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Vcore To Set In Bios

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#1
I currently have a 2500k and I have a question about setting the vcore in the bios. I have a MSI Z68A GD65 G3 motherboard and currently whatever voltage I set in the bios the real voltage at idle is about 0.04v less. Ex 1.46v set in bios and 1.42 seen in CPUID on idle and around 1.36 during load with 100% LLC which I know is from vdroop. My main question is, the magical 1.4v threshold for this chip, is that the voltage that should be set in the bios, the desired idle voltage, or the desired load voltage? What I want to know is if I should increase the voltage in the bios beyond my desired value to offset and achieve my intended value. My board doesn't support using offsets just manual voltage control

so I've been running some tests and last observations are with a vcore of 1.49v set in the bios i have an idle of 1.44v in windows which drops down to 1.344 during IBT and 1.360 during prime all with "Vdroop Offset Control" set to 100% (lower % = more Vdroop) I'm using a x45 mutil to set my clocks to 4.5GHz but I still cant get stable, I adjusted I/O voltage and PLL to where I now only get a x0101 BSOD. The system was stable through IBT and about 30 minutes of prime but did not last overnight. I don't know how long it lasted since I was sleeping and woke up to it off. I have a WC loop so during testing my temps never exceeded 72C. I find my Vdroop a bit extreme and feel like it's causing my instability , this is with all power saving features disabled
 
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#2
You should try with power saving enabled. This will allow you to set a higher VID in the BIOS (as you will be idling at a lower p state therefor a lower VID giving you a lower real world idle voltage).Make sur eyou are using offset not static voltages.

droop of about 0.05-0.13v is pretty darn normal depending on the board.

OCCT will replace prime95 and whatever linpack frontend you are using.It has built in P95 and AVX linpack, and stops on error with logs so you know what happened.
 
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Processor 955 BE C2 currently @ 3.8GHz
Motherboard M4A785TD-V EVO AM3
Cooling XSPC Rasa 750
Memory A-DATA 4 x 2GB DDR3 1600
Video Card(s) x2 Crossfire SAPPHIRE 6950(Flashed to 6970)
Storage Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 7200 RPM
Power Supply Corsair 850HX
Software Windows 7 x64
#3
thing is my board doesnt support using offset so auto and static voltages are all I got. And I guess what confuses me is when someone says they're at 4.5GHZ with a 1.34 vcore for example. Is the 1.34v what they set in their bios or is it what they have under load. Also even when I set my vcore really high in the bios (1.51v), my lowest load voltage is still about the same (1.32) which I would imagine to cause stability issues even with a really high voltage set in the bios. Its like no matter how much I increase my bios voltage my lowest load voltage barely, if even, changes. Is it that LLC is really bad on this board or am I missing something?

Gonna give OCCT a try too, sounds like an all in one package
 
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#4
MSI's military class components are pretty good on your board. LLC eliminates some Vdroop but not all and every system is different. The Vdroop could be from the PSU too I guess. HX 850's are pretty good thoug.
 

cadaveca

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#5
MSI's military class components are pretty good on your board. LLC eliminates some Vdroop but not all and every system is different. The Vdroop could be from the PSU too I guess. HX 850's are pretty good thoug.
Vdroop is a function of the VRM. Droop relates to current drawn by the CPU, and voltage lowers so that when load is removed from the CPU, excess current is converted to voltage, so the CPU doesn't get a sudden inrush of current during the milliseconds it moves from load it idle.


Increase the load, droop is larger, since the current draw is larger.

This is also why it's adjustable..since it's a routine for converting current to voltage, we can adjust the conversion rate, or set it to maintain a specific voltage, or a specific current.

All part of "GTL". ;)

GTL = Gunning Transceiver Logic.