs together before providing that power to the motherboard. You might be killing your hardware by running it like this. I don't actively have a good suggestion other than not doing it that way.
     
    eidairaman1 says thanks.
  8. Rehmanpa

    Joined:
    May 19, 2017
    Messages:
    228 (2.38/day)
    Thanks Received:
    61
    I'm using an adapter like this: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DL3L2J6/?tag=tec06d-20
     
  9. Mr.Scott

    Mr.Scott

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2012
    Messages:
    792 (0.47/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,160
    Location:
    Spencerport NY
    The obvious answer is RMA the Seasonic. It's not working correctly.
    Every once and a while you get a lemon. It happens to every manufacturer.
     
    eidairaman1 says thanks.
  10. Aquinus

    Aquinus Resident Wat-man

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    10,157 (4.99/day)
    Thanks Received:
    5,205
    Location:
    Concord, NH
    That's definitely the bottom line.
     
    eidairaman1 says thanks.
  11. Rehmanpa

    Joined:
    May 19, 2017
    Messages:
    228 (2.38/day)
    Thanks Received:
    61
    I can't do that because I bought it off Craigslist unless I can still file a warranty request for it. But the thing works normally in another computer.
     
  12. Mr.Scott

    Mr.Scott

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2012
    Messages:
    792 (0.47/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,160
    Location:
    Spencerport NY
    Then the Seasonic doesn't like the adapter. It trips the protections.
    You'll need a different PSU.
     
    eidairaman1 says thanks.
  13. jaggerwild

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2008
    Messages:
    1,181 (0.37/day)
    Thanks Received:
    561
    Its gimped, what do you want us to tell you? Its OK use it? Then have at it, if it works in another then swap that PSU for it. Seems to me you had too much power with them both. The 1 doesn't want to work with the other, so don't do it.
     
  14. Rehmanpa

    Joined:
    May 19, 2017
    Messages:
    228 (2.38/day)
    Thanks Received:
    61
    So should I try getting a different adapter? Because it had been working fine then it suddenly seemed to stop working.

    Well if you're asking me what I want you to tell me my answer would be a solution. What do you mean I have too much power with both of them? I have them each running on a separate 20amp circuit which would allow for more than 2000watts each, and considering that they're a 1250 and 1200 watt psu respectively, this should be a non issue. It had been working fine and I was hoping someone had some ideas about why it might have stopped working. Someone mentioned a ground loop, how could I effectively deal with that?
     
  15. Mr.Scott

    Mr.Scott

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2012
    Messages:
    792 (0.47/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,160
    Location:
    Spencerport NY
    The issue isn't with the adapter, it's with the Seasonic.
    That's what you need to change out.
     
  16. Rehmanpa

    Joined:
    May 19, 2017
    Messages:
    228 (2.38/day)
    Thanks Received:
    61
    I'm going to try plugging it back into a different pc and seeing if it will work then like it had previously.
     
  17. MrGenius

    MrGenius

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2015
    Messages:
    1,168 (1.25/day)
    Thanks Received:
    890
    Location:
    On The Highway To Hell \m/
    All the adapter does it make it so the secondary PSU gets turned off and on in sync with the primary PSU. Other than that the 2 PSUs operate completely independently of each other. Meaning...yeah...the adapter is definitely not the problem.

    Oh...and the ground loop hypothesis is also lacking any sense. They are on separated circuits...again...operating completely independent of each other as far as power input/output..
     
    Mr.Scott says thanks.
  18. Aquinus

    Aquinus Resident Wat-man

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    10,157 (4.99/day)
    Thanks Received:
    5,205
    Location:
    Concord, NH
    Any time you connect two grounds together, you open the possibility of creating a ground loop because two grounds don't always have the same electric potential, even if they're a common ground. On paper, it's supposed to be 0v but, in reality two grounds might not have a 0v potential difference for a variety of reasons which become more apparent when they're isolated. The most basic reason would be current getting induced on it from being next to the hot wire or a device is putting power into ground when it shouldn't be. Either way, this shouldn't be an issue because the guy hasn't connected the two grounds together.

    If the PSUs are connected directly together, they might be causing problems. The adapter by itself shouldn't cause issues but, if more than one PSU is plugged into the motherboard aside from that adapter, bad things could happen.

    https://superuser.com/questions/681919/using-multiple-power-supplies-in-one-pc
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2017
    Mr.Scott says thanks.
  19. Rehmanpa

    Joined:
    May 19, 2017
    Messages:
    228 (2.38/day)
    Thanks Received:
    61
    I'm going to be taking some wires and trying to make sure everything is grounded together In case it's an issue like that. I don't understand though why it had been working and then it suddenly stopped, then worked for a day and stoped. Seems weird to me. It's not like the psu is even being pushed that hard, just 2 r9 290s. And for a 1250s that's hardly anything.
     
  20. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2006
    Messages:
    3,030 (0.75/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,985
    Location:
    Nebraska, USA
    That is EXACTLY why you must have a "common" ground! You are asking for a ground loop if you have more than one isolated ground so that is all the more IMMEDIATE reason to tie the two grounds together.

    And for the record, no facility should have two separate isolated grounds - ever. If such an event occurred, a difference in potential is highly likely and it could cause someone to, for example, have one hand on a metal bread toaster who then grabs with the other hand the cold water faucet or refrigerator handle and gets zapped! Not good. If they have a heart pacemaker, it could be deadly. Other symptoms could include induced hum or buzzing in audio circuits, "noise" in video circuits, "ripple" riding DC, or disruption/instability in other circuits - especially high-speed, low voltage data circuits.

    Problems with EMI/RFI (electromagnetic or radio frequency interference) being emitted or insufficiently suppressed can happen without proper system/common grounds.

    Even two isolated circuits in the same facility should have a common ground to prevent a difference of potential. If there is no difference of potential, there can be no current flow between them.

    So the objective is to tie all the grounds together.

    You are assuming everything was in perfect condition before. There could easily be a loose wire somewhere that is affected by vibrations from heavy footfalls, or even simple expansion/contraction of matter as the room heats up and cools down throughout the day.

    This is why I said to test your outlets.
    The easiest way is to run a small wire attached to a case screw of one PSU to a case screw of the other PSU. Note there will be very little current so a small 22 AWG gauge "hook-up" wire will do just fine.

    And FTR, running two different extension cords is definitely not ideal. No two lengths of wire have the exact same resistance. This is even more so when you have connectors at each end. When the resistance to earth ground is different you WILL have different ground potentials. So once again, all the more reason to make sure the two PSUs are connected to the same "common" ground.
     
    Aquinus says thanks.
    10 Year Member at TPU
  21. verycharbroiled

    Joined:
    May 8, 2016
    Messages:
    130 (0.28/day)
    Thanks Received:
    81
    Location:
    northeast USA
    take a multimeter and measure the voltage across the psu cases (connect to a screw on the cases for a good connection) while powered up see what comes up. hopefully 0.000v

    when using dual psus i usually take a 18 gauge wire with lugs and screw it into each psu via the psu screw mounting holes. usually isnt needed but hey its easy and cheap.

    and if the psus are are on different branch circuits there may be a ground loop.. depends on how good the house wiring is.

    ground loops suck. i run into them a lot in live sound reinforcement as stuff gets plugged into different branch circuits. sometimes we wind up using ground lifts.
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2017
  22. Rehmanpa

    Joined:
    May 19, 2017
    Messages:
    228 (2.38/day)
    Thanks Received:
    61
    I took a wire, put two (I think they're called wire nuts) and screwed one into the first psu and the other end into the same spot on the other one (in the case psu mount screw hole). No success :(
    Going to try hooking up to different pc soon
     
  23. DeathtoGnomes

    DeathtoGnomes

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2014
    Messages:
    1,503 (1.33/day)
    Thanks Received:
    768
    Location:
    SE Michigan
    Aquinus says thanks.

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guest)