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whats the best monitor : BenQ vs Samung vs Dell

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#26
Most VA panels have much better contrast and much deeper blacks compared to IPS. Bad viewing angles tho. Some VA panels can vary alot in response times tho, especially when going from bright to dark or vice versa. Some VA panels are very good. IPS is generally good and has less difference between best and worst.

Going from 60 Hz to 75 Hz is barely noticeable and many monitors will do frame skipping at 75 Hz, if they are 60 Hz native.

I'd get 100 Hz or better for gaming.

Maybe take a look at Acer's upcoming Nitro monitors. VG0 series. They will be "cheap" and have 1080p/1440p IPS with up to 144 Hz. They won't have the crappy PREDATOR logo on the front either.
 
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#27
Yup, had three cheap(er) VA panels BenQ 27", Philips 32" and a AOC 32", first two were 1080p the third was 1440p. Great contrast, good colors out of the box but slow response time coupled with very low input lag. Wich is a shame compared to IPS.
I would try a 1080p VA with 144Hz, but i don't know if i want to go back to 24".
For a typical viewing distance & PPI sweet spot 1080p/24 is still very much it. Sufficient size to fill your focused vision, which means its good for competitive play at native res too.

Still rocking the Eizo FG2421... no desire to 'upgrade' at all... Even though I would not mind 1440p getting a panel as nice as this one is going to easily cost 800+ eur
 

qubit

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#28
@Firas64 If you want a gaming monitor, get one with a higher refresh rate that's made for this. You'll get a better experience this way. I've got the BenQ XL2720Z which is great for this and does 144Hz + strobing. It's quite high end and the new version is expensive. There are cheaper versions though.

You mentioned casually overclocking a monitor. Note that it doesn't normally work unless the monitor has been specially made to overclock, so don't assume that your monitor will do it. For example, my BenQ will just about do 145Hz, but 146Hz gives a blank picture.
 
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#29
Sufficient size to fill your focused vision,
At home i use a 27" monitor since 2013. For competitive play, 23-24" screens are better, yes. But for single-player a bigger screen is better IMO.
 
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#30
I disagree with the comments that suggest a specific size is better for competitive play or whatever task you are doing. The ideal size is determined by the distance between you and the screen surface.

There is all sorts of advice on this, none is specific. For example, you will commonly hear "arm's length". What the heck does that mean? If you have T-Rex arms, does that mean you sit 12 inches from a 15" monitor? What if you are a knuckle dragger. Do you sit 40 inches from a 32 inch monitor?

You will also hear between 20 and 40 inches. Yeah, that's specific! :kookoo: And that's from OSHA! :rolleyes:

IMO, the ideal size monitor is the one the fills my field of vision without me having to constantly move my head back and forth and up and down. Oh and of course, that is with my computer glasses on! o_O YMMV
 
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#31
I disagree with the comments that suggest a specific size is better for competitive play or whatever task you are doing. The ideal size is determined by the distance between you and the screen surface.

There is all sorts of advice on this, none is specific. For example, you will commonly hear "arm's length". What the heck does that mean? If you have T-Rex arms, does that mean you sit 12 inches from a 15" monitor? What if you are a knuckle dragger. Do you sit 40 inches from a 32 inch monitor?

You will also hear between 20 and 40 inches. Yeah, that's specific! :kookoo: And that's from OSHA! :rolleyes:

IMO, the ideal size monitor is the one the fills my field of vision without me having to constantly move my head back and forth and up and down. Oh and of course, that is with my computer glasses on! o_O YMMV
Arm's length is basically somewhere in the range of 60-90cm and believe it or not, 95% of all people are in this range or very close to it. Its that way for many things that have to do with size. One size fits all very much applies to many things. Some variation in typical viewing distance always exists anyway because we tend to lean towards the screen as sessions get longer and attention to sitting properly wanes, that's when you edge closer to the 60cm bottom end ;) Screen diagonals + resolutions are also optimized for that, in a way that you're not counting pixels and when you can, you know you're sitting too close :)
 
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#32
I've gone through 4 monitors to find a perfect one, it's different in every case

1080p 60Hz VA was great.... until I saw how bad it was compared to an IPS. Switching from 60hz VA to 60Hz IPS felt like +10 fps faster, with all the smearing and ghosting that slow VA had. The IPS had baclight bleed though, so I got rid of it and will never buy an IPS again, the bleed and silverish blacks is something I cannot stand. I went to 1440p 144Hz TN and I knew that was the s**t for gaming, but the s2716dg had issues with gamma control and ULMB, so I got myself a 24" 1440p 165hz acer and this is the perfect monitor for gaming for me.

When Cyberpunk 2077 hits I'd like to replace my s2716dg which I'm using as secondary display with a HDR VA for vibrant colors and deep blacks. I just hope to get one with good overdrive control to limit my percepion of slow pixel response. 75Hz would be enough, just get rid of most of that smearing, I hate blurry image <puke>.
 
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#33
Arm's length is basically somewhere in the range of 60-90cm and believe it or not, 95% of all people are in this range or very close to it. Its that way for many things that have to do with size. One size fits all very much applies to many things.
Totally immaterial. And one size does not fit all.

You're assuming arm's length is ideal for those 95%. I know lots of people who game with their monitors 18" in front of their noses. Many with so called "gaming" notebooks do that. I also know lots of people who game on their big screen TVs. They are just as competitive as other gamers.

So I am sticking with what I said before, "The ideal size is determined by the distance between you and the screen surface" which might be 12 inches in front of your face, or 12 feet across the room.

Edit comment: Fixed typos
 
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#34
I've gone through 4 monitors to find a perfect one, it's different in every case

1080p 60Hz VA was great.... until I saw how bad it was compared to an IPS. Switching from 60hz VA to 60Hz IPS felt like +10 fps faster, with all the smearing and ghosting that slow VA had. The IPS had baclight bleed though, so I got rid of it and will never buy an IPS again, the bleed and silverish blacks is something I cannot stand. I went to 1440p 144Hz TN and I knew that was the s**t for gaming, but the s2716dg had issues with gamma control and ULMB, so I got myself a 24" 1440p 165hz acer and this is the perfect monitor for gaming for me.

When Cyberpunk 2077 hits I'd like to replace my s2716dg which I'm using as secondary display with a HDR VA for vibrant colors and deep blacks. I just hope to get one with good overdrive control to limit my percepion of slow pixel response. 75Hz would be enough, just get rid of most of that smearing, I hate blurry image <puke>.
I hate motion blur/smear too. The best way to get rid of it is with a high refresh rate monitor + strobe. I see that your Acer has 144/165Hz refresh + G-SYNC, so is great for this in its ULMB mode. My BenQ XL2720Z has 144Hz refresh + strobe that works with any brand of card and at any refresh rate. Motion is like a CRT on this monitor. The strobe is great at 60Hz for migraines. :laugh:
 
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#35
I hate motion blur/smear too. The best way to get rid of it is with a high refresh rate monitor + strobe. I see that your Acer has 144/165Hz refresh + G-SYNC, so is great for this in its ULMB mode. My BenQ XL2720Z has 144Hz refresh + strobe that works with any brand of card and at any refresh rate. Motion is like a CRT on this monitor. The strobe is great at 60Hz for migraines. :laugh:
TBH I rarely use ULMB, I play AAA tiltles mostly, and my 5775c+1080 can't do stable 120 fps even if I drop the settings. I still perefer having synced frames than strobing, when they're unsynced it puts me off, I can see the motion is not as fluid as with g-sync. TBH a TN with extreme ovrdrive running at 80-100 hz is not producing much blur anyway.

I agree though, ULMB is amazing when it comes to game immersion. I played hunderds of hours of dying light in ulmb mode at locked 120 fps and it was like real life.
 
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#36
There is some questionable advice and logic in some of the posts, based on my skimming. So, hopefully, this post will help to clarify a few things:

1) In no way can any TN panel ever be as good as an IPS panel or a decent VA panel, in terms of color/gamma consistency. It's impossible, because of the pixel type. TN panels have bad vertical gamma/color shift. It's the price you pay for the pixel type being the cheapest to make and, most importantly, the fastest to refresh.

2) TN panels are the fastest, but not all of them are overdriven well. LCD pixels need to be overdriven to reduce blur. The drawback is that if the overdrive is too aggressive you'll get artifacts that make graphics look bad, like trails.

3) VA panels, as far as I know (I stopped researching extensively a while ago) always have the worst response times in the darkest dark-to-light transitions, when compared with decently overdriven TN and IPS panels. This appears to be an unavoidable drawback of the VA pixel type. If this has finally been solved since I stopped extensively following monitor tech then that would be interesting to know. I doubt it, though. Even the fancy Eizo 24" strobing backlight 240 Hz gaming panel (really a satellite monitor for $5000 sold to gamers with grade B, or something less than A+, panels) struggled with these transitions.

4) A strobing backlight is critical if you want the least motion blur, but it can cause "eyestrain".

5) PWM vs. constant control backlighting. The former causes flicker. It may cause eye/brain fatigue, since it's literally a matter of shutting off the backlight and turning it back on again quickly constantly. The speed with which the refreshes occurs may make a big difference in terms of the amount of physical discomfort related to its use. I don't think there has been any scientific research into this. Constant control backlights don't flicker but they may have more difficulty with color shift related to brightness adjustments. Constant control backlighting became a lot more common once the public found out about PWM flicker, thanks to articles on sites like prad.de and tftcentral.

6) It was said that a 2000–3000 static contrast ratio in a VA panel is a red flag because other VA panels can go higher. It's not a red flag if you're seriously considering an IPS or TN panel, neither of which can get that level of contrast. The last time I checked, the best IPS and TN can do is a bit over 1000, like maybe as high as 1200:1. The lowest VA panel I recall seeing in recent years was around 2400:1.

7) VA panels are challenging for color-critical work because of their head-on black crush, a side effect of the pixel type. It is a fairly minor issue for people who don't do color-critical work. It is very minor when compared with the color/gamma shift of TN. However, some older VA panels did get quite washed out at wider angles, and had strong color shifts. They weren't as bad as TN is vertically, though.

8) IPS not only lacks the head-on black crush of VA but also has the widest viewing angle trueness to color/gamma. The bad sides of IPS are the reduced contrast, the polishing process involved in making IPS panels (which can negatively impact uniformity), and "IPS glow". IPS glow can be eliminated by the monitor maker adding a polarizer but they're all too cheap to do so anymore. VA panels have a much fainter deep violet glow.

9) Input lag is the most important criterion for competitive gamers doing fast-paced gaming. The nicest-looking monitor is bad news if it doesn't enable you to match your input timing with the output onscreen.

10) FreeSync and G-Sync. Look them up if you don't know what they are. If you don't know what they are, in enough depth to make an informed purchase, then you should read up. Although, look into the unbranded industry spec that addresses screen tearing.

11) For movies and slow-paced gaming (like Civilization), VA is the choice, no question. For the highest-speed most competitive gaming, it's TN, no question (with a strobing backlight, very low input lag, and 120 Hz at a minimum). For color-critical work, IPS is the choice, no question — unless you really need contrast, in which case you may want to consider using a calibrated OLED TV or something to make final adjustments related to contrast. OLED is likely to get burn-in or image retention if used as a computer screen but it doesn't have VA's black crush problem and it has even better contrast. Don't overestimate the importance of color accuracy as a gamer. Many males are partially red/green colorblind, too. If you are then you may want to artificially boost the red and green output of your panel anyway. I don't know if that helps with the colorblindness, though.

12) HDR. Read up about this. Eye-searing brightness might be a drawback for some but the 10-bit color could be nice enough. It seems than the industry is moving away from fake HDR schemes to a true standard that improves color rendering, grey precision, and increases the brightness. The last bit is, in my view, mainly to enable advertisers to irritate people more effectively with commercials.

13) Uniformity is important for color-critical work and for photographic work involving greyscale images. Contrast is important, but uniformity is also. The best pro screens have uniformity compensation tech that actually works. Some have the tech but it doesn't really do anything. OLED and plasma don't have such uniformity issues but they're not really suited for computer monitors because of retention and burn-in. Uniformity imperfection mainly involves gamma differences (darker and lighter areas of the screen surface).

14) Backlighting varies, in terms of there being edge-lit and multiple point rear backlighting. Edge lighting is cheaper but tends to be less uniform. One tactic monitor makers (but especially TV makers) often use is "local dimming". This involves a multiple point rear backlight, where some of the backlight is on and some of it is off, to increase contrast. Although these dimming schemes can increase perceived contrast they can also be noticeable.

15) Dynamic contrast is the contrast spec the industry has traditionally liked to peddle but it's deceptive. Stick with comparing static contrast ratios.

16) Panels typically come in 6-bit + 2 bits of FRC dithering, 8-bit, 8-bit + 2 bits of FRC dithering, and 10-bit. Anything above 10-bit, like 10 bits plus 2 bits of FRC dithering is probably overkill. For the tiny antiquated sRGB color space, which is the standard for video games and most consumer content even today, 6-bit color is fine. What's more important than the processing depth is the gamut (the range of colors) the backlight is capable of delivering. If it's 100% sRGB with smooth coverage then you're all set, even with 6-bit + 2 bits of dithering. This is, of course, if you don't mind minor shimmering effects from the dithering and don't need HDR's 10 bits. For color-critical work, you want an 8-bit panel at the minimum, but really should get at least an 8-bit + 2 bits of FRC panel. The color processing depth can mainly be thought of in terms of the smoothness of gradients — resistance to banding. However, more than one thing can cause banding. For color-critical work you want, at the minimum, around 100% coverage of the old AdobeRGB color space (bigger than sRGB but still inadequate). If you're going to be using professional printing it's ideal to have a panel that can cover the full gamuts of the CMYK print spaces.

17) Monitor speakers are trash. Ignore them.

18) Reduced blue light modes are nice to have, so you don't have to use f.lux. That software is annoying because it constantly shifts the color depending on the time of the day. Once you get used to the comfort from a warmer white point you'll probably never want to go back to the eye-searing cold bluish 6500K+ standard. Some panels ship calibrated even colder. A warmer white point is even nicer in dark rooms. Once you're warmer than 4700–5000K, though, you're really not worried about color accuracy so much as comfort. This is an example of why a non-graphics pro workload doesn't necessarily need color accuracy.

19) TVs can sometimes be good enough gaming monitors. Look for very low input lag, especially in any kind of special mode, like 120 Hz. Some TVs do very well in input lag at 60 Hz but are bad at 120. Also, don't forget screen tearing (FreeSync, G-Sync, etc.).

20) LCD performs best at its native resolution so try to pick the resolution that your system can handle. If you get more resolution than your system can handle then at least get what your next upgrade can handle. Otherwise, having 4K or more can be a drawback. I am a fan of the 32" 1440 format, personally. Remember, that when you sit further away from a screen the pixels seem smaller. If you sit far enough away you won't be able to see, for instance, any difference in quality between an 8K and a 4K screen. Yet, you're expending a lot more processing energy and storage space, let alone the price tags.

21) Curved or not curved. That is a question.

22) Wide screen, ultra-wide, or normal dimensions.

23) What is your budget?

24) Light anti-glare, strong anti-glare, semi-gloss, glossy but muted, shiny? These have all been options in the market. One Dell VA panel, for instance, was compared to a mirror because its untreated glass surface was so reflective. Another Dell had a strong "crystalline" look from the strong anti-glare treatment of the glass. Different people have different preferences about anti-glare levels and types. Physically etched screens (versus chemical coatings) are typically the most effective at reducing glare but also cause the worst crystalline effect. Strong anti-glare has lost popularity, although it's probably the best choice for powerfully bright office lighting — like big overhead fluorescent systems — and when windows are shining onto the screen.

25) The most competitive higher-speed gaming panel has these features: strobing backlight, TN, 120 Hz or better, very low input lag (including with 120 Hz or better mode enabled), pixels overdriven "just enough" (not too much overshoot), and screen tearing reduction tech like FreeSync. Some also like tech that reduces the depth of dark areas but I don't see why that can't be done in the video card or CPU. The monitor that is geared at more generalized entertainment: no strobing backlight, 120 Hz with low input lag, a VA panel with 2700:1 or better contrast (ideally 5000:1 or so) — properly overdriven. TVs with VA panels are generally quoted as having higher static contrast than computer monitors. Perhaps this has changed since I last checked, though. It seems that the monitors, though, lagged behind in terms of the sophistication of the VA pixel tech. The exception was the Sharp panel in that old 1080 resolution Eizo I mentioned that could reach 5000:1.

26) If you use HDMI, remember to switch it to full RGB range mode, not limited. I think the full is 0–255 and the limited is 16–255, so you lose some of the deepest blacks with limited mode. As far as I know the limited mode is made for TV use. However, it can be turned on by default in computer setups!

27) Color enhancement boosts don't add information. In fact, like sharpeners, they tend to reduce the information presented on the screen. Similarly, fancy software shader add-ins may seem neat but they may just be reducing the information level by boosting color and crushing the gamma. If your panel seems to lack contrast you can cheat by raising the gamma to a higher number. This makes things look more contrasty but you're throwing away detail in the process. You can also get the "make dark areas lighter to see your enemy" tech, at least in a limited manner, by reducing your gamma's contrast. Linear 1.0 gamma is the most "washed out" gamma setting, typically. It looks bad but perhaps it will help you see people in shadows.

28) Contrast adjustments on monitors usually shouldn't be messed with because they're boosting the RGB channels. It's better to calibrate the RGB channels separately.

29) You can't trust the human eye to do calibration. It adjusts itself to accommodate what it sees. For instance, if you switch your white point to 1900K (candle level warmth) it will seem really orange for a while. But, give it time and the red/orange will steadily become less "there". Your brain/eye adjusts for the extra red. You must use a colorimeter and software that gives good-quality results. This is if you want color/gamma accuracy. Even if you're not doing color-critical work it's nice to, at least, not have banding. Most monitors do not come very well-calibrated from the factory, although standards seem to have been increasing, at least in the prosumer and better market.

30) The best color work monitors have a programmable hardware LUT (look-up table). This enables calibration with less loss of presented information. It's less lossy calibration. LUT profiles, though, from what I've read, are less supported, in terms of what software will recognize the profile correctly, that the simpler, and more lossy, matrix color profiles. Perhaps things have changed?

That's 30 points off of the top of my head. I'm sure I've forgotten some things but I think I remembered the important stuff.


Also, watch out for BenQ/AUO because they have created a name for their pixel type that says "VA" in it but it's actually a variety of IPS. I think it's "AHVA". Why they did this is a mystery. VA means vertical alignment and IPS pixels are not VA.

PLS is another variant of IPS.

A-MVA (the common version of actual VA in recent times) used to have a competitor from Samsung called c-PVA. It was a cost-reduced variety of the old PVA type. PVA had some good points but I think pixel speed was not one of them. It was also, as I recall, a bit costly to make. c-PVA was inferior to it because of strong black crush and Samsung apparently couldn't keep up with the improvements to A-MVA.
 
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#37
A good read and I actually read through it. A couple of points however, one rather important, the other just a nit.
OLED is likely to get burn-in or image retention if used as a computer screen
"Likely" to get burn in or image retention? Nah! Not for normal users.

Image retention (which is temporary) occurs when the same image is displayed for hours and hours on end and never changes. And burn in (which is permanent) occurs when that same image is displayed many hours every day, day after day. For example, at a sports bar that keeps their TV set to ESPN for hours every day, there is a good chance the ESPN logo displayed in the corner will burn in.

But most computer users don't display images like that. The backgrounds in games change, as do objects in the game. Users check email, look at facebook, call up their browsers and do other computing tasks that change the image, thus minimize, or even eliminate the risk of image retention.

So while image retention (and burn in) are potential problems with OLED displays, to say an OLED is "likely" to experience image retention or burn is overstating the problem and greatly exaggerating the potentials for them.

And the nitnoid issue:
You can't trust the human eye to do calibration. It adjusts itself to accommodate what it sees.
It is true you cannot trust the human eye to do calibration, but it is the human "brain" that does the adjusting (fooling actually), not the eye. The eye sees what it sees. The brain interprets, or tries to interpret based on what it thinks it should be seeing.
 

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#38
Image retention (which is temporary) occurs when the same image is displayed for hours and hours on end and never changes. And burn in (which is permanent) occurs when that same image is displayed many hours every day, day after day. For example, at a sports bar that keeps their TV set to ESPN for hours every day, there is a good chance the ESPN logo displayed in the corner will burn in.
Image retention on a plasma TV is a right pita, I tell you and possibly hastened plasma's demise.

I've got a 42 inch 2010 era Full HD Panasonic plasma TV I bought very cheaply off a friend a few months ago. Great picture as you can imagine. However, it does actually have a bit of light burn-in now from the Sky+ HD box it's connected to.

Every time I press play, rewind etc, it shows a largish blue square at the bottom left of the screen which has a thick circle animation inside it related to the function it's doing. This lasts for around 5 seconds or so. That has now left a faint after image on the screen that annoyingly won't go away. Thankfully it's mainly visible under very dark backgrounds or a white background, but it's still there. There are other faint burn-in marks on that screen too, which were there when I bought it.

To reduce the amount of further damage, I now press the Back Up button on the remote to get rid of that animation asap. LCDs are virtually immune to retention issues, which is something I really like about them (and regularly leave my PC showing the same picture on the monitor for ages with no issues at all) but I don't know how sensitive a good quality OLED TV would be to this problem.
 
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#39
Image retention on a plasma TV is a right pita,
My comment was specifically about OLED displays. Not plasmas.
 

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#40
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#41
I know that. I think you missed the context of my comment. Never mind.
I note you quoted my OLED comments! So to me, that set the context to OLED displays. I think you were barking up the wrong tree! ;)

But to your plasma comments, pretty sure there are no plasma "monitors". In fact, I am not aware there ever was. Only TVs and pretty sure no one is making them any more either.
 
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#42
Who's going to know if it should be this red or that red?
The 'red' on the left is closer to real red than the second one, the one on the right is a really dark/hot pink. :sigh: I actually want to get rid of this monitor.
 
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#43
IPS has more natural colors and comes with the highest procetag of all three types. It has horrible silverish tint on black and yellow glow on all dark colors. getting one with minimal blb is a struggle as well.
TN has worst colors of all three, but with a proper calibration they're still vibrant and saturated.

If you get a good one of any type - you'll be pleased. If you get a bad one, no matter if it's IPS or wahtever else, it's going to suck.

My choice for the IPS dell is dictated by the fact that I suspect a cheap IPS will suck less than a cheap TN or cheap VA. If you were talking triple-quadruple your budget, then a goodquality VA/TN might be better for gaming than an IPS.
 
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#44
I am pretty happy with my Asus PB258Q, it is a 1440P 25" IPS with 60 Hz. I have heard that you can overclock the refresh rate but I have not tried it. I think nowadays you should buy a higher Hz monitor than a 60 Hz but it will make your graphics card requirement more demanding. The colors are really beautiful on the IPS compared to the TN I use as a secondary monitor. One thing is running a 1440P on a smaller monitor (25") means that the pixel density is really high, so I don't need to run as much Anti-Aliasing at all. The pixels are so small it looks good even with 2X AA. If I were buying a new monitor, I would probably aim for a 27" IPS 1440P with 144 Hz. Maybe an Asus PG279Q (Nvidia G-Sync) or a MG278Q (AMD Free Sync). I have had good luck with Asus monitors.
 
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#45
A good read and I actually read through it. A couple of points however, one rather important, the other just a nit. "Likely" to get burn in or image retention? Nah! Not for normal users.
OLED's blue pixels are so weak that TV makers had to add a white subpixel to combat the premature death of the panels from fading blue. That is a big red flag for image retention and burn-in.

Image retention (which is temporary) occurs when the same image is displayed for hours and hours on end and never changes.
How about a minute or two? That's the kind of retention I've gotten from my plasma.

My comment was specifically about OLED displays. Not plasmas.
I have read innumerable claims that image retention (temporary and permanent) are vastly overblown concerns for plasma, too. I have a plasma and it has a bad time when used with a computer, even with moving content.

Yet, many Internet experts said it's not an issue. Perhaps my 2009 model isn't fully representative of the technology but LCD clearly has a strong advantage in terms of burn-in resistance. I assume that PWM screens are the best of all, in comparison with always-on constant control backlighting. I have seen aggressive screen dimming from an LG plasma so, perhaps, the way more recent plasma TVs made retention less of an issue was to simply lower the brightness of the screen dramatically. However, even with the contrast turned very low, my plasma still struggles with retention.

Plasma and OLED aren't the same but they share complaints from users about image retention.

And burn in (which is permanent) occurs when that same image is displayed many hours every day, day after day. For example, at a sports bar that keeps their TV set to ESPN for hours every day, there is a good chance the ESPN logo displayed in the corner will burn in.
I'm not sure why you lectured me about what image retention and burn-in are. I am fully familiar with what they are. However, your claims about how long it takes apply best to LCDs, which are the most resistant.

But most computer users don't display images like that. The backgrounds in games change, as do objects in the game. Users check email, look at facebook, call up their browsers and do other computing tasks that change the image, thus minimize, or even eliminate the risk of image retention.
People spend hours in content creation/editing programs like Photoshop and InDesign, where palettes don't move much. People spend hours in video games like Star Trek Online, which has (the last time I played it), a static UI. The difference between computer usage and television usage, in terms of image retention was extremely obvious when I tried to use my plasma as a computer display — mainly for playing video games.

So while image retention (and burn in) are potential problems with OLED displays, to say an OLED is "likely" to experience image retention or burn is overstating the problem and greatly exaggerating the potentials for them.
Are there pro monitors made with OLED on the market? If so, I'd be very interested to see how they have improved upon the technology, as there was a reason only TVs and phones were introduced with it before.

And the nitnoid issue:It is true you cannot trust the human eye to do calibration, but it is the human "brain" that does the adjusting (fooling actually), not the eye. The eye sees what it sees. The brain interprets, or tries to interpret based on what it thinks it should be seeing.
I talked about the brain compensating in my post. I used the word "eye" because it's common parlance. If I hadn't specifically mentioned the brain then it might be worth bringing up.

Update:

Well, I've checked into this and it looks like the burn-in concern for OLED is real. I had read complaints about it from multiple sources but this article has photographic evidence:

https://www.rtings.com/tv/learn/permanent-image-retention-burn-in-lcd-oled


Also, temporary image retention is apparently an issue with them, too:

  • IPS TVs: IPS TVs are the most common type of TV that suffer from image retention. Not all IPS TVs have the same degree of image retention though. See our table above for comparisons.
  • VA TVs: VA TVs are practically all free of image retention.
  • OLED TVs: OLED TVs are another type of TV that suffer from temporary image retention, and in some rare cases the image retention can be permanent. OLED image retention does not look the same as that seen on IPS TVs since the display technology is not the same.
I did learn something new, though: IPS is more vulnerable than VA, according to their testing. I wonder if the IPS screens may have had constant control backlighting and if that might have made a difference — of if it's the pixel technology itself that separates it from the VA results.

It may be that the bigger concern for OLED, for graphics work, though — is the fading of blue pixels. That would potentially necessitate frequent calibration and could result in a shrinking color gamut. If they're going to sell OLED for pro graphics use they'll need to beef up the size of the blue pixels, probably, instead of chasing the "great phantom pixel" beyond the limits of human visual acuity (for marketing purposes). Maybe I'm missing something, but it seems that the smaller the pixels are the lower their lifespan is likely to be. That was the reason given for plasma's demise. Apparently, it was too difficult to build 4K plasma sets with enough brightness + longevity. I suppose if they're excessively tiny they can use a backup pixel strategy, where fresher ones become active after a time. That, though, still presents the issue of panel brightness. If only half of the pixels are actually active then you're putting double the strain on the ones that are active while they're active. The chase for HDR extreme brightness is another problem for OLED lifespan. Large screens, like jumbo televisions, are easier to manage the problem with. However, cramming 8K into a 27" screen for marketing purposes...

4K isn't enough anymore, after all. We're being groomed to believe we really need 8K.

Perhaps some discovery has been made, but the last time I read about it, it was simply stated that blue OLED pixels are the technology's weak link. The work-around was the addition of the white subpixel. But, a white subpixel can't create blueness so gamut shrinkage may still be an issue.
 
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#46
That's the kind of retention I've gotten from my plasma.
:( This isn't about plasma's.
People spend hours in content creation/editing programs
People spend 30 seconds to check their email, 2 minutes to check facebook, then leave. So my exceptions to the norm cancels out yours. Makes sense, huh? :kookoo:

Exceptions don't make the rule.

And for the record, the better OLED TVs have built-in features just to minimize the risk further. LG calls theirs "Screen Shift", Sony's is Pixel Shift. They also have pixel refresher features that run periodically.

Are there pro monitors made with OLED on the market?
Not yet because OLEDs still cost too much to make. But as prices come down, there likely will be.

Your comment about Blue pixels is old news that makers have dealt with - just as they have with burn in and retention issues.

If you are going to run CNN 24/7/365, don't get an OLED. Otherwise, get one and love the image. Nothing else beats it.

And your rtings.com review? Come on! If you feed a rat 10 pounds of chocolate, 6 times a day, there's a good chance you can claim chocolate kills too.

How many computer users will be running the same test pattern in a continuous loop on any monitor 20 hours per day, 7 days a week?

https://www.cnet.com/news/oled-screen-burn-in-what-you-need-to-know/
All things considered, however, burn-in shouldn't be a problem for most people. That's why we at CNET continue to recommend OLED-based TVs, phones and other devices in our reviews. From all of the evidence we've seen, burn-in is typically caused by leaving a single, static image element, like a channel logo, on-screen for a very long time, repeatedly. That's an issue if you keep Fox News, ESPN or MSNBC on-screen for multiple hours every day and don't watch enough other programming, for example. But as long as you vary what's displayed, chances are you'll never experience burn-in.
 
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