• Welcome to TechPowerUp Forums, Guest! Please check out our forum guidelines for info related to our community.

The Saga Of 'Star Citizen,' A Video Game That Raised $300 Million—But May Never Be Ready To Play

Joined
Apr 12, 2013
Messages
2,505 (1.09/day)
Surprised this didn't make it to TPU front page :wtf:
t’s October 2018 and 2,000 video game fanatics are jammed into Austin’s Long Center for the Performing Arts to get a glimpse of Star Citizen, the sprawling online multiplayer game being made by legendary designer Chris Roberts. Most of the people here helped to pay for the game’s development—on average, $200 each, although some backers have given thousands. An epic sci-fi fantasy, Star Citizen was supposed to be finished in 2014. But after seven years of work, no one—least of all Roberts—has a clue as to when it will be done. But despite the disappointments and delays, this crowd is cheering for Roberts. They roar as the 50-year-old Englishman jumps onto the stage and a big screen lights up with the latest test version of Star Citizen.

The demo starts small: Seeing through the eyes of the in-game character, the player wakes up in his living quarters, gets up and brews a cup of coffee. Applause quickly turns to laughter when the game promptly crashes. While his underlings scramble to get the demo running again, a practiced Roberts smoothly fills minutes of dead air by screening a commercial for the Kraken, a massive war machine spaceship. Eventually the Kraken, like all the starships that Roberts sells, will be playable in Star Citizen. At least that’s the hope. But for $1,650 it could be yours, right away.

“Some days, I wish I could be like . . . ‘You’re not going to see anything until it’s beautiful,’ ” Roberts later says at his Los Angeles studio. “A lot of times we’ll show stuff and literally say, ‘Now, this is rough.’ ”
What’s really rough is the current state of Star Citizen. The company Roberts cofounded, Cloud Imperium Games, has raised $288 million to bring the PC game to life along with its companion, an offline single-player action game called Squadron 42. Of this haul, $242 million has been contributed by about 1.1 million fans, who have either bought digital toys like the Kraken or given cash online. Excluding cryptocurrencies, that makes Star Citizen far and away the biggest crowdfunded project ever.


Chris Roberts, founder of Cloud Imperium Games.
ETHAN PINES FOR FORBES

Rough playable modes—alphas, not betas—are used to raise hopes and illustrate work being done. And Roberts has enticed gamers with a steady stream of hype, including promising a vast, playable universe with “100 star systems.” But most of the money is gone, and the game is still far from finished. At the end of 2017, for example, Roberts was down to just $14 million in the bank. He has since raised more money. Those 100 star systems? He has not completed a single one. So far he has two mostly finished planets, nine moons and an asteroid.

This is not fraud—Roberts really is working on a game—but it is incompetence and mismanagement on a galactic scale. The heedless waste is fueled by easy money raised through crowdfunding, a Wild West territory nearly free of regulators and rules. Creatives are in charge here, not profit-driven bean counters or deadline-enforcing suits. Federal bureaucrats and state lawyers have intervened only in a few egregious situations where there was little effort to make good and a lot of the money was pocketed by the promoters. Many high-profile crowdfunded projects, like the Pebble smartwatch ($43.4 million raised) and the Ouya video game console ($8.6 million), have failed miserably.

If you don’t play video games, you probably have never heard of Roberts. But in the world of consoles and controllers, he is Keith Richards: an aging rock star who can still get fans to reach into their pockets. Roberts first gained fame with his early 1990s hit Wing Commander, a space combat series that grossed over $400 million and featured Hollywood stars like Mark Hamill and Malcolm McDowell. He followed that success by starting his own studio, Digital Anvil, with Microsoft as an investor. There, he spent years working on Freelancer, a spiritual successor to Wing Commander, which was eventually released years behind schedule and was far from a blockbuster. Roberts also dabbled in Hollywood, spending tens of millions on a movie version of Wing Commander that he directed himself and that was a critical and commercial flop.

Forbes spoke to 20 people who used to work for Cloud Imperium, many of whom depict Roberts as a micromanager and poor steward of resources. They describe the work environment as chaotic.



Release The Kraken: With a wink to the 1981 movie "The Clash of The Titans," The Kraken is a Star Citizen “concept” ship that Cloud Imperium sold for $1,650 each last year.
“As the money rolled in, what I consider to be some of [Roberts’] old bad habits popped up—not being super-focused,” says Mark Day, a producer on Wing Commander IV who runs a company that was contracted to do work on Star Citizen in 2013 and 2014. “It had got out of hand, in my opinion. The promises being made—call it feature creep, call it whatever it is—now we can do this, now we can do that. I was shocked.”
“There is a plan. Don’t worry—it’s not complete madness,” Roberts insists.

But what Roberts has stirred up does seem crazy. Star Citizen seems destined to be the most expensive video game ever made—and it might never be finished. To keep funding it and the 537 employees Cloud Imperium has working in five offices around the world, Roberts constantly needs to raise more money because he is constantly burning through cash.
This is not fraud—Roberts really is working on a game—but it is incompetence and mismanagement on a galactic scale.​
Up to a point, Roberts has been transparent about where the money has been going. He released years’ worth of financial statements last December. But he won’t say how much he or other top Cloud Imperium execs have made from the project. His wife and his brother both work in senior positions at the company.

“There’s no two ways about it, man. Star Citizen is nuts,” says Jesse Schell, a prominent game developer and professor at Carnegie Mellon University. “This thing is unusual in about five dimensions. . . . It is very rare to be doing game development for seven years—that’s not how it works. That’s not normal at all.”

In the fall of 2012, Chris Roberts stepped onto the stage of a different Austin auditorium and proclaimed, “I’m coming back.” With a sleek video showing flying spaceships and a short demo he played from the podium, Roberts announced his first crowdfunding campaign, which quickly raised $6.2 million. It doesn’t seem like a lot in a world where budgets for quality games can easily reach into the tens of millions, but Roberts left the impression that it would be enough. After all, Star Citizen was already “12 months into production.” It seemed like a redemption song from a man who had been out of gaming for a decade after his partnership with Microsoft had gone sour. (Today, Roberts says that initial year of development doesn’t count because “it was more proof-of-concept work.”)
Growing up in Manchester, England, Roberts was a skilled coder with grand ambitions. He made games in his teens, including a soccer simulation for the BBC Micro, before landing in Austin in 1987. There, he met influential video game director Richard Garriott—famous to fans of the blockbuster Ultima series as Lord British—and at age 19 started working for Garriott’s Origin Systems, where Roberts created Wing Commander. The PC game launched in 1990 and was wildly successful.
Free of Microsoft, Roberts went fully Hollywood, making a string of forgettable movies, like "The Big White" (2005) and "Outlander" (2008).​
In 1996, Roberts left Origin and cofounded Digital Anvil to create games in partnership with Microsoft, which was beginning to take gaming seriously and had a minority stake. Following the success of Wing Commander, Roberts authored another game at Origin, Strike Commander, known for its production headaches, and developed a reputation as an exacting boss. But he was still seen as gaming’s golden boy.

Roberts expanded on the idea of a living, breathing universe when he announced Freelancer in 1999, two years after the start of development. At the same time, Roberts convinced 20th Century Fox to back a $30 million movie version of Wing Commander, which lost nearly $20 million. Stuart Moulder, the Microsoft general manager who oversaw the software giant’s relationship with Digital Anvil, came to believe that Microsoft money intended for game development was instead used for the movie. “[Roberts’] energy and attention and some of the funds were siphoned off for that movie,” Moulder says. “The Digital Anvil investment has to be looked at as largely a failure.”

Roberts concedes that Microsoft was frustrated with the time he spent on the movie but says funds used for it were appropriate because they came from Microsoft’s purchase of the minority stake, with the proceeds earmarked for general business purposes that included moviemaking. Either way, Microsoft acquired full control of Digital Anvil in 2001, and Roberts left the company. It would be another two years before Freelancerhit stores as a much smaller game than envisioned.

Free of Microsoft, Roberts went full Hollywood. He got in on the business side of things by cofounding production company Ascendant Pictures, which made several mostly forgettable movies like Outlander (2008) and The Big White (2005). Roberts got a producer credit on Ascendant’s most successful film, Lord of War, starring Nicolas Cage.



Despite stars like Nicolas Cage, Chris Roberts' films flopped, and he remained a Hollywood outlander.
But things were shaky. To make the movies, Roberts teamed up with a German lawyer, Ortwin Freyermuth, who is now vice chairman of Cloud Imperium. They arranged financing from an investment fund that was using a tax scheme to raise money in Germany for Hollywood movies. By 2006 the German government had stopped the practice, and the fund’s founder was sentenced to jail for tax fraud, according to Variety. Roberts and Freyermuth were not implicated.

With the German money dried up, things were bleak in Tinseltown. Kevin Costner sued Ascendant Pictures at the end of 2005, claiming it reneged on a deal to pay him $8 million to act in a comedy. (Ascendant denied wrongdoing and the suit was settled.) Roberts sold Ascendant Pictures in 2010 to a small production company called Bigfoot Entertainment, which had offices in Los Angeles and the Philippines.
Roberts’ Hollywood days were over. It was time to get back to gaming.

On a summer Saturday in 2007, a trespasser slipped by a security gate and entered Chris Roberts’ L.A. home. Inside, Madison Peterson, Roberts’ former common-law wife, with whom he had a long on-and-off relationship, was startled and feared her young daughter could be harmed or kidnapped. Peterson later identified the trespasser as Sandi Gardiner, who is now Roberts’ wife (for the second time) and a cofounder of Cloud Imperium. Roberts reported the incident to police, and a California judge issued a temporary restraining order that required Gardiner to stay 100 yards away from Peterson, who claimed in her temporary restraining order application that Gardiner had been stalking and threatening both her and her daughter for nearly three years.

“Ms. Gardiner has an unnatural and irrational fascination with my daughter and me,” Peterson wrote. “I constantly and continually look to make sure my daughter and I are not watched.”



In a court-filed declaration he signed at the time, Roberts said Gardiner had also visited Peterson’s San Diego home and once became violent and tried to strangle him. “I believed that if she had a gun she would have killed me,” Roberts said in the declaration. “I believe that Ms. Gardiner is not emotionally stable.” After three months, the restraining order was dissolved. Today, Roberts says he cannot recall signing the declaration and that what is ascribed to him in the court filings was prepared by Peterson and false. Despite the documentation, Gardiner flatly denies the incidents took place.

A few years later, Roberts cofounded Cloud Imperium with Gardiner and Freyermuth, his lawyer partner from Hollywood. He had remarried Gardiner in 2009. Their first marriage was annulled in 2005, court records show. An actress who is still trying to make it in Hollywood, the 43-year-old Australian-born Gardiner is also Cloud Imperium’s head of marketing and a driving force behind the company’s fundraising.



The initial 2012 crowdfunding campaign was successful, but it turned out that $6.2 million wasn’t nearly enough to feed Roberts’ ambitions. But Roberts and Gardiner came up with an ingenious way to keep raising funds: They would sell spaceships—hundreds of thousands of them.

Star Citizen has gigantic ships and tiny ships, exploration ships and cargo ships, refueling ships and mining ships, heavy fighters, light fighters, medium fighters, snub fighters, destroyers, gunships and many, many more. By Forbes’ count, Cloud Imperium has sold 135 different spaceship models for as much as $3,000 apiece. Eighty-seven of these ships have been completed to the point that players can fly them in the buggy early versions of Star Citizen; some of the other 48 ships seem like little more than fancy images.



“Nobody is obligated to buy more than just the starter ship,” says Gardiner. “All of the marketing is done by the fans virally, and a lot of those ships are because the community has asked for them.”
“[The] marketing of the game has been an objective success, as we’re the most crowdfunded anything, [and it] was overseen by Sandi,” Roberts says.

To supercharge the money that Gardiner was raising, Roberts brought in a big outside investor for the first time last fall. Cloud Imperium received $46 million from Clive Calder, the South African billionaire behind Jive Records, and his son, Keith. The funds are meant for—what else?—more marketing.



Cloud Imperium has churned out new versions of ships it has already sold and allows players to trade in their old ships to help buy new ones. The company also introduced the concept of “warbonds,” selling ships at a discount if new cash is used to purchase them. Players gain elite concierge club status by spending $1,000 (High Admiral) or $10,000 (Wing Commander). High-status players get bonus items like the “arclight II laser pistol executive edition” or a digital bottle of space whiskey.

It may seem silly, but there are real victims. Ken Lord is a 39-year-old data scientist from the Denver area, who suffers from worsening multiple sclerosis. Lord first backed Star Citizenin 2013 and eventually spent $4,500 buying spaceships. Last year, Lord unsuccessfully sued Cloud Imperium for a refund. “You take something that is bad, like spending too much money on a video game, and turn it into a socially exclusive club and make it desirable—cheers to their marketing department,” he says. (Bizarrely, Lord, who claims to have “poor impulse control,” continued to buy more spaceships after his lawsuit failed.)



“It’s not my place to talk about what people spend their money on,” says Gardiner.

When asked what it was like to work at Cloud Imperium, one former senior game maker who left in 2018 messaged a link to the Spinal Tapmovie scene with an amplifier volume knob turned to 11. Former employees say Roberts gets involved in the smallest details and pushes huge and complex investments in areas that are not worth the effort. At one point, one of the company’s senior graphics engineers was ordered by Roberts to spend months, through several iterations, getting the visual effects of the ship shields just right. In addition, workers have had to spend weeks on end making demos so that Cloud Imperium can keep selling spaceships—and raising more money.
Before David Jennison quit as Cloud Imperium’s lead character artist in 2015, he wrote a letter to human resources—it leaked on the internet—trying to explain why he completed only five characters in 17 months. One problem, Jennison said, was that Roberts frequently reversed approvals for the characters he was working on. “All the decisions for the character pipeline and approach had been made by Roberts,” Jennison wrote. “It became clear that this was a companywide pattern—CR dictates all.”

A company spokesman retorts: “It does say ‘Chris Roberts’ on the box, so one would naturally expect him to be quite involved with decision-making.”
“The game they promised us can’t even barely run. The performance is terrible. . . . I want out. They lied to us.”​
As in the past, Roberts also seems superfocused on the blockbuster-movie aspect of his game. Cloud Imperium hired a large and presumably expensive cast, even by today’s gaming standards, including Gary Oldman, Mark Hamill, Gillian Anderson and several other prominent actors, and flew them to London. There Roberts personally directed them for Squadron 42 in a motion-capture studio built by actor Andy Serkis. Gardiner also joined the cast.

At one point, Roberts set the release date for Squadron 42 in the fall of 2015, with a full commercial version of Star Citizen coming in 2016. Roberts now says a beta version of Squadron 42 will come out in 2020 and has stopped trying to guess when Star Citizenwill happen. But the footage of Oldman and Hamill in their motion-capture suits has already proved useful, making its way into promotional videos. “Having a cinematic story with big actors is what people expect from me,” Roberts says.

The Federal Trade Commission has received 129 consumer complaints related to Cloud Imperium, involving requests for refunds as high as $24,000, according to information revealed by a Freedom of Information Act request. “The game they promised us can’t even barely run. The performance is terrible and it’s still in an ‘Alpha’ state,” complained a Florida resident who claimed last year to have spent $1,000. “I want out. They lied to us.”
Cloud Imperium says its policy of granting refunds to fans who make requests within 30 days is fair, adding that the company is being transparent about its game development. Even though not a single one of the 100 promised star systems has been finished, Roberts says Cloud Imperium has built tools that will expedite the building of future planets and moons, and claims the first star system will be the largest and most complex. For now, fans pay $45 for an introductory ship and access to what has been built, and the backers have something in their hands. Calling it a game is a stretch, but that doesn’t stop Roberts.

Chris Roberts (left) and Mark Hamill, who has starred in Roberts' video games, at an awards ceremony in 2015.
ALLEN BEREZOVSKY/GETTY IMAGES

Star Citizen is a playable game,” Roberts insists. “It has more functionality and content than a lot of finished games.” He adds that 40,000 people played the game together online over a recent week and that criticism of Cloud Imperium’s development work is fueled by online trolls. There are many believers. “I have complete faith,” says Dan Paulsen, a backer of Star Citizen since 2016. “If there’s a delay, it’s for a good reason. It’s because they want it to be a better project.”
By Forbes’ count Cloud Imperium has sold 135 different spaceship models for as much as $3,000 each.​
Last year Cloud Imperium released financials that showed its biggest expense was annual salaries of $30 million. But the documents did not detail how much Roberts and Gardiner have been paid over the years. In September 2018, the Roberts Family Trust, with Gardiner as its trustee, purchased a house for $4.7 million in L.A.’s Pacific Palisades neighborhood. Prior to that, Roberts had been renting. Roberts says he sold his Hollywood house in 2007 because he wanted to experience living near the ocean. He then rented for ten years because he wasn’t sure if he would like it or stay in L.A. long-term.

“I was quite successful before I founded Cloud Imperium,” Roberts says, adding that he was a partner at Origin, which EA bought in 1992 for $37 million, and that he was paid as the majority owner of Digital Anvil when Microsoft acquired it. Roberts has emphatically said he is not lining his pockets from Cloud Imperium and that the company’s fundraising is ethical. Roberts says he is compensated like a typical C-suite game executive.
“I know everyone thinks we just have $200 million in the bank and we dive off into it like Scrooge McDuck or something,” he says, and points out that many players view Star Citizen as a hobby they spend money on, like golf. “All I know is when people come to me, I say, ‘Look, you don’t need to spend anything more on this game than $45.’ "
https://www.forbes.com/sites/mattperez/2019/05/01/exclusive-the-saga-of-star-citizen-a-video-game-that-raised-300-millionbut-may-never-be-ready-to-play/
 
Joined
Jun 15, 2016
Messages
1,041 (0.92/day)
Location
Pristina
System Name My PC
Processor 4670K@4.4GHz
Motherboard Gryphon Z87
Cooling CM 212
Memory 2x8GB+2x4GB @2400GHz
Video Card(s) XFX Radeon RX 580 GTS Black Edition 1425MHz OC+, 8GB
Storage Intel 530 SSD 480GB + Intel 510 SSD 120GB + 2x500GB hdd raid 1
Display(s) HP envy 32 1440p
Case CM Mastercase 5
Audio Device(s) Sbz ZXR
Power Supply Antec 620W
Mouse G502
Keyboard G910
Software Win 10 pro
I remember duke nuke forever when it was out people had vertigo for 2-3 day aftewr playing it for 15 min so yeah this one is same c**p.
 
Joined
Nov 3, 2013
Messages
1,328 (0.64/day)
Location
Tokyo, Ota
Processor i5 - 7300HQ
Memory 8GB DDR4
Video Card(s) 1060 6GB
Storage 180GB m.2 SATA | 250GB 850Evo SATA
Display(s) FHD 15" Gsync IPS + Acer H243H
Mouse Rival 300
Keyboard Apex m500 (mx red)
I remember duke nuke forever when it was out people had vertigo for 2-3 day aftewr playing it for 15 min so yeah this one is same c**p.
At least that game came out. This one, the way it's being (mis)managed, will most likely never see full release, and definitely not with everything that was promised...
 
Joined
Jul 16, 2014
Messages
2,832 (1.55/day)
Location
SE Michigan
System Name Dumbass
Processor AMD-9370BE @4.6
Motherboard ASUS SABERTOOTH 990FX R2.0 +SB950
Cooling CM Nepton 280L
Memory G.Skill Sniper 16gb DDR3 2400
Video Card(s) GreenTeam 1080 Gaming X 8GB
Storage C:\SSD (240GB), D:\Seagate (2TB), E:\Western Digital (1TB)
Display(s) 1x Nixeus NX_EDG27, 2x Dell S2440L (16:9)
Case Phanteks Enthoo Primo w/8 140mm SP Fans
Audio Device(s) onboard (realtek?) SPKRS:Logitech Z623 200w 2.1
Power Supply Corsair HX1000i
Mouse Logitech G700s
Keyboard Logitech G910 Orion Spark
Software windows 10
Benchmark Scores https://i.imgur.com/aoz3vWY.jpg?2
damn thats a long read.
 
Joined
May 19, 2009
Messages
1,305 (0.35/day)
Location
Latvia
System Name Personal \\ Work - HP EliteBook 840 G3
Processor i7-4790K \\ i7-6500U
Motherboard MSI Z97 Gaming 7
Cooling Noctua DH-15
Memory Corsair Vengeance Pro 32GB 2400 MHz \\ 16GB DDR4-2133
Video Card(s) ASUS RoG Strix 1070 Ti\\ Intel 520 HD
Storage Samsung 850 Pro 512GB, WD Black 2 TB \\ Samsung 256GB SSD
Display(s) BenQ XL2411Z \\ FullHD + 2x HP ZR2440w external screens via docking station
Case Fractal Design Define Arc Midi R2 with window
Audio Device(s) Realtek ALC1150 with Logitech Z323
Power Supply Corsair AX860i
Software Windows 10
You should see the threads this story made on Star Citizen reddit. It was quite a sad sight.
 
Joined
Feb 3, 2017
Messages
1,507 (1.68/day)
Processor i5-8400
Motherboard ASUS ROG STRIX Z370-I GAMING
Cooling CRYORIG C7 Cu
Memory 2*16GB DDR4-3200 CL16
Video Card(s) Gainward GeForce RTX 2080 Phoenix
Storage 1TB Samsung 970 Pro, 1TB Samsung 850 EVO, 1TB Crucial MX500
Display(s) ASUS PG279Q, Eizo EV2736W
Case Dan Cases A4-SFX
Power Supply Corsair SF600
Mouse Logitech G700
Keyboard Corsair K60
Read through the story. I do not really get the point.

There seems to be 2 main complaints:
1. It has taken 7 years and there is no full release. There are playable alpha bits of everything. Feature creep is hell of a thing, especially when they passed from tens to hundreds of millions.
2. They are selling ships for large amounts of money. Well, getting large amounts of money in general. Beyond hinting at buyers being idiots, why shouldn't RSI do that?

Yes, I funded Star Citizen for whatever the basic amount was. I strongly dislike the ship selling and insurance schemes etc. Unfortunately that is the spirit of the age right now and there is not much I can do about it. The bits of game that are playable are clearly very polished visually, basic mechanics are largely in place and the games are progressing.

Edit:
Personal life is a strange thing to drag into discussion about Star Citizen. Previous failed developments are a two-way thing, I loved Freelancer and Wing Commander movie was quite watchable for me.

I mean, dude definitely has vision. Maybe not the right management chops but I am not convinced that there are signs of failure yet. The "bad" example of getting the artist to do the shield effect just right does not sound bad at all to me, just the opposite. As long as they are able to fund their development this should turn out just fine.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Oct 24, 2004
Messages
1,049 (0.19/day)
System Name Seriously ?
Processor Core i7 4790K @ 4.4Ghz
Motherboard MSI Z97 Gaming 5
Cooling Alpenföhne Broken 120 + 2 huge coolermaster chassis fans
Memory 2x8GB DDR3 2133Mhz Crucial Ballistix
Video Card(s) interim : Sapphire R9 270
Storage 2x60gb Kingston SSDnow 320 / 1x120gb Crucial SSD C300 / 1 WD caviar black 1tb
Display(s) 40" Samsung UE40ES5500
Case Cooler Master HAF932
Audio Device(s) onboard realtek audio
Power Supply Corsair AX1200
Mouse Microsoft intellimouse optical
Keyboard Logitech K270
Software Windows 10 Pro
Benchmark Scores https://valid.x86.fr/vmb641
Is it possible to add a tldnr; for the people passing by ?
 
Joined
Aug 13, 2010
Messages
4,327 (1.33/day)
Here's a tl;dnr - Star Citizen is possibly the most enthusiastic PC game project of all time with an incredibly long feature list, being simultaneously developed by about 5 small-medium sized studios around the globe. They were busy for about 3 years in just getting the (Then) Cryengine to cooperate with this kind of MMO space simulation. The teams reverse engineered the engine a lot to make it fit the project. Now days features get added in a stable, yet small in a microcosm of feature list they build. Will they ever finish it? I don't think anybody can know by now.
 

dorsetknob

"YOUR RMA REQUEST IS CON-REFUSED"
Joined
Mar 17, 2005
Messages
8,183 (1.56/day)
Location
Dorset where else eh? >>> Thats ENGLAND<<<
many View this as a Digital Ponzi game Development
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2014
Messages
9,434 (5.34/day)
Location
Too Long to fit in a single line here.
Processor i7 8700k 4.7Ghz @ 1.26v
Motherboard AsRock Fatal1ty K6 Z370
Cooling beQuiet! Dark Rock Pro 3
Memory 16GB Corsair Vengeance LPX 3200/C16
Video Card(s) MSI GTX 1080 Gaming X @ 2100/5500
Storage Samsung 850 EVO 1TB + Samsung 830 256GB + Crucial BX100 250GB + Toshiba 1TB HDD
Display(s) Eizo Foris FG2421
Case Fractal Design Define C TG
Power Supply EVGA G2 750w
Mouse Logitech G502 Protheus Spectrum
Keyboard Sharkoon MK80 (Brown)
Software W10 x64
This kinda reads like the discussion on this game over a year ago. And when it pops up again every time CIG announces a new fund raiser.

Still just sitting back and taking it all in, if it gets to the finish line, awesome. If it doesn't, thanks for trying I suppose. What I've seen so far, I would classify as 'promising'. It takes long, yes. We know it takes long. I also know people are impatient and a large portion of the MMO fanbase has mental issues and problems with impulsiveness and discipline (I could write books full of examples from many MMOs...). They're taking advantage of that, and at the same time, people are responsible for it themselves. Those lawsuits for refunds after spending thousands of dollars... that is looney bin material from beginning to end. The real question there is why did you spend it in the first place, and the answer is probably some sort of therapist.

Much of the dissatisfaction you read comes from exactly those people. They're extremely vocal about something that they never really had anyway, and act like someone stole from them - clearly people who cannot read fine print. I think there is some irony in all of this as well; it is exactly because these people keep funding more, that Roberts never gets a reality check and is forced to make choices. Right now he's probably still thinking 'what other pockets of air can we put in that store?'

As for managerial skills. The man's track record isn't fantastic; yet on the other hand it is filled with finished projects. You may or may not like the state of them, but still. He's doing better than Molyneux and that guy even still released Black&White anyway. So... relax, sit back, and enjoy your popcorn :)
 
Last edited:
Joined
Nov 18, 2010
Messages
4,536 (1.43/day)
Location
Rīga, Latvia
System Name HELLSTAR
Processor Intel 5960X @ 4.4GHz
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-X99-UD3
Cooling Custom Loop. 360+240 rads.
Memory 4x8GB Corsair Vengeance LPX 2966MHz 16-17-17-35
Video Card(s) ASUS 1080 Ti FE + water block
Storage Optane 900P + Samsung PM981 NVMe 1TB + 750 EVO 500GB
Display(s) Philips PHL BDM3270
Case Phanteks Enthoo Evolv ATX Tempered Glass
Audio Device(s) Sound Blaster ZxR
Power Supply Fractal Design Newton R3 1000W
Mouse Razer Basilisk
Keyboard Razer Deathstalker
Software Windows 10 insider
I play it now often after 3.5 patch. It is not that bad. I am having fun despite the bugs.

The development sticks to the plan. It is clearly shown what and when.
 
Joined
Dec 10, 2015
Messages
413 (0.31/day)
Location
Here
System Name Skypas
Processor Intel Core i7-6700
Motherboard Asus H170 Pro Gaming
Cooling Cooler Master Hyper 212X Turbo
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB
Video Card(s) MSI GTX 1060 Gaming X 6GB
Storage Corsair Neutron GTX 120GB + WD Blue 1TB
Display(s) LG 22EA63V
Case Corsair Carbide 400Q
Power Supply Seasonic SS-460FL2 w/ Deepcool XFan 120
Mouse Logitech B100
Keyboard Corsair Vengeance K70
Software Windows 10 Pro
They don't need to finish it quickly because they got the money and now all they have to do is doing something that if meaningful will deliver something to the backers and if not they can get away with something like "we are too ambitious and we failed, sorry". :laugh:
 

rtwjunkie

PC Gaming Enthusiast
Supporter
Joined
Jul 25, 2008
Messages
12,196 (3.04/day)
Location
Louisiana -Laissez les bons temps rouler!
System Name Bayou Devil
Processor Core i7-4790k 4.4Ghz @ 1.18v
Motherboard ASUS Z97 Deluxe
Cooling All air: 2x140mm Fractal exhaust; 3x 140mm Cougar Intake; Enermax T40F CPU cooler
Memory 2x 8GB Mushkin Redline DDR-3 1866
Video Card(s) MSI GTX 1080Ti Gaming X
Storage 1x 500 MX500 SSD; 1x 2TB WD Black; 2x 4TB WD Black;1x 2TB WD Green (eSATA)
Display(s) HP 27q 27" IPS @ 2560 x 1440
Case Fractal Design Define R4 Black w/Titanium front -windowed
Audio Device(s) Soundblaster Z
Power Supply Seasonic X-850
Mouse Coolermaster Sentinel III
Keyboard Logitech G610 Orion mechanical (Cherry Brown switches)
Software Windows 10 Pro 64-bit (Start10 & Fences 3.0 installed)
I remember duke nuke forever when it was out people had vertigo for 2-3 day aftewr playing it for 15 min so yeah this one is same c**p.
So in addition to bringing up something that doesn’t even have a nexus to the topic, you bring ip some onscure factoid about vertigo that I never experienced nor has anyone else I know who played that game.
 
Joined
Feb 13, 2016
Messages
667 (0.53/day)
Location
Buenos Aires, Argentina
System Name Ryzen Monster
Processor Ryzen 5 2600X
Motherboard Asus ROG Crosshair Hero VII WiFi
Cooling Corsair H100i RGB Platinum
Memory Corsair Vengeance 32GB (4x8GB) 2400Mhz
Video Card(s) Asus ROG Strix RX580 OC 8Gb
Storage 250Gb Samsung EVO SSD, OCZ 500Gb SSD WD M.2 500Gb, plus three spinners up to 1.5Tb
Display(s) Samsung C27F591 curved monitor 27" with FreeSync
Case Cooler Master Storm Trooper
Audio Device(s) Supreme FX on board
Power Supply Corsair RM850X full modular
Mouse AFX LMO216
Keyboard Corsair Strafe RGB Silent
Software Windows 10 x64 Start 10
Benchmark Scores 3DMark Time Spy 4532
Roberts has a moral duty to divulge how much he and his family receive from the crowd funding. I'm not suggesting that there's fraud, but a show of good faith always goes a long way.
 
Joined
Aug 9, 2008
Messages
4,869 (1.22/day)
Location
Kingston, Ontario Canada
System Name My Rig | Kids Rig
Processor Core i5 3570K @ 4.0 ghz 1.15 vcore | FX 8350 @4 ghz
Motherboard EVGA Z77 FTW 1.21 BIOS |Gigabyte 990FXA UD3 (rev 4.0)
Cooling CM Hyper 212 EVO R2-push/pull with 2x 120mm PWM | CM Hyper 212
Memory Mushkin Blackline 4GB x 4 (soon) 1600mhz XMP profile |G. Skill 4GB x 2 DDR3 1866mhz
Video Card(s) Sapphire RX 480 8gb | Asus Strix R9 390X 8GB
Storage Kingston SSDNOW V300 120/240 GB OS & Games / 1000 GB Data | 320GB OS / 500GB Data & Games
Display(s) Asus VA32AQ 32" IPS 60hz 1440P |Samsung S24D590 24" PLS 1080P
Case NZXT 810 Switch |Thermaltake Soprano Snow Edition
Audio Device(s) Asus Xonar DSX w/ Logitech z623 | Realtek
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA 750W 80+ Gold | CoolerMaster GS750M 80+ Bronze
Mouse Steelseries Rival 500 15 button mouse | Redragon Mammoth M801
Keyboard Razer Ornata Chroma w/ meka-membrane keys | MadCatz S.T.R.I.K.E. TE w/ Kailh brown
Software Windows 10 Pro | Windows 10 Pro
Benchmark Scores Thanks to Norton/Lt_JWS/Guitar for the 2nd pc parts :)
I remember duke nuke forever when it was out people had vertigo for 2-3 day aftewr playing it for 15 min so yeah this one is same c**p.
lol smoke some more dude........
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2014
Messages
9,434 (5.34/day)
Location
Too Long to fit in a single line here.
Processor i7 8700k 4.7Ghz @ 1.26v
Motherboard AsRock Fatal1ty K6 Z370
Cooling beQuiet! Dark Rock Pro 3
Memory 16GB Corsair Vengeance LPX 3200/C16
Video Card(s) MSI GTX 1080 Gaming X @ 2100/5500
Storage Samsung 850 EVO 1TB + Samsung 830 256GB + Crucial BX100 250GB + Toshiba 1TB HDD
Display(s) Eizo Foris FG2421
Case Fractal Design Define C TG
Power Supply EVGA G2 750w
Mouse Logitech G502 Protheus Spectrum
Keyboard Sharkoon MK80 (Brown)
Software W10 x64
They don't need to finish it quickly because they got the money and now all they have to do is doing something that if meaningful will deliver something to the backers and if not they can get away with something like "we are too ambitious and we failed, sorry". :laugh:
Well you can rest assured this was Roberts' last sort of successful fundraiser then. And all those devs involved... man. That would be some real damage. I don't know, it just doesn't seem plausible. Given what they have already today, they could almost just hand the project over or even sell the IP. All those man hours, the lore, the code is definitely not going straight into the bin.

I sincerely believe that Roberts is just a man with lots of energy and a strong drive, a bit like Elon Musk, both are micro managers and have a very detailed vision of what they want. I think it needs no clarification that Musk does the job a tad better, maybe even in full reverse, with a massive task that gets trimmed back from time to time.
 
Joined
Mar 10, 2015
Messages
1,817 (1.14/day)
System Name Wut?
Processor 4770K @ 4.4
Motherboard MSI Z97 Gaming 7
Cooling Water
Memory 16GB DDR3 2400
Video Card(s) Vega 56
Storage 1TB SSD, forgot which one. Evo maybe?
Display(s) 3440 x 1440
Case Thermaltake T81
Power Supply Seasonic 750 Watt Gold
Well you can rest assured this was Roberts' last sort of successful fundraiser then. And all those devs involved... man. That would be some real damage. I don't know, it just doesn't seem plausible. Given what they have already today, they could almost just hand the project over or even sell the IP. All those man hours, the lore, the code is definitely not going straight into the bin.

I sincerely believe that Roberts is just a man with lots of energy and a strong drive, a bit like Elon Musk, both are micro managers and have a very detailed vision of what they want. I think it needs no clarification that Musk does the job a tad better, maybe even in full reverse, with a massive task that gets trimmed back from time to time.
What they both lack is the notion that perfection is not achievable. Perfection is a moving goal post that never stops. Large Projects need an initial fixed goal post to get the initial product out the door so that investors get paid. After that, you rely on iterative improvements to chase perfection.

If you refuse to launch a product until it is perfect, you will never fully launch it. This is more scoped to the software domain than physical product.
 
Joined
Nov 28, 2012
Messages
1,544 (0.64/day)
System Name N/A
Processor I3 3.5GHZ (3150)
Motherboard ASRock B85M-ITX
Cooling stock
Memory 8GB
Video Card(s) XFX GTX750Ti 2GB
Storage 1TB WD and 1TB Seagate
Display(s) LG 21.5" LCD IPS
Case CoolerMaster
Audio Device(s) Onboard
Power Supply Rosewill 610WATT
Mouse R.A.T3
Keyboard Razer BlackWidow
Software Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
I knew this would happen. Eversince the developer made this and it was delayed so many times due to funding issues. I wish this would be completed but at least I had fun with a mod for a freelancer named Tow "Tides of War" a Star Wars Mod

 
Joined
Jul 21, 2018
Messages
346 (0.95/day)
Location
Germany
System Name Athlon Dragon
Processor AMD Threadripper 1950X
Motherboard Modified ASUS ROG-STRIX-X399
Cooling Dual custom-loop watercooling
Memory 32GB (4x8GB)
Video Card(s) RX Vega 64
Storage Samsung 860 EVO
Display(s) 24", 1440p, freesync, 144hz
Case Thermaltake Core X9
Audio Device(s) beyerdynamic MMX 300
Power Supply EVGA Supernova T2 1600W
Mouse OG steelseries Sensei
Keyboard steelseries 6Gv2
Software Windows 10
Benchmark Scores GPUPI 1B GPU - 13.637s
I´ve been one of the first backers of StarCitizen and from the start I knew this would A) take ages and B) may not even be completed ever.

But there was the slight chance that the many ideas would eventually form into a playable experience and what I did was bet on that chance. It was worth it for me to throw money down that way just to try to get a game that would be as immersive and joyful as I hoped it to be.
And after I played the alpha last year and went back to check it out this year I dropped more money on it because parts of the dream are done. They work and I can tell you walking up to my ship the first time on that station, climbing in and taking of with the looks, sounds and the feel of everything brought many tears to my eyes.
This already is an experience for me that is unmatched by current games and yes I have played elite and other stuff and funnily enough, these games like elite have finished content and many things to do yet still feel bland and boring to me. I can´t stand those, but in StarCitizen my immersion sucks a special kind of atmosphere in, it just feels 'real' in a sense.

Whatever will come out of it next, I already got paid back more than the 400$ I spend on it. 400$ for multiple moments of intense goosebumps, and whoa WTH moments. Tears of joy and awe. I´m in love. Yes many or even most people will not understand that since it is just my personal attachment to the game. But for me, the last 400$ I spend on modern titles and games like elite felt far more wasted than the 400$ I threw at this unfinished game.

Long story short, It may never finish but it is already 'ready to play' for me. You can have a lot of fun already. But this applies to a niche of players, like me, who look for a believable, immersive experience filled with atmosphere. Btw flying with high end joysticks is kind of mandatory for the experience, I mean common if you drop multiple hunderts of dollars on the game itself atleast get a joystick instead of trying to find any fun with a cheap controller.
 
Joined
Nov 18, 2010
Messages
4,536 (1.43/day)
Location
Rīga, Latvia
System Name HELLSTAR
Processor Intel 5960X @ 4.4GHz
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-X99-UD3
Cooling Custom Loop. 360+240 rads.
Memory 4x8GB Corsair Vengeance LPX 2966MHz 16-17-17-35
Video Card(s) ASUS 1080 Ti FE + water block
Storage Optane 900P + Samsung PM981 NVMe 1TB + 750 EVO 500GB
Display(s) Philips PHL BDM3270
Case Phanteks Enthoo Evolv ATX Tempered Glass
Audio Device(s) Sound Blaster ZxR
Power Supply Fractal Design Newton R3 1000W
Mouse Razer Basilisk
Keyboard Razer Deathstalker
Software Windows 10 insider
Joined
Jun 28, 2015
Messages
576 (0.39/day)
Funny...

ALL good active multiplayer games are perpetually in development and will never be "Ready to play".

League of Legends being a prime example, as soon as development will stop, the game will die as people get bored after figuring out the mins & maxes. It has to keep changing to keep player interest.
 
Joined
Aug 20, 2007
Messages
11,324 (2.60/day)
System Name Pioneer
Processor Intel i9 9900k @ Stock
Motherboard ASRock Z390 Taichi
Cooling Noctua NH-D15 + A whole lotta Sunon and Corsair Maglev blower fans...
Memory G.SKILL TridentZ Series 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 @ DDR4-3400 14-14-14-34-2T
Video Card(s) EVGA GTX 1080 FTW2
Storage HGST UltraStar 7K6000 3.5" HDD 2TB 7200 RPM (w/128MBs of Cache)
Display(s) LG 32GK850G-B 1440p 32" AMVA Panel G-Sync 144hz Display
Case Thermaltake Core X31
Audio Device(s) Onboard Toslink to Schiit Modi Multibit to Asgard 2 Amp to AKG K7XX Ruby Red Massdrop Headphones
Power Supply Seasonic PRIME 750W 80Plus Titanium
Mouse ROCCAT Kone EMP
Keyboard WASD CODE 104-Key w/ Cherry MX Green Keyswitches, Doubleshot Vortex PBT White Transluscent Keycaps
Software Windows 10 x64
I mean, dude definitely has vision. Maybe not the right management chops but I am not convinced that there are signs of failure yet. The "bad" example of getting the artist to do the shield effect just right does not sound bad at all to me, just the opposite. As long as they are able to fund their development this should turn out just fine.
The most disturbing reality to me is the money is mostly gone, and the game hasn't left Alpha. Let everything else fall aside, that's damning. That's no time to be messing with shield cosmetics.
 
Joined
Mar 13, 2014
Messages
3,827 (1.96/day)
Processor i7 7700k
Motherboard MSI Z270 SLI Plus
Cooling CM Hyper 212 EVO
Memory 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance
Video Card(s) MSI GTX 980 Ti GAMING
Storage Samsung 850 EVO 250 GB and WD Black 4TB
Display(s) ASUS 27 inch 1440p PLS PB278Q
Case Corsair Obsidian 750D Airflow Edition
Audio Device(s) Onboard
Power Supply EVGA SuperNova 850 W Gold
Mouse Logitech G502
Keyboard Logitech G105
Software Windows 10
The most disturbing reality to me is the money is mostly gone, and the game hasn't left Alpha. Let everything else fall aside, that's damning. That's no time to be messing with shield cosmetics.
But the money keeps rolling in. Around 30 million dollars a year.
 
Joined
Aug 20, 2007
Messages
11,324 (2.60/day)
System Name Pioneer
Processor Intel i9 9900k @ Stock
Motherboard ASRock Z390 Taichi
Cooling Noctua NH-D15 + A whole lotta Sunon and Corsair Maglev blower fans...
Memory G.SKILL TridentZ Series 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 @ DDR4-3400 14-14-14-34-2T
Video Card(s) EVGA GTX 1080 FTW2
Storage HGST UltraStar 7K6000 3.5" HDD 2TB 7200 RPM (w/128MBs of Cache)
Display(s) LG 32GK850G-B 1440p 32" AMVA Panel G-Sync 144hz Display
Case Thermaltake Core X31
Audio Device(s) Onboard Toslink to Schiit Modi Multibit to Asgard 2 Amp to AKG K7XX Ruby Red Massdrop Headphones
Power Supply Seasonic PRIME 750W 80Plus Titanium
Mouse ROCCAT Kone EMP
Keyboard WASD CODE 104-Key w/ Cherry MX Green Keyswitches, Doubleshot Vortex PBT White Transluscent Keycaps
Software Windows 10 x64
But the money keeps rolling in. Around 30 million dollars a year.
That... isn't what I'd call wise, considering he just nearly literally burned quite a ton more than that, but hey, that's just me. Who questions the swarm anyways? BUY BUY BUY.
 
Joined
Mar 13, 2014
Messages
3,827 (1.96/day)
Processor i7 7700k
Motherboard MSI Z270 SLI Plus
Cooling CM Hyper 212 EVO
Memory 2 x 8 GB Corsair Vengeance
Video Card(s) MSI GTX 980 Ti GAMING
Storage Samsung 850 EVO 250 GB and WD Black 4TB
Display(s) ASUS 27 inch 1440p PLS PB278Q
Case Corsair Obsidian 750D Airflow Edition
Audio Device(s) Onboard
Power Supply EVGA SuperNova 850 W Gold
Mouse Logitech G502
Keyboard Logitech G105
Software Windows 10
That... isn't what I'd call wise, considering he just nearly literally burned quite a ton more than that, but hey, that's just me. Who questions the swarm anyways? BUY BUY BUY.
Wise or not it's still money. One day the game will finished an it will probably be one of the greatest PC games ever made.
 
Top