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The benefits of having only your OS on one drive/partition?

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by BloodTotal, Jan 5, 2009.

  1. BloodTotal

    BloodTotal

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    This question has baffled me for some time now: Would having only your OS on one drive/partition eliminate any kind of bottleneck or etc. Im not exactly sure what it would do. Would any one care to elaborate

    What would be the negative impact of having all your things on drive C:\?
     
  2. [I.R.A]_FBi

    [I.R.A]_FBi

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    well if ur os alone is on one partition you could have a next clone/backup partition to restor back to frsh in no time
     
  3. oli_ramsay

    oli_ramsay

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    I was under the impression that having it on a small partition would reduce access times, plus you get the benefit of backing it up onto the other partition.
     
  4. ZenZimZaliben

    ZenZimZaliben

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    It's a minimal impact on performance, slightly faster, and defrags go much faster and need to be done less often. I have all my main programs and OS installed on my raptors, everything else, media/data is on the other array. I then make a ghost image of my OS raid so if it gets corrupted its a very easy reinstall. My data array is RAID 1. But the OS array is RAID 0 for speed and if it gets corrupted the RAID is toast, but a simple Ghosting and its back up to the last time I backed it up.
     
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  5. AsRock

    AsRock TPU addict

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    Saves me much time due to reinstalling a OS and installing some games and Apps.

    Not all games\apps require to be reinstalled even more so with digitaly downloaded ones.

    In fact GTA 4 if you reinstall over were the files are the insaller will skip the files and just add whats needed to play the game.

    When a OS cannot be fixed or proves to time consuming formating it on a smaller partition is faster then a larger partition.

    All so it allows me to dual boot.
     
  6. farlex85

    farlex85 New Member

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    Yeah I couldn't say for sure, but it would seem to follow that if you had just a small section dedicated to os tasks, those tasks wouldn't be slowed down by the need to look through all the other stuff on the drive, thus lowering access times as oli said. And of course back-up/re-format purposes are easier.
     
  7. AsRock

    AsRock TPU addict

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    The difference i have noticed in a partitioned HDD is next to none and just serves convenience.
     
  8. BloodTotal

    BloodTotal

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    let me clear one thing up, so you would be installing all programs and games on that "OS" drive, or would you be installing games and software on other drives?
     
  9. ZenZimZaliben

    ZenZimZaliben

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    I would install all important applications/os/games you use often on the smaller partition or the faster raid array. Apps used less often, data, media, on the bigger partition/raid.
     
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  10. DRDNA

    DRDNA

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    I agree with AsRock on this one !
     
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  11. BloodTotal

    BloodTotal

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    it would be interesting to know how much speed you would gain theoretically. I'm going to try to find out.
     
  12. erocker

    erocker Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Speed gain is minimal, it depends on the applications, multi tasking etc.. I use a 32gb SSD for my O/S, a 150gb raptor for my games, and a 500GB WD for storage. It indeed makes defragging easier, especially since I don't really need to defrag my storage drive. It's also just easier for organization. As Asrock said, it's mainly for convinience.
     
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  13. r9

    r9

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    I see you have experience with raid. I would like to ask you is it noticeable performance increase Single HDD vs RAID 0 2x drives ? I`m talking about 7200 rpm drives.
     
  14. Darknova

    Darknova

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    I use a separate HDD for my OS purely to keep my data away from the drive. That way if I have format/reinstall I don't lose anything expect maybe some save data and a few settings, which is nothing important.

    Plus by using a separate HDD you can place the pagefile/temp files on your secondary HDD and get a bit more performance :)
     
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  15. DarkMatter New Member

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    Having your OS in a different HDD definately makes it faster from my experience, although maybe most of that performance gain comes from the fact that I also alwys create a 4-8 GB partition in the another HDD(s) just to contain the paging file. I don't know.

    Obviously a separate HDD >> a separate partition, but both are beneficial against a single partition. Technically a different partition has close to no performance benefit, but in practice I have found it does, mostly due to fragmentation. If you don't like defraging too often it does make a BIG difference IMO and even if you do, defraging that partition is much faster, so it encourages you to defrag more often. All benefits.

    @r9

    Off course it does make a difference. But mostly only for big transfers, both in MBs and the size of the files being moved. Anyway, although I have a slow internet conection I'm always the first to enter after map changes in almost every online game, if that serves you.
     
  16. BrooksyX

    BrooksyX

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    I definitely agree that it is more for convenience than speed.

    I have my 700gb raid setup split into 2 partitions. 200gb for windows and games. Then 500 for everything else. I reinstall windows a lot so its no problem cleaning my 200gb partition while keeping my 500gb intact. Makes everything nice and easy.
     
  17. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

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    I've always used one partition per hard drive or RAID level. Partitioning hard drives, to me, is just putting like road blocks in the way--something to annoy me later on for no real reason. That's why I don't do it.

    Although I do recommend two separate physical volumes (not partitions on a single hard drive): one for applications, operating system, and temporary user data; one for permanent user data that needs to carry over when the other volume gets erased (documents, music, drivers, etc.).


    I frequently get 200+ GB of data on my HDDs at some 97% fragmentation. There is no performance difference before/after it is defragmented. I noticed hard drive performance tends to slow down the most once they exceed 50% full. My guess is because that data is sitting on the inner edge of the drive so the drive has to physically spin farther to read the same amount of data.


    Page file is used for two different reasons: 1) ran out of physical memory or 2) applications will use it to store information that needs to be accessed frequently but speed is not crucial. In the case of 1, you need more memory. Things that should be moving at 3000+ MB/s are now down to 60 MB/s. The performance differential is obvious--like night and day. In the case of 2, placing the page file on something faster will improve application performance; however, applications that intentionally use page file are rather rare and typically professional (like Photoshop). So, for instance, if you use Photoshop a lot, it may prove very beneficial to get a SSD that is strictly used for your page file. In most circumstances though, it isn't worth the money.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2009
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  18. BloodTotal

    BloodTotal

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    hmm looks like ssd drives have write limits

    taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solid-state_drive

    Limited write (erase) cycles: Flash-memory cells will often wear out after 1,000 to 10,000 write cycles for MLC, and up to 100,000 write cycles for SLC[9], while high endurance cells may have an endurance of 1–5 million write cycles (many log files, file allocation tables, and other commonly used parts of the file system exceed this over the lifetime of a computer).[24] Special file systems or firmware designs can mitigate this problem by spreading writes over the entire device (so-called wear levelling), rather than rewriting files in place.[25] In 2008 wear levelling was just beginning to be incorporated into consumer level devices.[9] However, effective write cycles can be much less, because when a write request is made to a particular memory block, all data in the block is overwritten even when only part of the memory is altered. The write amplification, as referred by Intel, can be reduced using write memory buffer.[26] In combination with wear leveling, over-provisioning SSD flash drives with spared memory capacity also delays the loss of user-accessible memory capacity. NAND memory can be negatively impacted by read and program (write) disturbs arising from over accessing a particular NAND location. This overuse of NAND locations causes bits within the NAND block to erroneously change values. Wear leveling, by redirecting SSD writes to lesser-used NAND locations, thus reduces the potential for program or write disturbs.[27] An example for the lifetime of SSD is explained in detail in this wiki.[dubious – discuss] SSDs based on DRAM, however, do not suffer from this problem.
     
  19. BloodTotal

    BloodTotal

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    Would it be better to store your games on another partition/drive?
     
  20. AsRock

    AsRock TPU addict

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    Think this says it all for me lol. And i'm using Raid 5 with 6 HDD's.

    If i was not raiding them all i would have the OS and apps on there own drive(s) and my games on another.


    Yes there is, when i was building mine i found the 3RD HDD i added had the least boost to the array all though i only use raid 5 as Raid 0 to me is just asking for problems. But yes you would get a boost. Were i see mine mainly is game loading times.
     

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  21. DrPepper

    DrPepper The Doctor is in the house

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    What I did with my two HDD is install winxp on my second HDD and install all my games on that. Then I used my main HDD for my main OS and linked the games .exe's to the main HDD using shortcuts so that if I had to reformat it was easier. It also improved loading times.
     
  22. Kursah

    Kursah

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    Personally I like having either a system drive or system partition. Reason being is then many of my programs, all of my games, all of my music and movie backups, etc are on the secondary drive/partition. When I reinstall an OS I always format the drive...some people don't and that's fine, I prefer to start fresh with an OS install. There's no performance gain or anything like that I'm sure, but for me knowing that when I format the C: partition, everything on D that I have saved, backed up, installed, etc is still there...fortunately many games continue to work through many OS installs, a few need reinstalled, and even quite a few programs continue to work just fine too..so for me it's a plus.

    :toast:
     
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  23. Stearic New Member

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    partitioning

    I used to be a partition junkie for a while, but then, I came to my senses:D

    Currently, on my main XP Pro SP3 system, I have 4 drives, and I keep the OS+program files on the 640GB drive. One 500GB drive is for videos, music, downloads etc. Another 500GB drive is general stuff including torrents-in-progress. The last 500GB drive is my dslr photos drive and image archive; this one has a 10GB partition exclusively for the paging file. Drive #2 and#3 are also photoshop CS3 scratch drives.

    Performance is fine, and I've more or less isolated the functions of the system as far as the drives are concerned i.e. I can simultaneously launch files from each drive without a delay, the same drive arm doesnt have to access the pagefile while it's launching an application etc. etc.

    Defragging is not a problem at all since I am running Diskeeper 2009 pro which defrags all the drives automatically in the background. Never need to bother with defrag times or manual defrags, diskeeper does it all on it's own.

    From a performance POV, having multiple partitions on one physical drive is not useful. It's advisable to segregate the data according to type, usage etc on different physical drives for both safety as well as performance reasons.

    I also have a 'few' :D other 160GB and 250GB drives with archived files, that see rotation in the system according to files I want to access. Clean install of the OS + MS Office + updates has been cloned to one of these drives for emergency recovery if necessary.
     

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