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Slipstream drivers into Windows 7

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#1
Anyone have a procedure on how to do this?
 

brandonwh64

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#3
Oh sweet, I thought that only worked with Vista.
 

kristain

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#4
1. Find and download the latest drivers for your computer. Either way gather all of your drivers for your new install organized and ready for slipstreaming.
2. After installing the Windows 7 OEM Pre-installation Kit you will need to have your Windows 7 installation disk or .iso available. In my case I had the .iso since I used the MSDN download.
3. I chose to extract my .iso using WinRar but there are so many other makers of .iso extractors it will be easy to extract the iso. If all you have is the DVD, then you can use UltaIso to make a duplicate image of your disk into an .iso form. I am only telling you what In used. If you are doing the disk version you can extract the image again after you make your image or you can copy the files of the disk directly, I would recommend making the image and then extracting it.
4. Locate install.wim in your extracted windows 7 files and folders “\sources\install.wim”. The install.wim is the files that you are going to modify and inject drivers into using the Windows 7 OPK / DISM.exe utility. I found it best to copy the install.wim file to another folder.
5. Next locate your DISM.exe file. This is what actually mounts the install.wim image and allows you to inject the .wim file with your third-party drivers. It then seals the image back up and let you copy the new install.wim file back to the place you originally took it from on the extracted .iso folder in case you forgot it was ““\sources\install.wim””
6. In order to run DISM.exe you will need to access it from an elevated command prompt. I finally found that an elevated command prompt means to run the CMD from the exact location of the file or .exe you are running. in my case I had to run an elevated command prompt from the location or folder that the DISM.exe was in. FINALLY, I was able to mount the install.wim image and get to work. This is where the actual driver injection took place, right here in the DISM command utility.
 

sylbaris

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#5
I'm working on building an HTPC, and I plan on installing Windows 7 Professional 64-bit on a RAID array of two 2 TB drives. The problem? According to various Newegg reviews and other places online, the RAID card requires a floppy - which ain't gonna happen. Slipstream time! I'd used nLite quite a bit with XP back in the day, and I'd heard of vLite, but I also hadn't heard anything good about vLite and Windows 7 (if you all have something positive to say about it, please share).

After searching around for quite some time, I came along this post. It wasn't extra-ordinarily helpful, but I came across something similar not long after. In fact, it would appear that Kristain grabbed his/her post from the beginning of some guy named Frankie's blog, which was really only a partial tutorial anyway.

I realize that this may be coming off as snarky, but I've been struggling with this process forever, and I wanted to share what I've found in the hopes it helps someone else. Below you'll see Frankie's complete tutorial, along with my additions indented along the way. As of this writing, I've successfully slipstreamed the drivers, but I haven't tested it, yet. I have to wait for the parts to come in. I'll try to remember to update then.

Steps to Slipstream Windows 7 with your Third-Party drivers:

1. Find and download all of your latest drivers for your machine (32-bit or 64-bit) depending on the installer version. Either way gather all of your drivers for your new install organized and ready for slipstreaming. Please note sometimes you can find a dedicated Windows 7 driver already, if so use that one, otherwise the vista driver will also work. However, in the case of a Raid controller I only want to use the windows 7 driver and not the vista one.

You need to download the appropriate drivers and then extract them into directories using 7-zip or something similar. It's important that these are all directories, as it actually searches through them for the various inf files found within.​

2. After installing the Windows 7 OEM Pre-installation Kit you will need to have your Windows 7 installation disk or .iso available. In my case I had the .iso since I used the MSDN download.

No idea what the OEM Pre-installation Kit is for (and it required a login to get it) - I used the Windows Automated Installation Kit in all the ways I think that he used it, but I could be wrong.

In order to get an iso, download and install CDBurnerXPPro and use it to create an ISO of the media.​

3. I chose to extract my .iso using WinRar but there are so many other makers of .iso extractors it will be easy to extract the iso. If all you have is the DVD, then you can use UltaIso to make a duplicate image of your disk into an .iso form. I am only telling you what In used. If you are doing the disk version you can extract the image again after you make your image or you can copy the files of the disk directly, I would recommend making the image and then extracting it.

The Trial of UltraISO does not allow the saving of disc images over 300 MB - not saving or burning. The full version costs $30....unless you happened to PC User Magazine back in June of 2009. They offered it for free using the following registration information, courtesy of Raymond:

Name: PC User readers
Serial: 4BF9-8D1E-1786-30A8

Please notice that it only works for a very specific version of UltraISO - try googling uiso93pes.exe. As of this writing, I found it at this particular location, but it may not be there later.​

4. Locate install.wim in your extracted windows 7 files and folders “\sources\install.wim”. The install.wim is the files that you are going to modify and inject drivers into using the Windows 7 OPK / DISM.exe utility. I found it best to copy the install.wim file to another folder. This way I can work on this file and know I have the original install.wim exactly as it was before I started modifying it.

Create a folder in the C:/ drive called "test" and copy both the install.wim and the boot.wim into it (More on the latter later). Create three directories within the test folder - install, boot, and drivers. Copy the driver directories from step 1 (my version) into the drivers directory.​

5. Next locate your DISM.exe file. This is what actually mounts the install.wim image and allows you to inject the .wim file with your third-party drivers. It then seals the image back up and let you copy the new install.wim file back to the place you originally took it from on the extracted .iso folder in case you forgot it was ““\sources\install.wim””

Skipped this step and it seemed to work fine.​

6. In order to run DISM.exe you will need to access it from an elevated command prompt. At first I was like ok, sure run cmd. Nope. It’s not exactly like that. I finally found that an elevated command prompt means to run the CMD from the exact location of the file or .exe you are running. in my case I had to run an elevated command prompt from the location or folder that the DISM.exe was in. All I did was hold shift while right clicking the folder that container DISM.exe. after the command prompt was displayer I typed DISM.exe and it opened the command line interface for DISM. FINALLY, I was able to mount the install.wim image and get to work. This is where the actual driver injection took place, right here in the DISM command utility.

Dism Command list here:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd744382(WS.10).aspx

How to get an elevated command prompt:

http://www.downloadsquad.com/2009/02/09/windows-7-tip-elevated-command-prompt-anywhere/

This is where the Windows Automated Installation Kit came into play (keep in mind it's an iso that needs to be burned and then installed). Once installed, look in Start Menu\Programs\Microsoft Windows AIK for the Deployment Tools Command Prompt and make sure to Run as Administrator, or you'll get an error.​

7. I mounted my copied install.wim image file that I am working with.

Dism /Mount-Wim /WimFile:C:\test\images\install.wim

http://technet.microsoft.com/ja-jp/library/dd772580(WS.10).aspx

The correct command is:

dism /mount-wim /wimfile:c:\test\install.wim /index:1 /mountdir:c:\test\install​

8. I added drivers to the install.wim file using:

Dism /image:C:\test\offline /Add-Driver /driver:C:\test\drivers /recurse

Note: This will recurse and add drivers from the organized driver folder we have in step 1.

Given my setup (as detailed in earlier steps), the correct command is:

dism /image:c:\test\install /add-driver /driver:c:\test\drivers /recurse​

9. I commit and unmount all the new driver changes I made to this wim file:

Dism /Commit-Wim /MountDir:C:\test\offline

Different setup, different command.

dism /commit-wim /mountdir:c:\test\install​

10. Copy the new updated install.wim to the extracted Windows 7 iso folder. put it back in the same place you got it from before working with it and updating it. Obviously, in order for the new installation to work you will need to overwrite the install.wim file.

For the disc to recognize the raid array on boot, you'll need to repeat the process with the boot.wim, which is why you copied it over to the directory back in the amended step 4. As a result, you'll need to run the following commands in the prompt (after deleting all but the RAID drivers from the drivers directory - why unnecessarily bloat the damn thing? Alternatively, give a more specific location in the second command):

dism /mount-wim /wimfile:c:\test\boot.wim /index:1 /mountdir:c:\test\boot

dism /image:c:\test\boot /add-driver /driver:c:\test\drivers /recurse

dism /commit-wim /mountdir:c:\test\boot​

11. Burn a new updated and Slipstreamed Windows 7 DVD that has your new install.wim. What’s funny is this is the part that actually was the hardest. In order for me to do this without just making frisbee. I had to make a bootable disk. Unfortunately just checking bootable in your disk burning software isn’t enough (nero sucks btw). You have to extract the boot file from the original disk or mounted image and then reinject it into your new .iso image at burn time. How did I do this? I used again the UltraIso utility. To be honest, this was far better than any .iso tool I found for this job of boot file extraction and reinjection.

The short version of this is that you open up the Windows 7 media in UltraISO, navigate to the sources folder, and drag and drop the newly created install.wim and boot.wim files from the test directory and into the right-hand pane in UltraISO. It will ask if you want to replace the files - double-check that they're bigger and agree to it.​

12. Once I was able to burn a DVD with the proper boot file that was extracted from the original disk image, I was able to install windows 7 properly with all boot settings configured in my bios. At this point I have successfully Slipstreamed my Windows 7 64-bit install using DISM.exe and install.wim and UltraIso.

Here's to hoping that it works. :banghead: