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NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Released: TU117, 896 Cores, 4 GB GDDR5, $150

NVIDIA today rolled out the GeForce GTX 1650 graphics card at USD $149.99. Like its other GeForce GTX 16-series siblings, the GTX 1650 is derived from the "Turing" architecture, but without RTX real-time raytracing hardware, such as RT cores or tensor cores. The GTX 1650 is based on the 12 nm "TU117" silicon, which is the smallest implementation of "Turing." Measuring 200 mm² (die area), the TU117 crams 4.7 billion transistors. It is equipped with 896 CUDA cores, 56 TMUs, 32 ROPs, and a 128-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, holding 4 GB of memory clocked at 8 Gbps (128 GB/s bandwidth). The GPU is clocked at 1485 MHz, and the GPU Boost at 1665 MHz.

The GeForce GTX 1650 at its given price is positioned competitively with the Radeon RX 570 4 GB from AMD. NVIDIA has been surprisingly low-key about this launch, by not just leaving it up to the partners to drive the launch, but also sample reviewers. There are no pre-launch Reviewer drivers provided by NVIDIA, and hence we don't have a launch-day review for you yet. We do have GTX 1650 graphics cards, namely the Palit GTX 1650 StormX, MSI GTX 1650 Gaming X, and ASUS ROG GTX 1650 Strix OC.

Update: Catch our reviews of the ASUS ROG Strix GTX 1650 OC and MSI GTX 1650 Gaming X

AMD Ryzen 3 3200G Pictured and De-lidded

AMD Ryzen 3 3200G is an upcoming processor featuring integrated graphics, forming the tail-end of the company's 3rd generation Ryzen desktop processor family. A Chinese PC enthusiast with access to an early sample pictured and de-lidded the processor. We know from older posts that while the "Matisse" MCM will form the bulk of AMD's 3rd gen Ryzen lineup, with core counts ranging all the way from 6 to 12, and possibly 16 later, the APU lineup is rumored to be based on older "Zen+" architecture.

The Ryzen 3 3200G and possibly the Ryzen 5 3400G, will be based on a derivative of the "Raven Ridge" silicon built on the 12 nm process at GlobalFoundries, and comes with a handful innovations AMD introduced with "Pinnacle Ridge," such as an improved Precision Boost algorithm and faster on-die caches. The 12 nm shrink also allows AMD to dial up CPU and iGPU engine clock speeds, and improve DDR4 memory support to work with higher DRAM clock speeds. AMD has used thermal paste as the sub-IHS interface material instead of solder for its "Raven Ridge" chips, and the story repeats with the 3200G.

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Specifications and Price Revealed

NVIDIA is releasing its most affordable graphics card based on the "Turing" architecture, the GeForce GTX 1650, on the 23rd of April, starting at USD $149. There doesn't appear to be a reference-design (the GTX 1660 series lacked one, too), and so this GPU will be a partner-driven launch. Based on NVIDIA's smallest "Turing" silicon, the 12 nm "TU117," the GTX 1650 will pack 896 CUDA cores and will feature 4 GB of GDDR5 memory across a 128-bit wide memory interface.

The GPU is clocked at 1485 MHz with 1665 MHz GPU Boost, and the 8 Gbps memory produces 128 GB/s of memory bandwidth. With a TDP of just 75 Watts, most GTX 1650 cards will lack additional PCIe power inputs, relying entirely on the slot for power. Most entry-level implementations of the GTX 1650 feature very simple aluminium fan-heatsink coolers. VideoCardz compiled a number of leaked pictures of upcoming GTX 1650 graphics cards.

AMD Readies 50th Anniversary Special Edition Ryzen 7 2700X

AMD is celebrating its 50th Anniversary with a new commemorative special edition package of the Ryzen 7 2700X eight-core desktop processor. This package carries the PIB SKU number "YD270XBGAFA50." American online retailer ShopBLT had it listed for USD $340.95 before pulling the listing down and marking it "out of stock." The listing doesn't come with any pictures or details about the SKU, except mentioning that a Wraith Prism RGB CPU cooler is included (as it normally is for the 2700X PIB package).

Given that AMD hasn't changed the model number, we expect these processors to have the same specifications as regular Ryzen 7 2700X, but with some special packaging material, and perhaps some special laser engraving on the processor's IHS. AMD has used tin boxes in the past for its first FX-series processors, so the possibility of something similar cannot be ruled out. Since pricing of this SKU isn't significantly higher, we don't expect it to be of a higher bin (better overclockers) than regular 2700X chips. Based on the 12 nm "Pinnacle Ridge" silicon, the 2700X is an 8-core/16-thread processor derived from the "Zen+" architecture, with 3.70 GHz clock-speed, 4.30 GHz maximum Precision Boost, XFR, L2 cache of 512 KB per core, and 16 MB of shared L3 cache.

NVIDIA RTX Logic Increases TPC Area by 22% Compared to Non-RTX Turing

Public perception on NVIDIA's new RTX series of graphics cards was sometimes marred by an impression of wrong resource allocation from NVIDIA. The argument went that NVIDIA had greatly increased chip area by adding RTX functionality (in both its Tensor ad RT cores) that could have been better used for increased performance gains in shader-based, non-raytracing workloads. While the merits of ray tracing oas it stands (in terms of uptake from developers) are certainly worthy of discussion, it seems that NVIDIA didn't dedicate that much more die area to their RTX functionality - at least not to the tone of public perception.

After analyzing full, high-res images of NVIDIA's TU106 and TU116 chips, reddit user @Qesa did some analysis on the TPC structure of NVIDIA's Turing chips, and arrived at the conclusion that the difference between NVIDIA's RTX-capable TU106 compared to their RTX-stripped TU116 amounts to a mere 1.95 mm² of additional logic per TPC - a 22% area increase. Of these, 1.25 mm² are reserved for the Tensor logic (which accelerates both DLSS and de-noising on ray-traced workloads), while only 0.7 mm² are being used for the RT cores.

AMD Announces 2nd Gen Ryzen PRO Mobile and Athlon PRO Mobile Processor Series

Today, AMD announced the latest additions to its PRO processor lineup: 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen PRO mobile processors with Radeon Vega Graphics and AMD Athlon PRO mobile processors with Radeon Vega Graphics. Providing commercial notebook users with power-efficient performance, state-of-the-art security features, and commercial-grade reliability and manageability, these new processors enable global PC manufacturers to create a wide range of business systems, from premium professional notebooks to everyday productivity notebooks. Initial commercial systems from HP and Lenovo are expected this quarter with other OEMs and further platform updates anticipated later in 2019.

"Modern PC users expect the experience between professional and personal to be imperceptible, and business notebook users want to utilize the latest modern features including 3D modeling, video editing, multi-display setups while multitasking securely, to get more done," said Saeid Moshkelani, senior vice president and general manager, Client Compute, AMD. "With AMD Ryzen PRO and Athlon PRO mobile processors, AMD delivers the right performance, features, and choice to OEMs and commercial users, combined with the productivity, protection, and professional features needed to ensure seamless deployment throughout an organization."

AMD "Cato" SoCs Figure in Futuremark SystemInfo

AMD could be giving finishing touches to its new generation of embedded SoCs codenamed "Cato." The chips surfaced on screenshots of UL Benchmarks (Futuremark) SystemInfo, across three models: the RX-8125, the RX-8120, and the A9-9820. For the uninitiated, the RX series embedded processors are part of the company's Ryzen Embedded family. The RX-series are differentiated from the A-series either by microarchitecture, or lack of unlocked multipliers, or other features, such as integrated graphics.

"Cato" is shrouded in mystery. One possible explanation could be AMD manufacturing the existing "Raven Ridge" IP on its refined 12 nm process, and "Zen+" enhancements to its CPUs. SystemInfo reading 8 logical processors could be a case of a 4-core/8-thread CPU configuration with SMT enabled. Another theory pegs this to be a new silicon, based on new IP, and 8 CPU cores. This is less probable since AMD is less stingy with SMT across its product-stack, and is hence less likely to deprive an 8-core silicon of SMT. If the latter theory is true, then this could simply be a case of the SystemInfo module not correctly detecting the prototype chips.

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Availability Revealed

NVIDIA is expected to launch its sub-$200 GeForce GTX 1650 graphics card on the 22nd of April, 2019. The card was earlier expected to launch towards the end of April. With it, NVIDIA will introduce the 12 nm "TU117," its smallest GPU based on the "Turing" architecture. The GTX 1650 could replace the current GTX 1060 3 GB, and may compete with AMD offerings in this segment, such as the Radeon RX 570 4 GB, in being Full HD-capable if not letting you max your game settings out at that resolution. The card could ship with 4 GB of GDDR5 memory.

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Details Leak Thanks to EEC Filing

The GeForce GTX 1650 will be NVIDIA's smallest "Turing" based graphics card, and is slated for a late-April launch as NVIDIA waits on inventories of sub-$200 "Pascal" based graphics cards, such as the GTX 1050 series, to be digested by the retail channel. A Eurasian Economic Commission filing revealed many more details of this card, as an MSI Gaming X custom-design board was finding its way through the regulator. The filing confirms that the GTX 1650 will pack 4 GB of memory. The GPU will be based on the new 12 nm "TU117" silicon, which will be NVIDIA's smallest based on the "Turing" architecture. This card will likely target e-Sports gamers, giving them the ability to max out their online battle royale titles at 1080p. It will probably compete with AMD's Radeon RX 570.

NVIDIA Launches the GeForce GTX 1660 6GB Graphics Card

NVIDIA today launched the GeForce GTX 1660 6 GB graphics card, its successor to the immensely popular GTX 1060 6 GB. With prices starting at $219.99, the GTX 1660 is based on the same 12 nm "TU116" silicon as the GTX 1660 Ti launched last month; with fewer CUDA cores and a slower memory interface. NVIDIA carved the GTX 1660 out by disabling 2 out of 24 "Turing" SMs on the TU116, resulting in 1,408 CUDA cores, 88 TMUs, and 48 ROPs. The company is using 8 Gbps GDDR5 memory instead of 12 Gbps GDDR6, which makes its memory sub-system 33 percent slower. The GPU is clocked at 1530 MHz, with 1785 MHz boost, which are marginally higher than the GTX 1660 Ti. The GeForce GTX 1660 is a partner-driven launch, meaning that there won't be any reference-design cards, although NVIDIA made should every AIC partner has at least one product selling at the baseline price of $219.99.

Read TechPowerUp Reviews: Zotac GeForce GTX 1660 | EVGA GeForce GTX 1660 XC Ultra | Palit GeForce GTX 1660 StormX OC | MSI GTX 1660 Gaming X

Update: We have updated our GPU database with all GTX 1660 models announced today, so you can easily get an overview over what has been released.

EVGA and GIGABYTE GeForce GTX 1660 Graphics Cards Pictured

Here are some of the first pictures of EVGA's and GIGABYTE's upcoming GeForce GTX 1660 graphics cards reportedly slated for launch later this week. It should come as no surprise that these cards resemble the companies' GTX 1660 Ti offerings, since they're based on the same 12 nm "TU116" silicon, with fewer CUDA cores. The underlying PCBs could be slightly different as the GTX 1660 uses older generation 8 Gbps GDDR5 memory instead of 12 Gbps GDDR6. The "TU116" silicon is configured with 1,408 CUDA cores out of the 1,536 physically present; the memory amount is 6 GB, across a 192-bit wide memory bus. The GTX 1660 baseline price is reportedly USD $219, and the card replaces the GTX 1060 6 GB from NVIDIA's product stack.

EVGA is bringing two designs to the market, a short-length triple-slot card with a single fan; and a more conventional longer card with 2-slot, dual-fan design. The baseline "Black" card could be offered in the shorter design; while the top-tier XC Ultra could be exclusive to the longer design. GIGABYTE, on the other hand, has two designs, a shorter-length dual-fan; and a longer-length triple-fan. Both models are dual-slot. The baseline SKU will be restricted to the shorter board design, while premium Gaming OC SKUs could come in the longer board design.

GIGABYTE Rolls Out its Radeon RX 590 Gaming Graphics Card

That took a little while, but GIGABYTE has finally updated their lineup with an AMD RX 590 graphics card. Based on the 12 nm-revised Polaris 30 silicon with higher clocks than those that could be achieved by its 14 nm predecessors (already the RX 480 and RX 580 graphics cards), the GIGABYTE RX 590 Gaming rbings the already well-known 2304 Stream processors, and gets them to tick at 1560 MHz (against AMD's 1545 MHz reference). It's a usual GIGABYTE graphics card by all standards, with a dual-fan WindForce 2X cooling solution with fan-stop functionality.

It seems GIGABYTE finally went through some of that unsold RX inventory, and is now looking to keep the channel supplied until the next best thing from the red team makes its appearance (hopefully sooner rather than later.)

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 and GTX 1650 Pricing and Availability Revealed

(Update 1: Andreas Schilling, at Hardware Luxx, seems to have obtained confirmation that NVIDIA's GTX 1650 graphics cards will pack 4 GB of GDDR5 memory, and that the GTX 1660 will be offering a 6 GB GDDR5 framebuffer.)

NVIDIA recently launched its GeForce GTX 1660 Ti graphics card at USD $279, which is the most affordable desktop discrete graphics card based on the "Turing" architecture thus far. NVIDIA's GeForce 16-series GPUs are based on 12 nm "Turing" chips, but lack RTX real-time ray-tracing and tensor cores that accelerate AI. The company is making two affordable additions to the GTX 16-series in March and April, according to Taiwan-based PC industry observer DigiTimes.

The GTX 1660 Ti launch will be followed by that of the GeForce GTX 1660 (non-Ti) on 15th March, 2019. This SKU is likely based on the same "TU116" silicon as the GTX 1660 Ti, but with fewer CUDA cores and possibly slower memory or lesser memory amount. NVIDIA is pricing the GTX 1660 at $229.99, a whole $50 cheaper than the GTX 1660 Ti. That's not all. We recently reported on the GeForce GTX 1650, which could quite possibly become NVIDIA's smallest "Turing" based desktop GPU. This product is real, and is bound for 30th April, at $179.99, $50 cheaper still than the GTX 1660. This SKU is expected to be based on the smaller "TU117" silicon. Much like the GTX 1660 Ti, these two launches could be entirely partner-driven, with the lack of reference-design cards.

NVIDIA Unveils the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6GB Graphics Card

NVIDIA today unveiled the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti graphics card, which is part of its new GeForce GTX 16-series product lineup based on the "Turing" architecture. These cards feature CUDA cores from the "Turing" generation, but lack RTX real-time raytracing features due to a physical lack of RT cores, and additionally lack tensor cores, losing out on DLSS. What you get instead with the GTX 1660 Ti is a upper-mainstream product that could play most eSports titles at resolutions of up to 1440p, and AAA titles at 1080p with details maxed out.

The GTX 1660 Ti is based on the new 12 nm "TU116" silicon, and packs 1,536 "Turing" CUDA cores, 96 TMUs, 48 ROPs, and a 192-bit wide memory interface holding 6 GB of GDDR6 memory. The memory is clocked at 12 Gbps, yielding 288 GB/s of memory bandwidth. The launch is exclusively partner-driven, and NVIDIA doesn't have a Founders Edition product based on this chip. You will find custom-design cards priced anywhere between USD $279 to $340.

We thoroughly reviewed four GTX 1660 Ti variants today: MSI GTX 1660 Ti Gaming X, EVGA GTX 1660 Ti XC Black, Zotac GTX 1660 Ti, MSI GTX 1660 Ti Ventus XS.

Gainward Announces its GeForce GTX 1660 Ti Series

As the leading brand in enthusiastic graphics market, Gainward proudly presents the all new GeForce GTX 1660 Ti series - Gainward GeForce GTX 1660 Ti Ghost and Gainward GeForce GTX 1660 Ti Pegasus series. Gainward's new GeForce GTX 1660 Ti series is built with the breakthrough graphics performance of the award-winning NVIDIA Turing architecture. These advanced graphics cards are designed to deliver a powerful combination of gaming innovation and next-gen graphics. With the new Turing's architecture, the gaming performance will outgo up to 1.5 times than the GeForce GTX 1060 6GB. It's a blazing-fast supercharger for today's most popular games, and even faster with modern titles.

NVIDIA Readies GeForce GTX 1650 for March Release

In a hurry to mop up its product stack, NVIDIA is giving finishing touches to the new GeForce GTX 1650 lower-mainstream graphics card, with an intention to release sometime this March. The card is rumored to be based on NVIDIA's smallest "Turing" chip, the 12 nm "TU117." NVIDIA will use the GTX 1650 to capture key sub-$200 price-points where its "Pascal" based GTX 1050 and GTX 1060 3 GB find themselves embattled against AMD's Radeon RX 570 and RX 580 4 GB, which have undergone major price-cuts.

The GeForce GTX 1650 is rumored to feature anywhere between 896 to 1,024 CUDA cores based on the "Turing" architecture, and most likely a 128-bit wide memory interface holding 4 GB of memory. According to TUM_APISAK, its core clock speed is set to 1485 MHz. With its TDP expected to be around 75 Watts, the card will either completely lack power connectors, or feature a single 6-pin PCIe power connector in some custom-design cards.

Tight Squeeze Below $350 as Price of GTX 1660 Ti Revealed

NVIDIA is reportedly pricing the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti at USD $279 (baseline pricing), which implies pricing of custom-designed and factory-overclocked cards scraping the $300-mark. The card is also spaced $70 apart from the RTX 2060, which offers not just 25% more CUDA cores, but also NVIDIA RTX and DLSS technologies. In media reporting of the card so far, it is being compared extensively to the GTX 1060 6 GB, which continues to go for under $230. Perhaps NVIDIA is planning a slower non-Ti version to replace the GTX 1060 6 GB under the $250-mark. That entry would place three SKUs within $50-70 of each other, a tight squeeze. Based on the 12 nm TU116 silicon, the GTX 1660 Ti is rumored to feature 1,536 CUDA cores, 96 TMUs, 48 ROPs, and a 192-bit wide GDDR6 memory interface, handling 6 GB of memory at 12 Gbps (288 GB/s). This GPU lacks RT cores.

NVIDIA TU116 GPU Pictured Up Close: Noticeably Smaller than TU106

Here is the first picture of NVIDIA's 12 nm "TU116" silicon, which powers the upcoming GeForce GTX 1660 Ti graphics card. While the size of the package itself is identical to that of the "TU106" on which the RTX 2060 and RTX 2070 are based; the die of the TU116 is visibly smaller. This is because the chip physically lacks RT cores, and only has two-thirds the number of CUDA cores as the TU106, with 1,536 against the latter's 2,304. The die area, too, is about 2/3rds that of the TU106. The ASIC version of TU116 powering the GTX 1660 Ti is "TU116-400-A1."

VideoCardz scored not just pictures of the ASIC, but also the PCB of an MSI GTX 1660 Ti Ventus graphics card, which reveals something very interesting. The PCB has traces for eight memory chips, across a 256-bit wide memory bus, although only six of them are populated with memory chips, making up 6 GB over a 192-bit bus. The GPU's package substrate, too, is of the same size. It's likely that NVIDIA is using a common substrate, with an identical pin-map between the TU106 and TU116, so AIC partners could reduce PCB development costs.

Palit and EVGA GeForce GTX 1660 Ti Cards Pictured

As we inch closer to the supposed 15th February launch of the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti, pictures of more AIC partner branded custom-design cards. The first two of these are from Palit and EVGA. Palit is bringing two very compact cards to the table under its StormX banner. These cards appear to be under 18 cm in length, and use an aluminium fin-stack cooler that's ventilated by a single 100 mm fan. There are two grades based on factory-overclock. The base model ticks at 1770 MHz boost, while the OC variant offers 1815 MHz boost.

EVGA's GTX 1660 Ti lineup includes two cards under its XC brand, with both cards being under 20 cm in length, but are 3 slots thick. Both cards appear to be using the same 3-slot single-fan cooling solution as the company's RTX 2060 XC. Once again, we see two variants based on clock-speeds, with the "Black" variant sticking to 1770 MHz boost, and the XC version slightly dialing up that frequency. Based on the 12 nm "TU116" silicon, the GTX 1660 Ti is rumored to feature 1,536 CUDA cores based on the "Turing" architecture, but lacking in RTX technology. The SKU succeeds the GTX 1060 6 GB.

MSI Announces, Releases Its RX 590 Armor Graphics Card

This should be old news by now, but it actually isn't: MSI is just now releasing their iteration of the AMD Radeon RX 590 SKU. Perhaps the company decided that the product wasn't too differentiated from the previous RX 480 and RX 580 graphics cards so as to justify all the resources they'd have to pour through to its development; or they wanted to first sell through their RX 580 inventory, and have now struck a good balance with stocks of the old and the new.

Whatever the reason, the fact is that MSI's first RX 590, launched in the Armor series - it isn't even in the gaming X department - has been released, three months later, in two variants: Armor and Armor OC (the latter is running a paltry 20 MHz higher than the non-OC version, so). The 12 nm, Polaris 30 XT graphics card draws power from an 8-pin connector, and video outputs include 2x DisplayPort, 2x HDMI, and 1x DVI. It's a dual-slot affair, like almost all MSI graphics cards, and all Armor ones. No word as of yet on availability nor pricing.

GIGABYTE Outs GeForce RTX 2070 Gaming OC White Graphics Card

GIGABYTE extended its all-white trim to its third graphics card from the RTX 20-series, the RTX 2070 Gaming OC White (model: GV-N2070GAMINGOC WHITE-8GC). This follows similar trims for the RTX 2060 Gaming OC Pro White and RTX 2070 Gaming OC Pro White. As with the others, the card's USP is its mostly-white cooler shroud with chrome inserts, and a matching white metal back-plate. Contrasting them are a trio of 90 mm matte-black fans with chrome hub stickers, and the black PCB carried over from the original Gaming OC series.

As with the RTX 2070 Gaming OC, this card offers a factory-overclock of 1725 MHz boost, compared to 1620 MHz reference. The memory is untouched at 14 Gbps (GDDR6-effective). The cooler offers 0 dBA mode (idle fan-stop). The card draws power from a combination of 8-pin and 6-pin PCIe power connectors. Display outputs include three DisplayPort 1.4, one HDMI 2.0b, and a USB-C VirtualLink. Based on the 12 nm "TU106" silicon, the GeForce RTX 2070 offers 2,304 CUDA cores, 288 tensor cores, 36 RT cores, 144 TMUs, 64 ROPs, and a 256-bit wide GDDR6 memory interface, holding 8 GB of memory. GIGABYTE is offering a unique 4-year warranty with this card, if you register your purchase with them.

AMD Updates Wafer Supply Agreement with GlobalFoundries to Free Itself of "7nm Tax"

AMD in its Q4-2018 Earnings Report disclosed that it has amended its Wafer Supply Agreement (WSA) with GlobalFoundries that frees it from paying a "7 nanometer tax." Under the older version of WSA, AMD would have had to pay a penalty to GlobalFoundries if it sourced processors from any other semiconductor foundry. The company got preferential pricing in return for the exclusivity. With GlobalFoundries discontinuing development of cutting-edge processes such as 7 nm and 5 nm, it makes sense for AMD to seek out other foundry partners, such as TSMC, and an amendment to the WSA was needed. With this amendment in place, AMD can go ahead and source 7 nm dies from TSMC without paying penalties to GlobalFoundries (GloFo).

With its "Zen 2" microarchitecture, AMD is going big on multi-chip modules, in which only those components that can tangibly benefit from the switch to the 7 nm node, namely the CPU cores, would be built on 7 nm dies, called "CPU chiplets," while components that don't need the miniaturization just yet, such as the processor's memory controller, PCIe root-complex, etc., will be built on separate dies called "I/O controllers." These dies will continue to be 14 nm, and likely supplied by GloFo. Final packaging of 7 nm CPU chiplets from TSMC, and 14 nm I/O controllers from GloFo, will happen at GloFo's facilities in China or Malaysia. AMD in its amendment committed to purchasing 14 nm and 12 nm chips from GloFo between 2019 and 2021, which means the MCM approach to processors is here to stay.

TSMC Fab 14 B Hit With Chemical Contamination; NVIDIA, MEDIATEK, Huawei, Hisilicon Lines Affected

TSMC's Fab 14 B has been affected with a chemical contamination that has put a considerable number of wafers in suspend mode. Fab 14 B essentially produces 12 and 16 nm, 300 mm wafers for 14 companies, including NVIDIA, MEDIATEK, Huawei and Hisilicon. Reportedly, between 10,000 and 30,000 wafers have been affected (though not scrapped, so there might be salvageable bits and pieces here and there). Of course, every wafer will have to go through a thorough certification process, and the fab will have to go down for the company to purge any remains of these botched chemical compounds.

To put things into perspective, though, Fab 14 B is one of TSMC's Gigafabs, which have a rated monthly output of 100k wafers - so production worth between three and ten days could be affected already, with the additional downtime accruing lost potential fabrication. This event isn't expected to significantly affect availability of any of the products for any of the companies, but these are becoming, at the very least, late inventory - this could well play into some speculative increases in pricing from some players in the market.

NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang on Radeon VII: "Underwhelming (...) the Performance is Lousy"; "Freesync Doesn't Work"

PC World managed to get a hold of NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang, picking his thoughts on AMD's recently announced Radeon VII. Skirting through the usual amicable, politically correct answers, Jensen made his thoughts clear on what the competition is offering to compete with NVIDIA's RTX 2000 series. The answer? Vega VII is an "underwhelming product", because "The performance is lousy and there's nothing new. [There's] no ray tracing, no AI. It's 7nm with HBM memory that barely keeps up with a 2080. And if we turn on DLSS we'll crush it. And if we turn on ray tracing we'll crush it." Not content on dissing the competition's product, Jensen Huang also quipped regarding AMD's presentation and product strategy, saying that "It's a weird launch, maybe they thought of it this morning."

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 Could Launch Mid-January

NVIDIA could launch its "RTX for the masses" SKU, the GeForce RTX 2060, sometime mid-January, according to Andreas Schilling. It is also confirmed that the RTX 2060 will feature 6 GB of GDDR6 memory. Schilling confirmed no other specifications of the GPU, but posted official branding for the RTX 2060 SKU. Earlier leaks pin the RTX 2060 as being carved out from the 12 nm "TU106" silicon, with 1,920 CUDA cores, 120 TMUs, 48 ROPs, and a 192-bit wide GDDR6 memory interface, which at 14 Gbps produces a memory bandwidth of 336 GB/s. NVIDIA could target the crowd that wants DXR-enabled gaming at 1080p thru 1440p resolutions.
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