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PSU with switch between single and multi rail

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#1
Recently i spotted that psu to be on nice deal and most probably will buy it:
https://www.corsair.com/eu/en/Power/Plug-Type/hxi-series-2017-config/p/CP-9020138-EU
But one thing makes me curious: it has a switch to set operational mode between single and multi rail. If i understand correctly this is something what requires proper layout on psu's pcb so it can be just single or just multi or am i wrong? Can be one psu both and have option to switch between both modes?
 
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#3
I'd check the CPU against the rating list (in my signature)

HXi series is top tier, so should work as you expect
 
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#5
Thanks for letting me know about this list, seems like change of purchase decision from seasonic focus plus (tier 2 on that list) to this one (tier1) is good, especially as price difference is fairly small.
 
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#7
LOL, the difference will not be noticeable except on testing equipment. If the Focus is cheaper, get it.

That said, you can also easily rock at 650W PSU with that setup and overclock both as well as have headroom... can save you even more money.
850 will give me more headroom which will be possibly needed as i plan to purchase top navi gpu once it will be released. Focus is cheaper by just about 10% so...
 
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#9
The main reason there are multi rail PSU nowadays is because there are some restrictions with regards to how much current can be passed through a single conductor. So manufactures got around that by increasing the number of rails.

There is really no advantage or disadvantage. If anything, single rail is better because sometimes GPUs can draw so much power it can trigger OCP protections ,even though electrically everything is fine.
 
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#10
The main reason there are multi rail PSU nowadays is because there are some restrictions with regards to how much current can be passed through a single conductor. So manufactures got around that by increasing the number of rails.
Nowadays, it is not as common to find TRUE multi-rail PSUs... There are MONSTER single rail PSUs out there.
 
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#11
Now decision is settled: shop changed price of that corsair psu and it is 10% cheaper than seasonic focus plus 650W.
 
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#12
There really isn't a reason to change it off single rail.
^^^This^^^

The main reason there are multi rail PSU nowadays is because there are some restrictions with regards to how much current can be passed through a single conductor. So manufactures got around that by increasing the number of rails.
Sorry, but that is not, and never was true. That is not how electricity works. The current through any circuit is determined by the demand the load puts on the supply. If the demand on the 12V circuit is 300W, the PSU will deliver 12 volts at 25 amps (12V x 25A = 300W). It does not matter if the supply is a 500W supply or a 1000W supply.

So it is then up to the motherboard designer to ensure any demands through any motherboard circuit do not exceed the ATX standards. Note for graphics cards, the PCIe standard allows for a maximum of 75W through the PCIe slot. But we all know many cards demand much more than that so they get their additional power via separate power cables directly from the PSU.

It is not about restrictions on current that can be passed through a conductor. Nor is it about manufacturers getting around those restrictions (except graphics card makers). In fact, multiple rails imposes restrictions! Why? If you have a supply that is rated for 500W at 12V, and that 12V is split between two rails, then the maximum the supply can deliver on any one rail is 250W! What if your monster graphics card needs 300W. You will be out of luck because in effect, you just have two small 250W PSUs when what you need is a 300+ watt supply.

There are more sophisticated multi-rail supplies that can automatically redistribute some of the available power from one rail to another rail. But they must always leave some in reserve on all rails. And note those supplies are also more expensive and more complex with more components that might fail.

So in multi-rail supplies, there will always be restrictions preventing delivery of the full capability of the supply. :(

In a single rail, full power is always available.

Multiple rail PSUs for computers really are just a marketing gimmick. In other electronics, where power "isolation" is desired for "fault tolerance" scenarios (where you don't want a failure in one connected device to take down another) multi-rail supplies may be desired. In a data center, for example, you might have an equipment rack populated with 10 server computers, all powered from a single power supply. You don't want a fault in the power circuit for one computer to take out the remaining nine servers. So that PSU would be multi-rail with each rail being isolated from the other.

In a single PC with a multi-rail PSU, if you lose the 12V to your motherboard, does it really matter if you still got 12V going to the graphics card? No. To your fans or drives? No.

There is really no advantage or disadvantage.
Ummm, sorry, but also not true. As I noted above, a major disadvantage is some of the PSU's capability must be reserved for each rail - even if that rail is unused. Multi-rail PSUs are more complex, thus they have more potential failure points, and they cost more. On a single rail system, all the power is available. They use a simpler design for more reliability and lower costs.
 
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#15
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#16
How much is the 650W version of the Corsair?
Local stores use PLN currency. Seasonic focus plus 650 is around 500pln, mentioned corsair hx 850W is at the moment 450pln, this particular store doesn't have hx650 but hx750 and this one is 600pln. All of these 80+ platinum certification.
 

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#17
Local stores use PLN currency. Seasonic focus plus 650 is around 500pln, mentioned corsair hx 850W is at the moment 450pln, this particular store doesn't have hx650 but hx750 and this one is 600pln. All of these 80+ platinum certification.
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page447.htm

http://www.orionpsudb.com/corsair

Channel Well Technology is the OEM, 750hxi is a custom pcb, so it's brand specific pcb, you wont find this in antec, coolermaster etc.
 
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#18
I know, it never is with you. Spare me the wall of text.
Then do your homework first, research and learn the facts before posting. Bing Google is your friend. It really is that simple.
More PSU...more bettah!
:( Same with this. A little homework would reveal the truth. Power supplies tend to be most efficient when run with 50 - 60% loads most of the time. If the supply is way oversized, they could be running at 20 or 30% most of the time and wasting energy - even with a quality 80 PLUS supply.

You don't want to max out the supply all the time, and some headroom is wise for future upgrades (and quieter operation). But more PSU is NOT necessarily "more bettah".
I fully disagree with the whole trying to buy the least powerful/least expensive option you can find that will suffice.
I fully agree with this. I don't know who suggested otherwise - certainly no one in this thread. I have always recommended getting a "quality" supply from a quality maker since EVERYTHING inside the computer case depends on good, clean stable power. But users don't need to buy Platinum or Titanium certified or the most expensive, biggest supply they can find either. I would not suggest Platinum unless it was on sale at a "too good to pass up" price. I generally recommend at least Bronze and preferably Gold certified - with the total understanding 80 PLUS certification does NOT imply quality or reliability.
 
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#19
Power supplies tend to be most efficient when run with 50 - 60% loads most of the time. I
True, but the difference is literally 1% or so between 50 and 75%, nearly negligible. I prefer to run my PSUs around the 75% mark (this is stress testing fully loaded GPU and CPU - not a gaming load). I have a few more ducketts in my pocket left and no hardware is worse for the wear. ;)

I don't know who suggested otherwise
I recommended a 650W unit... but of high quality... A 650W unit is plenty for Navi (assuming 300W here) and this CPU both overclocked and with plenty of headroom. That said, of these two options, I DID in fact suggest the least powerful and least expensive option.....but only because I know those options are both top notch PSUs and will EASILY handle his current and proposed system.
 

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#20
Back on topic, please.
If you want to discuss personal business, take it to PMs.
Quit the personal bickering.

Thank You.
 
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#21
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#22
... I would not suggest Platinum unless it was on sale at a "too good to pass up" price. I generally recommend at least Bronze and preferably Gold certified - with the total understanding 80 PLUS certification does NOT imply quality or reliability.
Since shop changed price of that hx850 this is the cheapest platinum psu i've seen since i'm watching psus prices which is about 6 months.
 

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#23
Since shop changed price of that hx850 this is the cheapest platinum psu i've seen since i'm watching psus prices which is about 6 months.
If you can get yourself a gold base get yourself a gold base
 
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#24
If you can get yourself a gold base get yourself a gold base
I agree. Unless that HX850 Platinum is priced super low (in the "Gold" range), you don't need to spend the money for the Platinum logo.
 
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#25
:( Same with this. A little homework would reveal the truth. Power supplies tend to be most efficient when run with 50 - 60% loads most of the time. If the supply is way oversized, they could be running at 20 or 30% most of the time and wasting energy - even with a quality 80 PLUS supply.

You don't want to max out the supply all the time, and some headroom is wise for future upgrades (and quieter operation). But more PSU is NOT necessarily "more bettah".
1. The higher the efficiency of the PSU = the less any of that is relevant.
2. If you're going for the least powerful unit that will suffice for your needs, you're probably going to be running it at higher than 50-60% loads frequently. And you'll be losing a bit of efficiency then too. Factoring in that sweet spot for efficiency generally means a significantly more powerful PSU than one might theoretically be able to get away with(like basically 2x as much power as you "need").
3. Not that efficiency should be a primary concern when purchasing a PSU. What you want is enough power to handle the loads you'll be giving it without stressing components to a premature death(as in be able to handle 50-60% or more for the long run). And/or a PSU with high enough quality components to handle being stressed to near max output capacity for extended periods without resulting in premature death(if you insist on going the "barely enough" route).
4. The price of PSUs seems to be coming down lately. Making you far better off to get a spendy one that has excellent efficiency and a very high power output capacity with a 10 year warranty. Buy 1 and done!!!
 
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