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Which Prebuilt PC is best?

Gamer212

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Hey all,

Which gaming prebuilt pc is the best for games such as overwatch. Diablo 3, call of duty etc for around $1600 USD.

https://www.bestbuy.com/site/cyberp...tx-3070-1tb-ssd-white/6434646.p?skuId=6434646






If you recommend something better, please let me know.
 
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The 3700x has a better upgrade path and is cheaper... go for that if you're going to upgrade to a 5800/5900.

10700K if you're just going to keep it as is otherwise as it's faster than the 3700x in games -- the 3070 is the best buy here, doesn't really matter much what proc. The 5600x and 3060ti is overpriced as is the 3060 (not a great card tbh)
 

Gamer212

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The 3700x has a better upgrade path and is cheaper... go for that if you're going to upgrade to a 5800/5900.

10700K if you're just going to keep it as is otherwise as it's faster than the 3700x in games -- the 3070 is the best buy here, doesn't really matter much what proc. The 5600x and 3060ti is overpriced as is the 3060 (not a great card tbh)
Thanks!
 
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I agree with phanbuey, the first one you listed is probably the best one for the money.

Hell, in this day and age, you could probably make a buck if you part out that system.
 
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at the end of the day either machine you choose is great for gaming,
heres my two cents - with best buy you dont know what brand and model hardware you are getting in the machine.
they might shove in say a 650w silver rated psu, but you dont know the make and model of it. Its a bit risky in my opinion
for example the maingear one you listed said 500w psu and thats it.
you can also do a prebuilt gaming machine with NZXT and they will tell you which parts are going in.
 

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I would take the Maingear PC over Ibuypower or Cyberpower just on reputation.



 
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If you don't want to build your own (and there nothing wrong with not wanting to), then I would recommend researching local shops to see if they will custom build one for you. In that way, you have a say in which components are used, based on what you want and what suits your needs best. A local custom build also ensures full ATX Form Factor compatibility which totally avoids proprietary parts so often used in factory built systems. That to me is critical. Being 100% ATX compliant ensures you have the widest possible upgrade flexibility and options for many years to come.

Plus having a tech in a local shop you can talk to face-to-face with, one that knows your system, is a major plus, should you need help or advice down the road.

Yes, you typically pay a little more. The big factory assemblers can promise ASUS and Micron, for example, to buy 1,000,000 motherboards and RAM sticks over the next year so they can demand and get deep volume discounts. Small shops and self-builders cannot. But IMO, you get a better computer designed specifically for you, and not 999,999 people supposedly just like you. :rolleyes:

Plus, in those examples you provided above, what if you don't like that mouse and keyboard? You are stuck paying for them anyway, and still have to buy different ones. Or what if you already have a mouse and keyboard you like and want to use?

Most of the better shops will let you (and often help and advise you) get your own components, then for a nominal fee ($100 - $150, depending on build, is pretty typical), assemble the computer and install the OS and test everything for you.
 
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