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Rambus Innovates 8.4 Gbps HBM3-ready Memory Subsystem

btarunr

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Rambus Inc., a premier chip and silicon IP provider making data faster and safer, today announced the Rambus HBM3-ready memory interface subsystem consisting of a fully-integrated PHY and digital controller. Supporting breakthrough data rates of up to 8.4 Gbps, the solution can deliver over a terabyte per second of bandwidth, more than double that of high-end HBM2E memory subsystems. With a market-leading position in HBM2/2E memory interface deployments, Rambus is ideally suited to enable customers' implementations of accelerators using next-generation HBM3 memory.

"The memory bandwidth requirements of AI/ML training are insatiable with leading-edge training models now surpassing billions of parameters," said Soo Kyoum Kim, associate vice president, Memory Semiconductors at IDC. "The Rambus HBM3-ready memory subsystem raises the bar for performance enabling state-of-the-art AI/ML and HPC applications."



Rambus achieves HBM3 operation of up to 8.4 Gbps leveraging over 30 years of high-speed signaling expertise, and a strong history of 2.5D memory system architecture design and enablement. In addition to the fully-integrated HBM3-ready memory subsystem, Rambus provides its customers with interposer and package reference designs to speed their products to market.

"With the performance achieved by our HBM3-ready memory subsystem, designers can deliver the bandwidth needed by the most demanding designs," said Matt Jones, general manager of Interface IP at Rambus. "Our fully-integrated PHY and digital controller solution builds on our broad installed base of HBM2 customer deployments and is backed by a full suite of support services to ensure first-time right implementations for mission-critical AI/ML designs."

Benefits of the Rambus HBM3-ready Memory Interface Subsystem:
  • Supports up to 8.4 Gbps data rate delivering bandwidth of 1.075 Terabytes per second (TB/s)
  • Reduces ASIC design complexity and speeds time to market with fully-integrated PHY and digital controller
  • Delivers full bandwidth performance across all data traffic scenarios
  • Supports HBM3 RAS features
  • Includes built-in hardware-level performance activity monitor
  • Provides access to Rambus system and SI/PI experts helping ASIC designers to ensure maximum signal and power integrity for devices and systems
  • Includes 2.5D package and interposer reference design as part of IP license
  • Features LabStation development environment that enables quick system bring-up, characterization and debug
  • Enables the highest performance in applications including state-of-the-art AI/ML training and high-performance computing (HPC) systems

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For those of you who are just now learning Rambus is still around: yes, yes indeed they are. And they actually do build their own IP still and aren't just patent mongering. They've gotten much better over the years about not suing literally everyone for breathing, but they're still major holders of controller logic IP and get tons from licensing.
 
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For those of you who are just now learning Rambus is still around: yes, yes indeed they are. And they actually do build their own IP still and aren't just patent mongering. They've gotten much better over the years about not suing literally everyone for breathing, but they're still major holders of controller logic IP and get tons from licensing.
And it looks like they are again contributing to tech advancement. Kinda cool to see IMO.
 
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