• We've upgraded our forums. Please post any issues/requests in this thread.

Spire Introduces BlueStar LED Series Case Fans

btarunr

Editor & Senior Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 9, 2007
Messages
34,321 (9.23/day)
Likes
17,423
Location
Hyderabad, India
System Name Long shelf-life potato
Processor Intel Core i7-4770K
Motherboard ASUS Z97-A
Cooling Xigmatek Aegir CPU Cooler
Memory 16GB Kingston HyperX Beast DDR3-1866
Video Card(s) 2x GeForce GTX 970 SLI
Storage ADATA SU800 512GB
Display(s) Samsung U28D590D 28-inch 4K
Case Cooler Master CM690 Window
Audio Device(s) Creative Sound Blaster Recon3D PCIe
Power Supply Corsair HX850W
Mouse Razer Abyssus 2014
Keyboard Microsoft Sidewinder X4
Software Windows 10 Pro Creators Update
#1
Spire Corp introduced today their new line of BlueStar DC Fan LED Series. The BlueStar LED fans are high quality, LED colored and silent cooling fans for the PC gamer and PC enthusiast. Based on the original BlueStar fan blade design these new LED series are destined to be a big hit. Top of the line components and features are applied to build these powerful LED fans.

Included is a PWM auto fan speed control and for the ones who like to keep control in their own hands we have also included PCI manual fan speed control unit. To make the BlueStar fan series extra silent we have included 4 rubber anti-vibe mounts to install the fan and stop any fan vibration. Trust the brand with the industry leading experience and 3-year warranty, Spire.

Show full news post
 
Joined
Nov 13, 2007
Messages
6,139 (1.67/day)
Likes
1,634
Location
Austin Texas
System Name silen8
Processor Intel i7 7820X Delidded @ 4.64Ghz / 3.1Ghz Mesh
Motherboard MSI X299 Tomahawk
Cooling 240mm Corsair H105 Intake
Memory 32 GB Quad 3434Mhz DDR4 15-16-16-38-300-1T
Video Card(s) Gigabyte GTX 1080 Ti Gaming
Storage 1Tb Samsung 960 Pro m2, 1TB Samsung 850 Pro SSD
Display(s) Dell 24" 2560x1440 144hz, G-Sync @ 165Hz
Case NZXT S340 Elite Black
Audio Device(s) Arctis 7
Power Supply FSP HydroG 750W
Mouse zowie ec-2
Keyboard corsair k65 tenkeyless
Software Windows 10 64 Bit
Benchmark Scores Cb: 2103 Multi, 209 Single, 10450 Timespy - 10150 GPU/11900 CPU, superpi 1M - 7.71s
#2
coolermaster r4's anyone?
 
Joined
Jan 16, 2008
Messages
886 (0.24/day)
Likes
134
Location
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
Processor Intel Xeon X5670 Hexa-core @ 4.6GHz @ 1.35v
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-X58A-UD7
Cooling Swiftech H20 (w/Custom External Rad Enclosure)
Memory 6GB (3x2GB) G.Skill Trident 2000Mhz + 6GB (3x2GB) Corsair 1600Mhz DDR3
Video Card(s) EVGA GTX 980 SC
Storage 1TB Samsung 850 EVO
Display(s) Samsung BX2440 (24" LED Backlit)
Case Cooler Master 690 (w/Mods)
Audio Device(s) Creative X-Fi Titanium
Power Supply Corsair 750-TX
Software Windows 7 Ultimate (x64)
#3
Superior airflow and High air pressure
Noise Level 19~34
Air Flow 99.6CFM at 2,4000RPM

Sounds good to me. Might have to check one out. It does appear that they use sleeve bearings though :(
 
Joined
May 12, 2009
Messages
5,167 (1.65/day)
Likes
944
Processor Intel Core i5-3570K
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-Z77N-WIFI
Cooling Corsair A70 (Passive)
Memory Samsung 8GB MV-3V4G3D/US
Storage Samsung PM841 256GB
Display(s) Dell UltraSharp U2412M
Case BitFenix Prodigy (Arctic White)
Power Supply FSP Zen 400 (Fanless)
Software OS X 10.9.1 Mavericks
#4
Noise Level 19~34
Air Flow 99.6CFM at 2,4000RPM

Sounds good to me. Might have to check one out. It does appear that they use sleeve bearings though :(
phanbuey was right, these look exactly like CM R4's. Spire is known for rebranding products that are already out on the market. Take their Spire TherMax Eclipse II for example, there are like 4 variations of them on the market.
 

Athlon2K15

HyperVtX™
Joined
Sep 27, 2006
Messages
7,848 (1.92/day)
Likes
2,305
Location
O-H-I-O
Processor AMD Ryzen 7 1800x
Motherboard Asus Crosshair VI Hero
Cooling CH6 EK MonoBlock
Memory TridentZ 16GB DDR4 3600
Video Card(s) GTX 1080Ti EK Full Cover Block
Storage Samsung 960 Pro
Display(s) LG 34UC88 Curved Ultrawide
Case EVGA DG86
Power Supply Corsair RM850x
Mouse Asus Strix Evolve
Keyboard Asus Strix Claymore
#5
If it's the same fan and its cheaper more power to them
 
Joined
Nov 13, 2007
Messages
6,139 (1.67/day)
Likes
1,634
Location
Austin Texas
System Name silen8
Processor Intel i7 7820X Delidded @ 4.64Ghz / 3.1Ghz Mesh
Motherboard MSI X299 Tomahawk
Cooling 240mm Corsair H105 Intake
Memory 32 GB Quad 3434Mhz DDR4 15-16-16-38-300-1T
Video Card(s) Gigabyte GTX 1080 Ti Gaming
Storage 1Tb Samsung 960 Pro m2, 1TB Samsung 850 Pro SSD
Display(s) Dell 24" 2560x1440 144hz, G-Sync @ 165Hz
Case NZXT S340 Elite Black
Audio Device(s) Arctis 7
Power Supply FSP HydroG 750W
Mouse zowie ec-2
Keyboard corsair k65 tenkeyless
Software Windows 10 64 Bit
Benchmark Scores Cb: 2103 Multi, 209 Single, 10450 Timespy - 10150 GPU/11900 CPU, superpi 1M - 7.71s
#6
If it's the same fan and its cheaper more power to them
its exactly the same price. it does have PWM tho... so its the same fan just with PWM.
 
Joined
Oct 2, 2004
Messages
12,351 (2.56/day)
Likes
5,809
Location
Europe\Slovenia
System Name Dark Silence 2
Processor Intel Core i7 5820K @ 4.5 GHz (1.15V)
Motherboard MSI X99A Gaming 7
Cooling Cooler Master Nepton 120XL
Memory 32 GB DDR4 Kingston HyperX Fury 2400 MHz @ 2666 MHz 15-15-15-32 1T (1.25V)
Video Card(s) AORUS GeForce GTX 1080Ti 11GB (1950/11000 OC Mode)
Storage Samsung 850 Pro 2TB SSD (3D V-NAND)
Display(s) ASUS VG248QE 144Hz 1ms (DisplayPort)
Case Corsair Carbide 330R Titanium
Audio Device(s) Creative Sound BlasterX AE-5 + Altec Lansing MX5021 (HiFi capacitors and OPAMP upgrade)
Power Supply BeQuiet! Dark Power Pro 11 750W
Mouse Logitech G502 Proteus Spectrum
Keyboard Cherry Stream XT Black
Software Windows 10 Pro 64-bit (Fall Creators Update)
#7
Noise Level 19~34
Air Flow 99.6CFM at 2,4000RPM

Sounds good to me. Might have to check one out. It does appear that they use sleeve bearings though :(
Sleeve bearings are easy for maintenance. When you open them, all you have to do is to clean the internals and fill the lubricant chamber with new oil. Ball bearing based are a bit more problematic to repair. You have to open them, clean internals and especially bearings.
In general, the bearings are almost fully closed so dust isn't the problem as much as dry bearings. You have to submerge the entire bearing into oil and move it around violently to force oil to go inside through holes in the bearing housing. Take them out, rotate them a bit and repeat the process few times. Then you have to clean excessive oil from the housing and especially the part where the rotor goes through to prevent "sleeve bearing" effect inside the ball bearing as they are not attached together in a fixed way but the rotor still moves freely inside even if you block the ball bearing rotation. After doing that it's recommended to run such repaired fan for few minutes on lower RPM's (800-1000RPM) to let oil evenly spread inside. Much longer process than for sleeve bearings but from my experience it fixed a 7 years old stock AMD fan nearly perfectly from a noisy bastard to a silent fan again. At a cost of some oil. Not bad eh :) Haven't fixed any rifle bearing or fluid dynamic bearings yet...
 

naram-sin

New Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2009
Messages
103 (0.03/day)
Likes
10
Location
Zagreb, Croatia
System Name Valkyrie II
Processor AMD Phenom II X6 1055T
Motherboard Asus M5A97 PRO
Cooling Thermalright Ultra 120 Extreme
Memory 2 * 4GB CMX8GX3M2A2000C9
Video Card(s) nVidia GTX460 768 MB
Storage 1*WD1500HLFS + 1*WD10EARS + 2*WD20EARS RAID1
Display(s) Xerox 24"
Case Cooler Master HAF932
Audio Device(s) Realtek ALC885 8ch
Power Supply Chieftex 650W modular
Software Windows 7 Ultimate x64
#8
Sleeve bearings are easy for maintenance. When you open them, all you have to do is to clean the internals and fill the lubricant chamber with new oil. Ball bearing based are a bit more problematic to repair. You have to open them, clean internals and especially bearings.
In general, the bearings are almost fully closed so dust isn't the problem as much as dry bearings. You have to submerge the entire bearing into oil and move it around violently to force oil to go inside through holes in the bearing housing. Take them out, rotate them a bit and repeat the process few times. Then you have to clean excessive oil from the housing and especially the part where the rotor goes through to prevent "sleeve bearing" effect inside the ball bearing as they are not attached together in a fixed way but the rotor still moves freely inside even if you block the ball bearing rotation. After doing that it's recommended to run such repaired fan for few minutes on lower RPM's (800-1000RPM) to let oil evenly spread inside. Much longer process than for sleeve bearings but from my experience it fixed a 7 years old stock AMD fan nearly perfectly from a noisy bastard to a silent fan again. At a cost of some oil. Not bad eh :) Haven't fixed any rifle bearing or fluid dynamic bearings yet...
You, my good sir, deserve a round of applause!!! :respect::respect::respect:
I will find a way to try this myself, since I have quite a few fans in a closet that could use some maintenance.

Thanks a gazillion! I would put this exact post somewhere as a sticky, if I wuz mod... :ohwell:
 

MxPhenom 216

Corsair Fanboy
Joined
Aug 31, 2010
Messages
12,129 (4.56/day)
Likes
3,697
Location
Seattle, WA
System Name The Battlestation
Processor Intel Core i7 4770k @ 4.2GHZ 1.275v
Motherboard MSi Z97 Gaming 5
Cooling EK Supremacy w/ EK Coolstream PE360
Memory G. Skill Trident X 16Gb (4x4GB) 2400mhz @ 1.65v
Video Card(s) MSi GTX1070 Gaming X 8GB @ 2GHz
Storage Samsung 830 128GB SSD, Crucial MX200 500GB, Seagate Barracuda 2TB (2x 1TB Partitions)
Display(s) Qnix QX2710 27" 2560 x 1440 PLS @ 100hz
Case Phantek Enthoo Evolv ATX TG
Audio Device(s) MSi Gaming AudioBoost ALC1150 w/ Sennheiser Game Ones
Power Supply Seasonic Flagship Prime Platinum 850
Mouse Steelseries Rival 310 w/ QCK Mass mat
Keyboard Corsair K70 w/ MX Browns and Red Backlit
Software Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Benchmark Scores Firestrike: 15439
#9
Sleeve bearings are easy for maintenance. When you open them, all you have to do is to clean the internals and fill the lubricant chamber with new oil. Ball bearing based are a bit more problematic to repair. You have to open them, clean internals and especially bearings.
In general, the bearings are almost fully closed so dust isn't the problem as much as dry bearings. You have to submerge the entire bearing into oil and move it around violently to force oil to go inside through holes in the bearing housing. Take them out, rotate them a bit and repeat the process few times. Then you have to clean excessive oil from the housing and especially the part where the rotor goes through to prevent "sleeve bearing" effect inside the ball bearing as they are not attached together in a fixed way but the rotor still moves freely inside even if you block the ball bearing rotation. After doing that it's recommended to run such repaired fan for few minutes on lower RPM's (800-1000RPM) to let oil evenly spread inside. Much longer process than for sleeve bearings but from my experience it fixed a 7 years old stock AMD fan nearly perfectly from a noisy bastard to a silent fan again. At a cost of some oil. Not bad eh :) Haven't fixed any rifle bearing or fluid dynamic bearings yet...
sleeve bearings still arent as good as ball bearing fans. most sleeve bearing fans are built poorly and perform pretty mediocre. Also when undervolting comes into play with fans most sleeve bearing fans will start to click(Ultra Kazes) unlike ball bearings which get really quiet even if they were already pretty quiet before
 
Joined
Oct 2, 2004
Messages
12,351 (2.56/day)
Likes
5,809
Location
Europe\Slovenia
System Name Dark Silence 2
Processor Intel Core i7 5820K @ 4.5 GHz (1.15V)
Motherboard MSI X99A Gaming 7
Cooling Cooler Master Nepton 120XL
Memory 32 GB DDR4 Kingston HyperX Fury 2400 MHz @ 2666 MHz 15-15-15-32 1T (1.25V)
Video Card(s) AORUS GeForce GTX 1080Ti 11GB (1950/11000 OC Mode)
Storage Samsung 850 Pro 2TB SSD (3D V-NAND)
Display(s) ASUS VG248QE 144Hz 1ms (DisplayPort)
Case Corsair Carbide 330R Titanium
Audio Device(s) Creative Sound BlasterX AE-5 + Altec Lansing MX5021 (HiFi capacitors and OPAMP upgrade)
Power Supply BeQuiet! Dark Power Pro 11 750W
Mouse Logitech G502 Proteus Spectrum
Keyboard Cherry Stream XT Black
Software Windows 10 Pro 64-bit (Fall Creators Update)
#10
I'll probably write about fan repairing on my blog soon. Sleeve bearing and ball bearing types for now.

@nvidiaintelftw
It all depends. I've seen dead silent sleeve bearing fans and ball bearing fans that were making awful grinding noise (new of course, not used). I've also had one Xigmatek fan with rifle bearings that was grinding like a mill.
But i've also had dead silent ball bearings and noisy sleeves. It's all down to design and overall quality. But as i said, sleeve bearings are the easiest to maintain. There is just one important thing about almost all types of bearings. You can use them for 10 years easily if you maintain them before they go noisy (lets say every 2 years). If you leave sleeve bearing chamber dry for too long you'll wear the rotor space and it won't run as smooth anymore even if you fix it later. It will be light years better but not perfect. Similar problem is with ball bearings. The balls will wear out if they run dry inside the bearing rings. The problem is that most ppl just run them forever. I've got several systems that were ridiculously noisy, but that did not bother their users.
But they were all surprised how silent systems were when they got them back from me.
 
Joined
Jan 31, 2010
Messages
2,450 (0.85/day)
Likes
769
System Name Xtreme PC's AMDx8
Processor AMD FX8320 @ 4.0GHz NB/HT @ 2.6GHz
Motherboard Asus Crosshair V Formula
Cooling ThermoLab Baram 2x 120mm Gentle Typhoons 1850rpm
Memory 8GB (2x4GB) Mushkin Blackline DDR3 2400MHz 11/13/13/34/1T 1.65V
Video Card(s) Sapphire Nitro+ RX580 8GB OC 1342/2000 (Core/Mem) BIOS Modded
Storage 2x Kingston V300 120GB SSD's Raid0: 1x Sandisk 128GB SSD 1xWD 2TB red, 1xWD 1TB black 1xWD 2TB nas
Display(s) ViewSonic VX2457 75Hz FreeSync 1920x1080p
Case SilverStone Raven RV02B-W + 3x SS AP181 + USB3.0 upgrade
Audio Device(s) Creative SB X-Fi Xtreme PCIe + Pioneer VSX-D457 amp Technics Speaker set
Power Supply SilverStone ST75F-P Modular 750W
Mouse Logitech G402 Hyperion Fury
Keyboard Logitech G105
Software Windows 10 X64 PRO (build 1607)
Benchmark Scores it sucks even less much now ;)
#11
Given a choice I'd take a mag lev fan anyday
 
Joined
Nov 13, 2007
Messages
6,139 (1.67/day)
Likes
1,634
Location
Austin Texas
System Name silen8
Processor Intel i7 7820X Delidded @ 4.64Ghz / 3.1Ghz Mesh
Motherboard MSI X299 Tomahawk
Cooling 240mm Corsair H105 Intake
Memory 32 GB Quad 3434Mhz DDR4 15-16-16-38-300-1T
Video Card(s) Gigabyte GTX 1080 Ti Gaming
Storage 1Tb Samsung 960 Pro m2, 1TB Samsung 850 Pro SSD
Display(s) Dell 24" 2560x1440 144hz, G-Sync @ 165Hz
Case NZXT S340 Elite Black
Audio Device(s) Arctis 7
Power Supply FSP HydroG 750W
Mouse zowie ec-2
Keyboard corsair k65 tenkeyless
Software Windows 10 64 Bit
Benchmark Scores Cb: 2103 Multi, 209 Single, 10450 Timespy - 10150 GPU/11900 CPU, superpi 1M - 7.71s
#12
I'll probably write about fan repairing on my blog soon. Sleeve bearing and ball bearing types for now.

@nvidiaintelftw
It all depends. I've seen dead silent sleeve bearing fans and ball bearing fans that were making awful grinding noise (new of course, not used). I've also had one Xigmatek fan with rifle bearings that was grinding like a mill.
But i've also had dead silent ball bearings and noisy sleeves. It's all down to design and overall quality. But as i said, sleeve bearings are the easiest to maintain. There is just one important thing about almost all types of bearings. You can use them for 10 years easily if you maintain them before they go noisy (lets say every 2 years). If you leave sleeve bearing chamber dry for too long you'll wear the rotor space and it won't run as smooth anymore even if you fix it later. It will be light years better but not perfect. Similar problem is with ball bearings. The balls will wear out if they run dry inside the bearing rings. The problem is that most ppl just run them forever. I've got several systems that were ridiculously noisy, but that did not bother their users.
But they were all surprised how silent systems were when they got them back from me.

Im surprised that you would go through all of that effort and setup to repair the bearings. I mean most fans cost around $10 and last a few years. I just throw them away and get brand new fans than bother to fix them.
 
Joined
Nov 8, 2008
Messages
626 (0.19/day)
Likes
88
Location
Finland (northern)
System Name Getting old!
Processor AMD Phenom II X4 965 @ 3,9Ghz
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-MA790GP-UD4H
Cooling About sufficient air cooling
Memory 4GB Dominator DDR2 1066 @1040Mhz
Video Card(s) Club 3D Radeon HD6950 1GB
Storage 120GB Kingston SSDNow 200V+, 1TB Samsung Spinpoint F3
Display(s) Crossover 27Q LED-P (lovely!)
Case Antec Three Hundred
Audio Device(s) Integrated -> optical -> HELIX P DSP
Power Supply Corsair HX620W
Software Win7 64-bit
Benchmark Scores 3DMark11 P5285 WPrime 1.55 10,15 sec Super Pi Mod 1.5 17,920 sec
#13
^ I think its a shame that so many people nowadays tend to just go for a new one because "its not worth the effort" or "a new one cost only xx dollars". This is with almost any consumables. I almost always try to fix things before going for a new one. Maybe I cant fix it, but at least I get a better idea of how the thing works, when disassembling it.
 
Joined
Jan 31, 2010
Messages
2,450 (0.85/day)
Likes
769
System Name Xtreme PC's AMDx8
Processor AMD FX8320 @ 4.0GHz NB/HT @ 2.6GHz
Motherboard Asus Crosshair V Formula
Cooling ThermoLab Baram 2x 120mm Gentle Typhoons 1850rpm
Memory 8GB (2x4GB) Mushkin Blackline DDR3 2400MHz 11/13/13/34/1T 1.65V
Video Card(s) Sapphire Nitro+ RX580 8GB OC 1342/2000 (Core/Mem) BIOS Modded
Storage 2x Kingston V300 120GB SSD's Raid0: 1x Sandisk 128GB SSD 1xWD 2TB red, 1xWD 1TB black 1xWD 2TB nas
Display(s) ViewSonic VX2457 75Hz FreeSync 1920x1080p
Case SilverStone Raven RV02B-W + 3x SS AP181 + USB3.0 upgrade
Audio Device(s) Creative SB X-Fi Xtreme PCIe + Pioneer VSX-D457 amp Technics Speaker set
Power Supply SilverStone ST75F-P Modular 750W
Mouse Logitech G402 Hyperion Fury
Keyboard Logitech G105
Software Windows 10 X64 PRO (build 1607)
Benchmark Scores it sucks even less much now ;)
#14
^ I think its a shame that so many people nowadays tend to just go for a new one because "its not worth the effort" or "a new one cost only xx dollars". This is with almost any consumables. I almost always try to fix things before going for a new one. Maybe I cant fix it, but at least I get a better idea of how the thing works, when disassembling it.
call me a stooge but I do the same thing fix before buying new or recycle case in point the fan on my HD5770 went south the other day and well I did try to pull it apart but it fell apart fins broke off the base snapped in two it was a total nightmare:eek:. So a quick rummage through the stockpile finds me a nice low current draw PSU fan and a bit of Ghetto modding:pimp: and wayhey it works better than the original ;)
 
Joined
Nov 13, 2007
Messages
6,139 (1.67/day)
Likes
1,634
Location
Austin Texas
System Name silen8
Processor Intel i7 7820X Delidded @ 4.64Ghz / 3.1Ghz Mesh
Motherboard MSI X299 Tomahawk
Cooling 240mm Corsair H105 Intake
Memory 32 GB Quad 3434Mhz DDR4 15-16-16-38-300-1T
Video Card(s) Gigabyte GTX 1080 Ti Gaming
Storage 1Tb Samsung 960 Pro m2, 1TB Samsung 850 Pro SSD
Display(s) Dell 24" 2560x1440 144hz, G-Sync @ 165Hz
Case NZXT S340 Elite Black
Audio Device(s) Arctis 7
Power Supply FSP HydroG 750W
Mouse zowie ec-2
Keyboard corsair k65 tenkeyless
Software Windows 10 64 Bit
Benchmark Scores Cb: 2103 Multi, 209 Single, 10450 Timespy - 10150 GPU/11900 CPU, superpi 1M - 7.71s
#15
^ I think its a shame that so many people nowadays tend to just go for a new one because "its not worth the effort" or "a new one cost only xx dollars". This is with almost any consumables. I almost always try to fix things before going for a new one. Maybe I cant fix it, but at least I get a better idea of how the thing works, when disassembling it.
But ask WHY is it not worth the effort? It is a calculation of what is my time is worth: What else do i need to buy to fix it? Is an hour or more of your time (including the time to go and BUY the necessary tools) and the money to buy the grease and w/e other tools you might need worth it?

Are you going to fix EVERY little consumer good that breaks on you and is easily replaced?

I dig the whole "Im not lazy or wasteful" attitude, but when are you gonna spend time with your gf/wife/kids/friends/doing something that makes more money or makes you happier?

I mean, honestly... if you have time to be fixing $10 fans for the sake of frugality, you have some serious time on your hands.
 
Joined
Jan 31, 2010
Messages
2,450 (0.85/day)
Likes
769
System Name Xtreme PC's AMDx8
Processor AMD FX8320 @ 4.0GHz NB/HT @ 2.6GHz
Motherboard Asus Crosshair V Formula
Cooling ThermoLab Baram 2x 120mm Gentle Typhoons 1850rpm
Memory 8GB (2x4GB) Mushkin Blackline DDR3 2400MHz 11/13/13/34/1T 1.65V
Video Card(s) Sapphire Nitro+ RX580 8GB OC 1342/2000 (Core/Mem) BIOS Modded
Storage 2x Kingston V300 120GB SSD's Raid0: 1x Sandisk 128GB SSD 1xWD 2TB red, 1xWD 1TB black 1xWD 2TB nas
Display(s) ViewSonic VX2457 75Hz FreeSync 1920x1080p
Case SilverStone Raven RV02B-W + 3x SS AP181 + USB3.0 upgrade
Audio Device(s) Creative SB X-Fi Xtreme PCIe + Pioneer VSX-D457 amp Technics Speaker set
Power Supply SilverStone ST75F-P Modular 750W
Mouse Logitech G402 Hyperion Fury
Keyboard Logitech G105
Software Windows 10 X64 PRO (build 1607)
Benchmark Scores it sucks even less much now ;)
#16
the above took me approximately 10mins to do all the while my sons sitting right next to me asking questions I figure if he wants to know then who am i to stop him learning he an me enjoy it and he learns that not everything needs to thrown out
 
Joined
Nov 13, 2007
Messages
6,139 (1.67/day)
Likes
1,634
Location
Austin Texas
System Name silen8
Processor Intel i7 7820X Delidded @ 4.64Ghz / 3.1Ghz Mesh
Motherboard MSI X299 Tomahawk
Cooling 240mm Corsair H105 Intake
Memory 32 GB Quad 3434Mhz DDR4 15-16-16-38-300-1T
Video Card(s) Gigabyte GTX 1080 Ti Gaming
Storage 1Tb Samsung 960 Pro m2, 1TB Samsung 850 Pro SSD
Display(s) Dell 24" 2560x1440 144hz, G-Sync @ 165Hz
Case NZXT S340 Elite Black
Audio Device(s) Arctis 7
Power Supply FSP HydroG 750W
Mouse zowie ec-2
Keyboard corsair k65 tenkeyless
Software Windows 10 64 Bit
Benchmark Scores Cb: 2103 Multi, 209 Single, 10450 Timespy - 10150 GPU/11900 CPU, superpi 1M - 7.71s
#17
the above took me approximately 10mins to do all the while my sons sitting right next to me asking questions I figure if he wants to know then who am i to stop him learning he an me enjoy it and he learns that not everything needs to thrown out
You took a working fan that you had in a box and strapped it to a 5770 to replace a broken fan. You didnt try to re-glue the 5770 fan and fix the bearing and re-solder whatever made it go south after it fell apart and your initial try failed. So if anything you threw away a broken fan and replaced it with another one.

I dont see how that's not the same as throwing away a broken part and replacing it with a good part.
 
Joined
Jan 31, 2010
Messages
2,450 (0.85/day)
Likes
769
System Name Xtreme PC's AMDx8
Processor AMD FX8320 @ 4.0GHz NB/HT @ 2.6GHz
Motherboard Asus Crosshair V Formula
Cooling ThermoLab Baram 2x 120mm Gentle Typhoons 1850rpm
Memory 8GB (2x4GB) Mushkin Blackline DDR3 2400MHz 11/13/13/34/1T 1.65V
Video Card(s) Sapphire Nitro+ RX580 8GB OC 1342/2000 (Core/Mem) BIOS Modded
Storage 2x Kingston V300 120GB SSD's Raid0: 1x Sandisk 128GB SSD 1xWD 2TB red, 1xWD 1TB black 1xWD 2TB nas
Display(s) ViewSonic VX2457 75Hz FreeSync 1920x1080p
Case SilverStone Raven RV02B-W + 3x SS AP181 + USB3.0 upgrade
Audio Device(s) Creative SB X-Fi Xtreme PCIe + Pioneer VSX-D457 amp Technics Speaker set
Power Supply SilverStone ST75F-P Modular 750W
Mouse Logitech G402 Hyperion Fury
Keyboard Logitech G105
Software Windows 10 X64 PRO (build 1607)
Benchmark Scores it sucks even less much now ;)
#18
actually I had to de-solder the broken fans wires and resolder them to the other fan as the other fans wires were to short to reach, so yes i did do a bit of work to get it running it wasn't just a straight swap