News Posts matching "144 Hz"

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Lenovo to Update Legion Y530 with GeForce GTX 1160

Lenovo is mincing no words to talk about NVIDIA's upcoming GeForce 11-series graphics processors being part of its future GPU options for desktops and notebooks. LaptopMedia reports that the company is planning to make the mid-range GeForce GTX 1160 an option for its Legion Y530 15-inch gaming notebook. It features a 15.6-inch IPS display with Full HD (1920 x 1080 pixels) resolution, and a 144 Hz option for this display. Back to the GTX 1160, and LaptopMedia seems to confirm that the GPU will feature 6 GB of dedicated memory. If NVIDIA is doubling memory with this generation, this could indicate 6 GB to be a successor to the GTX 1060 3 GB; and the likelihood of a better endowed 12 GB GTX 1160 to succeed the GTX 1060 6 GB. It could be an action-packed 2H-2018 for PC graphics.

Philips Launches Momentum 436M6VBPAB Monitor: 4K, Display HDR 1000, Active Sync

Remember that awe-inspiring 4K monitor from Philips - the one with Ambiglow and that earned the world's first HDR 1000 monitor certification? It's up for grabs as we speak in multiple markets, and pricing is somewhat lower than predicted - a rare, momentous occasion (see that?). The Momentum 436M6VBPAB monitor packs an 8 bit + FRC 43" MVA panel affair that supports 4K resolution, features true Display HDR with 1000 maximum nits brightness, and also features AMD's FreeSync specification up to 80 Hz (overclocked) from its 60 Hz base frequency (minimum refresh rate is unknown, as is unclear whether it supports LFC). Additionally, the monitor features Quantum Dot technology to increase its color range (97.6% of the DCI-P3 color gamut as well as 100% of the sRGB color range)

What's more impressive though, is that Philips' Momentum monitor doesn't seem to be using local dimming to achieve its 1000 nits flash maximum brightness (required for HDR 1000 certification, with a baseline full-screen 600 nits for continuous content). Instead, Philips is apparently employing a 32-zone edge-lit solution. This is without a doubt one of the reasons this panel manages to undercut NVIDIA's 144 Hz, 4K panels, which use a 384-zone local dimming panel (besides the added G-Sync module royalties, of course). The Philips Momentum is available mostly through Amazon, and carries a €799 MSRP, which translates to around $1000 in the US.

NVIDIA G-Sync HDR Module Adds $500 to Monitor Pricing

PCPer had the opportunity to disassemble the ASUS ROG Swift PG27UQ 27", a 4K 144 Hz G-Sync HDR Monitor and found that the G-Sync module is a newer version than the one used on 1st generation G-Sync monitors (which of course do not support 4K / 144 Hz / HDR). The module is powered by an FPGA made by Altera (Intel-owned since 2015). The exact model number is Arria 10 GX 480, which is a high-performance 20 nanometer SoC that provides enough bandwidth and LVDS pins to process the data stream.

The FPGA is sold in low quantities for $2000 at Digikey and Mouser. Assuming that NVIDIA buys thousands, PCPer suggests that the price of this chip alone will add $500 to monitor cost. The BOM cost is further increased by 3 GB of DDR4 memory on the module. With added licensing fees for G-SYNC, this explains why these monitors are so expensive.

ASUS Gets First Dibs On 144 Hz/3 ms Narrow-Bezel Panels from AU Optronics

ASUS's upcoming ROG GL504 Scar II, Hero II, and Zephyrus GM501 gaming laptops have one thing in common - 144 Hz/3 ms narrow-bezel panels. A source within the company confirmed that ASUS had partnered with AU Optronics to produce the new panel exclusively for its gaming laptops. The Taiwanese manufacturer even funded a portion of the panel's research and development. As a result, ASUS has exclusive rights to the 144 Hz/ 3 ms panel for at least a year. Gaming laptop competitors such as Gigabyte and MSI will have to wait it out or look elsewhere.

Certainly there are many display panel manufacturers in the likes of BOE Display, LG Philips, Samsung, and Sharp. Unfortunately, they don't offer a panel that is able to rival the 144 Hz/ 3 ms panel from AU Optronics, which is already in mass production. Consumers who aren't after a gaming laptop with a 144 Hz/ 3 ms panel have other viable options. The current offering on the market includes the MSI GS65 and Gigabyte Aero 15X that feature a 144 Hz panel with a slightly higher response time of 7 ms. And there's also the MSI GS63VR that comes with a 120 Hz/ 3 ms panel.

Latest 4K 144 Hz Monitors use Blurry Chroma Subsampling

Just a while ago the first 4K 144 Hz monitors became available with the ASUS PG27UQ and Acer X27. These $2,000 monitors no longer force gamers to pick between high-refresh rate or high resolution, since they support 3840x2160 and refresh rates up to 144 Hz. However, reviews of early-adopters report a noticeable degradation in image quality when these monitors are running at 144 Hz. Surprisingly refresh rates of 120 Hz and below look perfectly sharp.
The underlying reason for that is the DisplayPort 1.4 interface, which provides 26 Gbits/s of bandwidth, just enough for full 4K at 120 Hz. So monitor vendors had to get creative to achieve the magic 144 Hz that they were shooting for. The solution comes from old television technology in form of chroma subsampling (YCbCr), which, in the case of these monitors, transmits the grayscale portion of the image at full resolution (3840x2160) and the color information at half the horizontal resolution (1920x2160).

AOC Announces C24G1, C27G1, and C32G1 Curved Monitors

Display specialist AOC announces the G1 Series, with three new curved models C24G1, C27G1 and C32G1 ranging from 23.6" to 27" and 31.5" screen sizes. The red-accented design and aggressive curvatures (1500R to 1800R) assure an excellent, immersive gaming experience. The new series is equipped with VA panels and supports Full HD (1920 x 1080 pixels) resolution. Aimed at competitive gamers, these monitors deliver high contrast images with deep blacks and vivid colors with 144 Hz refresh rate, 1 ms MPRT (Moving Picture Response Time) response time, and wide viewing angles of 178°/178°.

For the smoothest gaming experience, these monitors boast AMD FreeSync support for stutter and tear-free gaming, Low Input Lag for the fastest visual feedback, AOC Game Color for on-the-fly adjustment of saturation and picture detail as well as the brand new "Dial Point" for a crosshair overlay, helping gamers to aim accurately in FPS games. Gamers no longer need to choose between elegant designs, fast panels, accurate colors and curvature for better immersion. With the new AOC G1 Series, all these features and design come together.

AOC Announces Availability of G2590FX Monitor: 24.5" 1080p TN, 144 Hz Freesync, 1 ms

AOC today announced availability of their budget-conscious G2590FX, their latest addition to the G90 series of monitors (and an improvement to their 6-month old G2590VXQ). The G2590FX has been developed with the budget-conscious gamer in mind. The usage of a TN panel keeps costs lower than other panel options would allow. At the same time, AOC looked towards offering high-quality gaming specs - such as the 1 ms response time, and the 144 Hz panel refresh rate with AMD Freesync support - to allow twitch-players to stay competitive. The 1080p resolution can almost be seen as a bonus, as it ensures the likelihood of users' graphics processing hardware to deliver those 144 Hz.

AOC is touting this monitor as having a 3-side-frameless structure, which does look that way in the media photos - though those usually have to be taken with a grain of salt. Display output connectors include 1x VGA, 1x DisplayPort 1.2, and 2x HDMI 1.4. The AOC G2590FX monitor is now available worldwide at an MSRP of £219.99 (direct conversion puts it at some €252 or $290, but US pricing will likely be lower.

ASUS Intros ROG Swift PG27UQ Monitor with G-SYNC HDR

ASUS today introduced the Republic of Gamers (ROG) Swift PG27UQ, a 27-inch monitor with 4K Ultra HD resolution (3840 x 2160 pixels), a staggering 144 Hz refresh-rate, and support for NVIDIA G-Sync HDR. Under the hood is an IPS Quantum-Dot panel with DCI-P3 Color Gamut support, 4 ms response time, 178°/178° viewing angles, and 10-bpc (1.07 billion colors) support. 300-1000 cd/m² maximum brightness, and 20,000:1 static contrast ratio, make for the rest of the panel specifications.

The monitor features (and requires) DisplayPort 1.4 to sustain 4K @ 144 Hz with 10-bpc color. It also features HDMI 2.0. Also featured are GamePlus (OSD goodies), GameVisual (genre-specific display presets), a and 2-port USB 3.0 hub. The stand and the back-side of the display features RGB LED elements that can be controlled by Aura Sync RGB. The company didn't reveal pricing.

MSI Intros Optix AG32CQ Curved Gaming Monitor

The new MSI Optix AG32CQ probably sparks déjà vu because a monitor with a near-identical name and design was launched last October. That is, until you pay close attention to the "Q" in its name. The new Optix AG32CQ has a similar feature-set to the AG32C, but with increased resolution to 2560 x 1440 pixels, hence the "Q," denoting quad-HD. The 32-inch monitor with 1800R curvature still offers the goodness of a VA panel with 178°/178° viewing angles, 144 Hz refresh-rate (slightly lower than the 165 Hz of its Full HD predecessor), 1 ms (GTG) response-time, 3000:1 static contrast ratio, and support for AMD FreeSync technology. The company didn't reveal pricing.

AOC Announces AGON AG322QC4 Gaming Monitor with FreeSync 2 and DisplayHDR 400

Display specialist AOC is proud to announce the new addition to its AGON premium gaming monitor family, the AOC AGON AG322QC4 that offers stunning gaming visuals with its HDR400-compliant 3-sided frameless 31.5" VA panel, a razor-sharp Quad HD (2560x1440 px) resolution in 16:9 aspect ratio, deep and inky 2000:1 static contrast ratio and an aggressive 1800R curvature. The 144 Hz refresh rate, 4 ms GtG response time combined with FreeSync 2 support ensure a smooth gameplay experience at the utmost competitive level.

The AG322QC4 comes with recent display technologies for lifelike visuals and the smoothest gameplay experience, VESA DisplayHDR 400 and Radeon FreeSync 2. The VESA HDR400 specification ensures 400 cd/m² peak brightness, improved black levels, higher color gamut and more bit depth (color depth) to display High Dynamic Range (HDR) visuals.

BenQ Launches the EX3203R Monitor: 31.5", 2560 x 1440, 144 Hz, FreeSync 2, 1800R Curvature

BenQ announced a new entry to its monitor lineup under the model name EX3203R. It sports a 31.5" VA panel with 2560 x 1440 resolution, and can display frames at up to 144 Hz refresh rates. The slight 1800R curvature is expected to keep all points of the monitor at the same distance from users' eyes. AMD's FreeSync 2 technology is also being employed here, making this a more attractive proposition for gaming scenarios. Since this is FreeSync 2 we're talking about, the effective FreeSync range should be quite high, since support for LFC (Low Frame-Rate Compensation) is an essential part of the certification.

Like most BenQ (and other brands') monitors, BenQ is touting this panel as HDR-compatible, and sporting a HDR-specific luminance mode that achieves a top 400 cd/m² luminance - the basest of the base values allowed by AMD for HDR compatibility. Non-HDR content, however, will default to a top 300 cd/m² luminance. BenQ is quoting 90% DCI-P3 coverage. Connectivity options include 2x HDMI 1.4 ports, 1x DisplayPort 1.2a, 2x USB 3.1 ports, and 1x USB Type-C port. Pricing hasn't been announced at time of writing.

4K Ultra HD Monitors with 144 Hz Refresh-rate and G-SYNC HDR Start Being Available

As we reported in March, the first 4K monitors with 144 Hz refresh-rate began showing up in stores. This summer, PC gamers and enthusiasts up for a monitor upgrade, are in for a treat. An increasing number of companies are preparing to launch monitors with not just 4K Ultra HD resolution (3840 x 2160 pixels), but also staggering 144 Hz refresh-rates, and support for adaptive sync technologies, such as AMD FreeSync and NVIDIA G-Sync. To push 4K at 144 Hz, you'll need your graphics card to feature DisplayPort 1.4 (or above) connectivity, as DisplayPort 1.2, or even the newer HDMI 2.0, lack the required bandwidth.

Among the first blazing fast 4K UHD + 144 Hz monitors, are the 2018 Acer Predator X27 (UM.HX0EE.009) first unveiled in 2017, and soon to be joined by the ASUS ROG Swift PG27UQ. Both monitors feature 4K Ultra HD resolution, 144 Hz refresh-rate, IPS quantum-dot panels, and support for the new NVIDIA G-SYNC HDR standard. The monitors take input from DisplayPort 1.4 and HDMI 2.0, although you will need DisplayPort 1.4 to get 4K @ 144 Hz to work correctly. The IPS quantum-dot panels feature DCI-P3 color-standards, 99% Adobe RGB coverage, and 10 bpc (1.07 billion-color) palette, in addition to 384 LED elements backlighting the panel. The ROG Swift PG27UQ starts at 2,445€ and the Predator X27 at 18,475 DKK Sounds good? Get ready to foot upwards of USD $3,000 for either of them, to go with your $3,000 TITAN V, for a 3,000-inch e-p.

ASUS Intros VG258Q 25-inch Ultra Fast Gaming Monitor

ASUS introduced the VG258Q, a relatively cost-effective 25-inch gaming-grade monitor. Its Full HD (1920 x 1080 pixels) resolution is nothing to write home about, but the 144 Hz refresh-rate, 1 ms response time (gray to gray), ASUS Extreme Low Motion Blur (TV-type stutter compensation feature), and support for AMD FreeSync technology, and TUV Rheinland-certified flicker-free LED back-lighting, could pique your interest. Other vital specs include a TN-film panel, 400 cd/m² maximum brightness, dynamic mega-contrast ratio, and ASUS GamePlus enhancements, which include presets specific to game genres, OSD crosshair, frame-rate counters, etc. Display inputs include DisplayPort 1.2a (needed for FreeSync), HDMI 1.4, and dual-link DVI-D. The company didn't reveal pricing.

NVIDIA Expects Partners to Release 4K, 144 Hz G-Sync Displays With HDR in April

Reports have started doing the rounds that users might finally see NVIDIA's dream for 4K, 144 Hz gaming come to fruition as early as next month. NVIDIA's approach towards establishing a platform of a premium 4K gaming experience meant that manufacturers - of which ASUS and Acer are two of the foremost examples for this story - were forced to opt for a single panel solution, based on AU Optronics' M270QAN02.2 AHVA panel. This is because NVIDIA wanted gamers to be treated to a fully integrated solution, that boasted of features such as 3840×2160 resolution, a 144 Hz refresh rate, a 1000-nits brightness, a direct LED backlighting system with 384 zones, and feature a quantum dot film to enable HDR10 and coverage of the DCI-P3 color gamut.

However, with such stringent requirements, NVIDIA monitor partners would have to accept what constraints might arise from the panel manufacturer's side of the equation, which ultimately, resulted in a delay for the manufacturer's models - Acer Predator X27 and ASUS ROG Swift PG27UQ - from a 2017 release date to what is now expected to be a firm, April 2018 one. Gamers might thus be in for the impending release of some of the best monitors in the industry when it comes to a premium, high refresh-rate gaming experience. Now, where are those mainstream OLED panels with at least 900 nits brightness I wanted to get my hands on?

ASUS Intros MG248QE Gaming-grade 24-inch Monitor

ASUS today rolled out the MG248QE, an entry-level 24-inch gaming monitor. This monitor misses out on the coveted Republic of Gamers (ROG) branding by ASUS, but is still targeted at gamers, albeit on a tight budget, owing to is sub-$300 pricing. Don't stop reading at Full HD (1920 x 1080 pixels) resolution just yet - you get 144 Hz refresh-rate, 1 ms (GTG) response time, and support for AMD FreeSync. Many of ASUS' GamePlus features are carried over from its ROG monitor lineup, such as GameVisual game genre-specific display presets, OSD crosshairs, timers, frame-rate counters, and monitor-based bezel-compensation adjustments for multi-monitor setups.

Other vital specs of the ASUS MG248QE include a TN-film panel with 16.7 million-colors, 170°/160° (V/H) maximum viewing-angles, LED backlit illuimation with low blue-light, 350 cd/m² maximum brightness, 100000000:1 "ASUS Smart Contrast Ratio," and passive anti-ghosting that takes advantage of the panel's high refresh-rate. Display inputs include HDMI 1.4a, DisplayPort 1.2a, and dual-link DVI. Since this monitor is succeeding the company's VG248QE with a slightly refreshed feature-set (FreeSync and low blue-light), we expect it to sell at a similar price-point $250-$280.

Alienware Launches the AW3418HW Monitor on CES 2018: 34", WFHD, 3800R, G-Sync

Alienware today unveiled their latest gaming monitor, the AW3418HW. After you've parsed that seemingly unreadable name/product number, you should know that this monitor features a 38090R curved WFHD (2560x1080) display, with full NVIDIA G-SYNC support. Adding to its gaming chops, G-SYNC enables extra fluidity on the monitor's 144 Hz (stock, overclockable up to at least 160 Hz). The monitor has a pretty aggressive, "gaming" design, which definitely won't agree with all potential customers. However, one thing where the Alienware AW3418HW really is looking towards being a jack of all trades is its connectivity department: 1x Line-out port; 1x USB port with Power Charging; 1x Headphone jack; 1x USB 3.0 port; 1x USB upstream port; 2x USB 3.0 ports; 1x HDMI port; and 1x DisplayPort. Now breathe with me after all those connectivity options. That's it.

AOC Expands Their Mainstream Gaming Monitor Line-Up with New Frameless Models

Display specialist AOC today introduces three new gaming monitors which extend their successful mainstream gaming line represented by the well-received G2460PF and G2460VQ6. In addition to their appealing "3-sided frameless" design, the new G90 series boasts an impressive set of specs and features, guaranteeing a top-notch gaming experience: A refresh rate of 144 Hz and AMD FreeSync technology provide smooth gameplay without stuttering, tearing or motion blur, and a 1 ms response time eliminates ghosting effects. The new G90 displays offer AOC Low Input Lag Mode and AOC Shadow Control as well as a handy stand that can be easily mounted and removed without screws - perfect for LAN parties and esports tournaments!

Top-notch gaming performance
AOC's G90 series offers models in two sizes: the 24.5" AOC G2590VXQ and AOC G2590PX as well as the 27" AOC G2790PX. All of them feature a frameless 16:9 Full HD TN panel (1920 x 1080 pixels), a short 1 ms response time to eliminate annoying ghosting effects, a high refresh rate (G2590PX and G2790PX: 144 Hz, G2590VXQ: 75 Hz) and FreeSync support. The latter reduces stuttering, tearing and input lag for an even smoother gaming experience. The AOC Low Input Lag Mode gives gamers an additional edge: it bypasses most of the monitor's internal video processing, which results in even more responsive gameplay. Titles with a very dark map design especially benefit from the AOC Shadow Control feature: it lightens overly dark screen areas and darkens bright parts without affecting the rest of the screen.

MSI Intros Optix MAG24C Curved Gaming Monitor

MSI today introduced the Optix MAG24C, a 24-inch curved gaming-grade monitor, which could be the company's most affordable. Its Full HD (1920 x 1080 pixels) resolution may not be much to write home about in 2017, but bolstering it gaming-grade credentials are its 144 Hz refresh-rate, and 1 ms (GTG) response-time, and support for AMD FreeSync technology. It also features OSD crosshairs, FPS counters, and display presets specific to game genres.

The Optix MAG24C is based on a VA (vertical-alignment) display panel, with 1800R curvature, 178°/178° viewing-angles, 110% sRGB coverage, 250 cd/m² maximum brightness, and 3,000:1 static contrast-ratio (with dynamic mega-contrast). A blue-light reduction mechanism, and flicker-free brightness control, complete its panel-specific features. The monitor takes input from DisplayPort 1.2a (needed for 144 Hz and FreeSync), HDMI 1.4a, and DVI. Its stand allows tilt and height adjustments. The company didn't reveal pricing.

ASUS Also Intros ROG Strix XG32VQ 32-inch Curved Gaming Monitor

ASUS over the weekent, also introduced the Republic of Gamers (ROG) Strix XG32VQ 32-inch curved gaming monitor. The monitor features an 1800R curved VA panel with WQHD (2560 x 1440 pixels) resolution, bolstered further by 144 Hz refresh-rate, 4 ms (GTG) response time, and AMD FreeSync technology. The panel boasts of 125 percent coverage of the sRGB palette, and features 300 cd/m² maximum brightness, with 178°/178° viewing angles.

The monitor features ASUS GameFirst, a set of nifty features such as OSD crosshairs, frame-rate counters, and display presets optimized for the various game genres. An RGB LED ornament is positioned behind the panel, around the stand mount, with the signature laser projected ROG emblem below the stand. Display inputs include DisplayPort 1.2, mini-DisplayPort 1.2, and HDMI 1.4a. The company didn't reveal pricing.

Acer, ASUS Delaying Their 4K, 144 Hz G-Sync HDR Displays to 2018

It's confirmed: no 144 Hz 4K gaming with HDR in 2017 for NVIDIA gamers who want to make use of G-Sync t avoid screen tearing in their games. Acer last week announced that its 4K HDR Predator X27 gaming display would be delayed to Q1 2018 (meaning, no such thing below your Christmas tree or on your fireplace sock, sadly.) But it isn't Acer's fault, apparently: ASUS's ROG Swift PG27UQ, which features virtually the same specifications, has also been delayed to 2018. Both these monitors are based of an NVIDIA reference design showcased at Computex 2017 (you may remember a slight foul play there as well.)

The Acer Predator X27 and the ASUS ROG Swift PG27UQ are based on AU Optronics' M270QAN02.2 AHVA panel, which offers a 3840×2160 resolution and can reach a 144 Hz refresh rate. Something that really should make these monitors shine is the usage of a direct LED backlighting system with 384 zones, which can be individually dimmed or brightened as needed, which allows the panel to deliver much higher levels of contrast, needed for true HDR display. At least until OLED panels make their way to high-performance gaming monitors, these are expected to be the best of the crop.

MSI Announces the OPTIX Line of Gaming Monitors

MSI unveiled some of its first gaming monitors, under the MSI OPTIX brand. These include two models, the 27-inch OPTIX G27C, and the 24-inch OPTIX G24C. Both models feature Samsung-made TN-film display panels with 1800R curvature, Full HD (1920 x 1080 pixels) resolution, 144 Hz refresh-rate, 4 ms (GTG) response time, 178°/178° viewing-angles, and support for AMD FreeSync technology. Display inputs on both include DisplayPort 1.2a, HDMI 1.4a, and DVI. The 24-incher features a simpler design with a stand that allows basic height adjustment, while the 27-incher allows tilt adjustments. The company didn't reveal pricing.

LG Intros the 34UC89G-B 34-inch Curved Ultra Wide Gaming Monitor

LG today introduced the 34UC89G-B, a 34-inch curved ultra-wide gaming monitor. Featuring an aspect-ratio of 21:9, the monitor features a curved IPS panel with a native resolution of 2560 x 1080 pixels. Boosting its gaming credentials are its 144 Hz refresh-rate, a Dynamic Action Stabilizer feature for games, which reduces shaky-cam in games, an OSD crosshair, and support for NVIDIA G-SYNC technology. Other panel specs include 5 ms (GTG) response-time, 178°/178° viewing angles, 300 cd/m² maximum brightness, and dynamic mega-contrast. The monitor takes input from DisplayPort 1.2 and HDMI 1.4a connectors. Other features include a 2-port USB 3.0 hub. The monitor will start selling by mid-July.

Samsung Announces the CHG70 and CHG90 QLED Monitors: HDR and FreeSync 2

Remember that post on Samsung's investment on 32:9 aspect ratio monitors? The company has just materialized them, with the announcement of their 2017 flagship FreeSync 2 supporting monitors, which come in two different models and three different sizes. Samsung announced a world's first, the CHG90 QLED monitor, which leverages its alien 49" towards displaying a 32:9 presentation. That's what Samsung is calling a DFHD (Dual Full HD) screen, with a 3840x1080 resolution. This panel supports FreeSync 2, HDR, wide 178-degree viewing angles, and the now usual 1800R curvature, with blazingly-fast 144 Hz refresh rates and 1 ms response times.

At the same time, Samsung also announced the somewhat more mundane CHG70 QLED monitor, which comes in at either 27" or 31,5". Whatever your choice of panel size, these are essentially the same specs-wise, and differ little from the CHG90: they offer WQHD resolution (2560x1440), HDR, FreeSync 2, wide 178-degree viewing angles, and the now usual 1800R curvature, along with blazing-fast 144 Hz refresh rates and 1 ms response times.

ASUS Unveils Three Freesync-enabled, High Refresh Rate Strix Monitors

ASUS is looking to have two distinct monitor product lines catering to either AMD or NVIDIA enthusiasts. Adding to their Swift line-up of NVIDIA G-Sync monitors, ASUS seems to be building up a Strix line as well, which features AMD's FreeSync technology to deliver the same fundamental variable refresh rate technology at a lower price-point (or so we hope.)

Starting with the flagship Strix monitor, the ASUS Strix XG32V has a 31.5" IPS panel with a WQHD resolution of 2560 x 1440. It's curved, so it envelops your FOV better, with the usual 1800R curve. This model can handle refresh rates of up to 144Hz, though readers looking to jump at this panel as we speak should wait for both Freesync range and pricing announcements. Connectivity-wise, we're looking at 2x DisplayPort 1.2, 1x HDMI 2.0, and an os yet unknown amount of USB 3.0 ports. ASUS has also added the inevitable Aura Sync lighting to the XG32V, materialized on both a ROG logo that shines down onto the desk, as well as an RGB LED suite on the back of the unit that can be synchronized with other Aura Sync-enabled PC components and peripherals.
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