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The "2.19TB" hard drive limit

Discussion in 'Storage' started by qubit, Dec 2, 2010.

  1. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    I thought this article from ExtremeTech quite interesting, even though I take issue with the author's "2.19TB" limit. It sounds like he's being naughty and using decimal to measure capacity, just like the HD makers.

    He states that 512 bytes x 2^32 = 2,199,023,255,552 or 2.19TB. Actually, this is exactly 2TB.

    Finally, did you know that the 4KB block addressing that completely solves this problem has been around since way back in the 90s? Me neither. Apparently, Windows XP and the manufacturers have held this improvement back for more than a decade.

    ExtremelyTech
     
  2. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    the 2TB limit (or 2.19TB in HDD manufacturer terms) is well known.

    windows 7 can use 2TB+ drives, but they arent bootable. To make them bootable we need to get off BIOS and onto EFI - and that aint happening very fast.
     
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  3. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    +1 Mussels

    Everything you've said and more is in the article, which is why I thought it interesting.
     
  4. Red_Machine

    Red_Machine

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    They're just scaremongering for the most part. Especially with the comment:

    "And what happens when a huge HD crashes?

    It will, you know."

    Bullshit. Not if you look after it like you're supposed to.
     
  5. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    Well, you will lose the data on a hard disc eventually, when it dies. That is a fact. Because of this and many other sources of data loss, one should always have at least two copies of their data.

    Computer illiterate users have a habit of storing their life's work on just the one HD, with the inevitable consequence. So, to drum it into their heads, I always tell them that one copy is data that they haven't lost yet. This statement is absolutely true and it usually scares them enough to listen to what I have to say about backups.

    I myself keep three copies of my data. I have one main drive and back it up to two others every night. The drives are in different computers too, for good measure.
     
  6. freaksavior

    freaksavior To infinity ... and beyond!

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    Happened to my girlfriend. She had malware which totally prevented windows from even booting.

    I laughed at her, I know it was mean but she deserved it after I told her countless times.
     
  7. Thrackan

    Thrackan

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    She is now your ex?
     
    freaksavior, PhysXerror and digibucc say thanks.
  8. Nailezs

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    :roll:

    seriously though, i am eager for motherboard manufactorers and chip makers to mmake the move to EFI. we embrace most other kind sof new tech, why is this tech taking so long?
     
  9. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    Yeah, I'd be feeling smug too and have a chuckle, but would likely keep that bit to myself if I wanted to get laid that night. ;)

    In fact, such events are a perfect time to offer professional-grade sympathy and explain the most suitable backup strategies available to them from now on. I'd try to recover the data too, if possible.
     
  10. dr emulator (madmax)

    dr emulator (madmax)

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    best thing is if you don't want data loss is to avoid pata harddrive caddies, as the pins get dirty and then you get errors and data corruption

    how do i know ?

    well i have 4 of the damned things and yes i have lost a whole drives worth of data :cry:
    so it's something to think about ;)
     
  11. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    Oh god yes. :eek: Years ago, I had Syquest SparQ 1GB internal and external hard drives with removable discs and the reliability was absolute crap, the internal version especially. :shadedshu

    I actually have to confess that I still have the damn things, but don't use them, of course. The internal drive completely gave up the ghost and won't even be recognized by the BIOS any more.

    And finally, I've got one of the removable media, unused and still in its plastic sealed wrapper. :D
     
  12. InnocentCriminal

    InnocentCriminal Resident Grammar Amender

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    No digital data is truly safe, doesn't matter where you store it. Saying that, I'm running out of HDD space and need another HDD. I hate being poor.

    :(
     
    10 Year Member at TPU
  13. dr emulator (madmax)

    dr emulator (madmax)

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    back on topic :p,

    i remember trying to use a 500gb then a 640gb harddrive in my old pc, only to realise that they weren't been seen by the bios, iirc it was something to do with the sata 1 chipset (a via 8237)

    weird thing was the pc would act like it saw the drives (windows bar would stop for a second then continue at boot), but just couldn't see them
     
  14. Marineborn

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    what happens when my harddrives crashes, i grab one of my other 19 harddrives put the bad one as a slave and boot and collect my data...whooo thats hard, lol, thats some stupid scaretactic crap
     
  15. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    If your hard drive crashes then it can't read any data, because it's f*cked. How will connecting it as a slave help you?

    The best way to avoid this remains to have a minimum of two copies of your data, or your will lose it.
     
  16. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    i believe he thinks a corrupted OS is the same as a hard drive crash. its clearly not.
     
    qubit says thanks.
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  17. Marineborn

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    im talking about crashing like, blue screen, os corruptions, not a pickaxe threw the hardrive, lol
     
  18. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    that is not a hard drive crash. thats just data corruption (from a virus, bad OC, whatever) - nothing do with the drive failing itself.


    when a drive fails you know it - all your datas fucked.
     
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  19. Marineborn

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    ive had it happen, but the way they talk about it is like it happens all the time, i have harddrifves from 10 yrs ago that are still functioning. thats complete crap, as long as your not playing hackey sack with them and not letting them overheat for the most part thell last a long time, unless they were factory built with a default
     
  20. WhiteLotus

    WhiteLotus

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    eBuyer constantly do deals on harddrives. Today the 2TB western digital is just over £70
     
  21. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    it doesnt happen often at all. the problem is that when it does, it hurts. i've had no drive failures in years, except for three WD 640GBs that all died within 48 hours of owning them (bad batch?). that sucked, since the first two had over 700GB of my data on them - no backups, made the stupid mistake of selling the old drives immediately.
     
    10 Year Member at TPU
  22. Marineborn

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    yeah that does suck, too be honest, i usually let a 1 week test for most my harddrives before i start pumping them full of data i learned from a bad exsperience in the past, was shitty
     
  23. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    @Marineborn: ok, I accept you meant a borked OS. :) It's still naughty to call it a "hard drive crash" though, because it isn't and is misleading. And yes, you can often recover files off it... but then again, an OS should always be in its own partition and all data in one or more others (and preferably on a separate HD) not in your profile buried in the OS. Then, if the OS goes south (north for Australians, of course) you're not sitting there sweating and stressed out trying to retrieve your data.

    Data loss can occur in lots of ways other than a hard disc dying, so the possibilities should be covered.

    There's this example of simple human error, if someone's not alert: our sleepy user deletes a folder chock full of data - many gigs of it. They then empty the Recycle Bin to recover the space and immediately realize they meant to delete the folder next to it instead.

    Oops. :eek:

    This happens quite often and I've fallen for it myself. You are now left with the option of attempting to use disc recovery tools or effortlessly restoring your data from your up to date backup. I know which option I'd prefer. ;)
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2010
  24. xbonez New Member

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    For the price that HDDs sell at, it shouldn't be expensive for anyone who would realky be hurt by data loss to set up a RAID 1 array.
    Personally, all my documents, pics etc are in my dropbox (so i have a constant back up online, and on my laptop where I have my dropbox attached). My HDD contains movies, games etc. which I don't really care if I lose. Hence, I use a RAID 0 array.
     
  25. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    That sounds like a decent strategy xbonez. :)
     

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