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AMD Launches Ryzen 5000G "Cezanne" APU Lineup for OEMs

AMD has today decided to launch the next generation of Accelerated Processing Units (APUs), now in form of the 5000G lineup codenamed Cezanne. The APUs are getting launched as OEM-exclusive products for now, which means that only manufacturers like Dell, HP, Lenovo, etc. can have access to them. AMD is set to announce these processors for wider masses, such as consumer DIYers, later this year. So you must be wondering what is new about the 5000G APUs. For starters, the new APUs feature AMD's improved Zen 3 core with a notable IPC boost over Zen 2 found in last generation 4000G APUs. When it comes to graphics, the new APUs feature anywhere from 6-8 GPU cores, based on the Vega architecture.

When it comes to the available models, AMD lists six SKUs, all differentiating in CPU/GPU core count, TDP, and frequency. There are three regular SKUs, with their power-efficient variants. The regular SKUs are AMD Ryzen 7 5700G, Ryzen 5 5600G, and Ryzen 3 5300G. They are normal SKUs that have a TDP of 65 Watts, meaning a higher base frequency needing a more adequate cooling solution. However, as there are regular SKUs, there are also power-efficient, TDP-constrained models present. Called the AMD Ryzen 7 5700GE, Ryzen 5 5600GE, and Ryzen 3 5300GE, these models bring the TDP down to 35 Watts and reduce base frequency by a couple of hundreds of MHz.

Intel Core i9-11900T "Rocket Lake" Processor Allegedly Catches Up with Zen 3 in Single-Threaded Performance

When AMD announced its Ryzen 5000 series of processors based on the new Zen 3 architecture, the performance of these processors was the best on the market. Even in our own testing, we have found that AMD's Zen 3 core is the highest performing core on the market, even beating Intel's latest and greatest, the 10th generation of Core processors. However, Intel has been doing some silent work and the company has developed a new core to be used in the 11th generation "Rocket Lake" platform. Codenamed Cypress Cove, the design is representing a backport of the 10 nm Sunny Cove design, supposed to bring around 19% IPC improvement across the board.

If you were wondering if that was enough to catch up with AMD's Zen 3 IPC performance, look no further because we have Geekbench 5 performance results of Intel's 35 Watt Core i9-11900T processor. Having a base frequency of only 1.51 GHz, the CPU is capable of boosting one or two cores to the very high speed of 4.9 GHz, giving us a good example of the single-threaded performance we can expect from this CPU. In GB5 tests, the Core i9-11900T has managed to score 1717 points in the single-threaded test and 8349 points in multi-threaded results. Comparing that to something like AMD Ryzen 5800X, which scores 1674 points in single-threaded results, Rocket Lake's Cypress Cove core has managed to be 2.5% faster than Zen 3. However, in multi-threaded results, the AMD chip is unmatched as the low TDP of the Intel processor is stopping it from reaching full performance.

Intel Confirms Development of 8-core Tiger Lake-H Processors

Intel's Corporate Vice President of Client Computing Group Boyd Phelps posted an article on medium where he confirms development of 8-core Tiger Lake-based CPU solutions, to be released during the year 2021. This was confirmed by Boyd saying that 8-core Tiger Lake CPUs would have access to 24 MB of LLC cache (adequately doubling the 12 MB available for 4-core Tiger Lake-U parts that we already know about); Boyd then simply added in parentheticals "more detail on 8-core products at a later date".

The 8-core processors will be part of the Tiger Lake-H product stack, which, according to a leaker on PTT Shopping, would scale between the 35 W-45 W TDPs with various core and GPU Execution Unit counts. The 45 W high-performance parts can feature between 4, 6, and 8-cores - but additional space taken up by the CPU cores is thus unavailable for GPU resources, which top out at 32 Intel Xe EUs (and will make use of a BGA1787 socket). The 35 W variants, on the other hand, will be installed in the same socket as Tiger Lake-U - BGA 1449 - and reportedly only offer a 4-core design with 96 EUs.

AMD Renoir APU Models Spotted in ASUS Notebooks

Following the previous report about AMD's upcoming "Renoir" APU lineup of processors for notebook and desktop, we have new information about the new processor models and their configurations. Supposed to launch in early 2020, the Renoir lineup is supposed to feature up to 8 cores and 16 threads in high-end models. Dubbed Ryzen 4000 series, the new APU lineup will be available in four configurations determined by its TDP: 15 W and 45 W chips for notebooks, and 35 W and 65 W variants meant for desktop.

According to WCCFTech, AMD will launch high-performance Ryzen 9 4900H and Ryzen 7 4800H APUs soon in the first notebooks. Supposed to be part of the "H" series of mobile APUs, these models will feature high core count, that can reach up to 8 cores, SMT support as well, all within TPD of 45 Watts. A power-optimized Ryzen 7 4800HS has also appeared in the listings as a lower clocked alternative to Ryzen 7 4800H, which is supposed to feature lower TDP as well. All of the former processors appear listed as the base of ASUSes upcoming GA401 and GA502 laptops, featuring 16 GB of RAM, Windows 10, and a 14-inch display. While configurations of the laptop will affect its price, Ryzen 7 4800HS powered model is currently listed at 1904 EUR, featuring 16 GB of RAM and 1 TB of storage, so we now have a ballpark price estimate to speculate upon.

Intel's Energy-Efficient Core i9-9900T Pops up on Geekbench 4

We originally covered Intel's work on the (more) energy-efficient version of their Core i9-9900 processor back in January. However, it seems that the company has improved the i9-9900T's performance before final release. Initial specifications for the processor were expected to deliver a 1.70 GHz base clock (down from 3.60 GHz of the original i9-9900K), with 1~2 core Turbo Boost frequency down to 3.80 GHz. However, the Geekbench benchmarks show a different story, one that's much more appealing to users: Intel managed to keep the 35 W TDP target, but base clocks stand at a much more interesting 2.1 GHz and much improved Boost clocks of 4.4 GHz.

This is good news, as performance is sure to be better than initially expected. However, this seems like a necessary move from Intel - AMD's Ryzen 3000 processors would be staring hungrily to Intel's 9900T otherwise (and likely still are). The eight cores, 16 threads, 16 MB of cache and Intel UHD Graphics 630 are kept from the original part. The test scores pitting it against an Intel i9-9900KS show an expected drop in performance compared to the faster processor. The Core i9-9900T has an Intel-set pricing of $439.
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