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Throttlestop CORE PL1 and Ring EDP OTHER limiting performance

Nexinity

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I have been using Throttlestop to undervolt my i5-9300H in my HP Pavilion Gaming 15-dk0068wm

Laptop: https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c06401026
i5-9300H: https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/191075/intel-core-i5-9300h-processor-8m-cache-up-to-4-10-ghz.html
Guide I used to undervolt: https://www.ultrabookreview.com/31385-the-throttlestop-guide/

I have undervolted -0.140mv on CPU Core and Cache and -0.050mv on the iGPU Unslice with 100% stability.
I notice that when I use AIDA64 and run a stability test, the CPU boosts to 4.0Ghz at 60-65W with temps at around 80-85C, and after around 30 seconds, it'll drop down to the TDP of 45W at around 3.4Ghz with CORE PL1 and Ring EDP OTHER Red.

Is there any way I can keep it forced to 60W under a full synthetic load and 4.0Ghz? This seems like wasted potential...
 

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unclewebb

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HP locks down many of their laptops. Your laptop is set to throttle based on an internal power limit set by HP and there is usually nothing you can do about it.

You can try under volting the CPU core more than the CPU cache. Some of these CPUs can be run reliably with the core at -200 mV. Use Cinebench R20 for testing purposes. This can free up some of the power budget so the CPU can run faster at its 45W limit. To undervolt the Intel GPU, you usually need to undervolt the Intel GPU and the iGPU Unslice equally.

No point in changing the turbo ratios. This CPU is not adjustable. The turbo ratios are locked internally to 41, 41, 40, 40.

You are right. At 45W, your CPU and GPU temps are great. There appears to be no thermal reason for HP to limit enthusiasts like this.
 
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Nexinity

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Thank you so much! I was already working on undervolting more right after I posted :clap:
I do think its wasted performance, and this was with the GPUs under full load too, maximizing all heat output
To undervolt the Intel GPU, you usually need to undervolt the Intel GPU and the iGPU Unslice equally.
Is there a reason to undervolt the Intel GPU? Will this help performance?
 

unclewebb

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Will this help performance?
Not really. When gaming, you are probably not using the Intel GPU. I just saw that you were under volting the unslice so wanted to let you know that if the Intel GPU is not also under volted, your request will likely be ignored.
 

Nexinity

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Not really. When gaming, you are probably not using the Intel GPU. I just saw that you were under volting the unslice so wanted to let you know that if the Intel GPU is not also under volted, your request will likely be ignored.
Thank you, Ill be avoiding it in my profiles.

I just did two Cinebench runs and it was at 55W at around 75-80C and halfway through it went down to 45 and PL1 and EDP OTHER went red. Is this something HP set and cannot be changed?

Also, I would like to thank you for your constant support towards throttlestop; I would be kinda lost without you ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Edit: I've also realized how undervolting improves both thermals and performance. Dropping the voltage with drop the amount of watts used while keeping the same clock speed during turbo speeds. This in turn reduces heat used while improving efficiency of the processor, as less power is now used during high speed clocks since the voltage is lower than out of the box, but still high enough to keep it running. It makes sense for the manufacturer though, since the voltages are bumped up to reduce error without extensive testing needed to be done, since not all silicon is the same. Smart on HP, bad on enthusiasts.
 
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unclewebb

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Is this something HP set and cannot be changed?
There are duplicate sets of turbo power limits. There is a third set of turbo power limits controlled by an EC that manufacturers can set. Only some manufacturers are using this third set of turbo power limits. ThrottleStop and Intel XTU do not have any access to control these.

In your laptop, HP has locked this third set of power limits to 45W long term. The lowest set power limit always wins. No matter what you do with software, you will always be limited to 45W long term.

The only way I have heard to try to get around this limit is to use a modified BIOS that changes the IMON slope percentage. This can be used to trick the CPU. Instead of the CPU thinking that it is running at 50W, it will think it is only running at 25W. Turbo boost will no longer be power limit throttled. As far as I know, HP laptops have a well locked down BIOS so you are much more likely to brick your laptop compared to succeeding at this mod.
 
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