News Posts matching "Adaptive Sync"

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NVIDIA Has No Plans for Adaptive Sync Support on Maxwell, Prior GPUs

In case anyone's been living under a rock (and in these times, if you can do that, I probably envy you), NVIDIA at CES 2019 announced it was opening up G-Sync support to non-G-Sync totting monitors. Via adoption of VESA's open VRR standard (Adaptive Sync, on which FreeSync is based), the company will now add support for monitors that usually only support FreeSync. The company also vowed to test all configurations and monitors, with a whitelist of automatically-enabled panels and manual override for those that don't pass the certification process or still haven't been subjected to it.

Now, via a post on NVIDIA's GeForce forums, ManuelGuzmanNV, with a Customer Care badge, has said, in answer to a users' question on Variable Refresh-Rate support for NVIDIA's 9000 series, that "Sorry but we do not have plans to add support for Maxwell and below". So this means that only NVIDIA's 1000 and 2000-series of GPUs will be getting said support, thus reducing the number of users for which VRR support on NVIDIA graphics cards is relevant. At the same time, this might serve as a reason for those customers to finally make the jump to one of NVIDIA's more recent graphics card generations, in case they don't already own a VRR-capable monitor and want to have some of that smoothness.

NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang on Radeon VII: "Underwhelming (...) the Performance is Lousy"; "Freesync Doesn't Work"

PC World managed to get a hold of NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang, picking his thoughts on AMD's recently announced Radeon VII. Skirting through the usual amicable, politically correct answers, Jensen made his thoughts clear on what the competition is offering to compete with NVIDIA's RTX 2000 series. The answer? Vega VII is an "underwhelming product", because "The performance is lousy and there's nothing new. [There's] no ray tracing, no AI. It's 7nm with HBM memory that barely keeps up with a 2080. And if we turn on DLSS we'll crush it. And if we turn on ray tracing we'll crush it." Not content on dissing the competition's product, Jensen Huang also quipped regarding AMD's presentation and product strategy, saying that "It's a weird launch, maybe they thought of it this morning."

Intel's Chris Hook Confirms Commitment to Support VESA Adaptive Sync on Intel GPUs

Intel's Chris Hook (there's something strange there) said in a conversation with r/Hardware's moderator dylan522p that the company is still planning on adding support for VESA's Adaptive Sync (also known as AMD's own FreeSync branding) in Intel GPUs. To put this in perspective, Intel is the single largest player in the overall graphics market; their integrated solutions mean they have the highest graphics accelerator share in the market, even against AMD and NVIDIA - and Intel hasn't even entered the discrete graphics market - yet.

It makes sense that the blue giant would be pursuing this option - royalty-free frame syncing beats developing a proprietary alternative. A quick thought-exercise could point towards NVIDIA's G-Sync being rendered irrelevant with such strong support from the industry.

Philips 436M6VBPAB Monitor Gets DisplayHDR 1000 Certification

MMD, the leading technology company and brand release partner for Philips monitors, is proud to announce its recently launched Philips 436M6VBPAB was confirmed by Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) as the first display to be officially certified for the DisplayHDR 1000 specification, capable of delivering a profoundly new viewing experience, thanks to striking brightness, deeper contrast and vibrant colours. The new Philips Momentum Line has already been honored with the Computex d & I Award 2017 by IF and Red Dot guru award: Product Design 2017 for its eye-catching and innovative design. It now proudly includes among its achievements the world-renowned VESA DisplayHDR 1000 and UHDA certification, which confirm MMD's commitment to delivering innovative products capable of satisfying even the most demanding segments of the market.

MSI Intros the OPTIX MPG27CQ Monitor: 27", WQHD, 144 Hz, 1800R, VA Panel

MSI has added another monitor to its OPTIX lineup, in the form of the OPTIX MPG27CQ monitor. This one sports a VA-type 27" panel, which delivers its images in a crisp, WQHD (2560 x 1440) resolution. The usage of a VA panel means this monitor is able to deliver up to 144 Hz refresh rates with a 1 ms response time and 178/178 viewing angles, while sRGB and NTSC coverage stand at 115% and 100%, respectively.

Another thing to note is the monitor's rated brightness: at 400 cd/m², it isn't the best we've seen, but at least it holds its maximum brightness honorably, without adding any HDR-capable gimmicks, even though it's much more capable of that than some other monitors that have been recently announced. One of the more interesting thinks about this monitor, however, is the inclusion of SteelSeries' Game Sense technology, which should allow the bottom bezel led strips to react to your gaming conditions, such as ammo count, health, and other factors. Additionally for gamers, there's support for Adaptive Sync tech to smooth out the frame-rate and avoid tearing.
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