News Posts matching "Ampere"

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NVIDIA AIB Manli: GA104-400 Registered, GeForce GTX 2070 and 2080 Listed

There's just no quieting the rumor mill. It's like we're walking through a field that's made entirely of small pieces of stone that we inadvertently kick - and under every stone, another tidbit, another speculation, another pointer - a veritable breadcrumb trail that's getting more and more convoluted. Even as we were getting sort of decided in regards to NVIDIA's next-generation hardware and its nomenclature and model number - 1100 series - we now have two distinct sources and reports popping one right after the other that point to a 2000 series - and that also suggests Ampere might be in the cards for the next-gen product after all.

NVIDIA's Next Gen GPU Launch Held Back to Drain Excess, Costly Built-up Inventory?

We've previously touched upon whether or not NVIDIA should launch their 1100 or 2000 series of graphics cards ahead of any new product from AMD. At the time, I wrote that I only saw benefits to that approach: earlier time to market -> satisfaction of upgrade itches and entrenchment as the only latest-gen manufacturer -> raised costs over lack of competition -> ability to respond by lowering prices after achieving a war-chest of profits. However, reports of a costly NVIDIA mistake in overestimating demand for its Pascal GPUs does lend some other shades to the whole equation.

Write-offs in inventory are costly (just ask Microsoft), and apparently, NVIDIA has found itself in a miscalculating demeanor: overestimating gamers' and miners' demand for their graphics cards. When it comes to gamers, NVIDIA's Pascal graphics cards have been available in the market for two years now - it's relatively safe to say that the majority of gamers who needed higher-performance graphics cards have already taken the plunge. As to miners, the cryptocurrency market contraction (and other factors) has led to a taper-out of graphics card demand for this particular workload. The result? NVIDIA's demand overestimation has led, according to Seeking Alpha, to a "top three" Taiwan OEM returning 300,000 GPUs to NVIDIA, and "aggressively" increased GDDR5 buying orders from the company, suggesting an excess stock of GPUs that need to be made into boards.

NVIDIA's Next-Gen Graphics Cards to Launch in Q3 2018, Breadcrumb Trail Indicates

We the media and you enthusiasts are always getting scare jumps every time a high-profile launch is announced - or even hinted at. And few product launches are as enthusing as those of new, refined graphics cards architectures - the possibilities for extra performance, bang for buck improvements, mid-tier performance that belonged in last generation's halo products - it's all a mix of merriment and expectation - even if it sometimes tastes a little sour.

Adding to the previous breadcrumbs neatly laid-out regarding NVIDIA's Hot Chips presentation on a new "Next Generation mainstream GPU", the source for et another piece of bread that would make Grettel proud comes from Power Logic, a fan supplier for numerous AIB partners (company representative holding an EVGA graphics card below), who have recently said they expected "Q3 orders to be through the roof". Such an increase in demand usually means increased orders as AIB partners stock up on materials to produce a substantial enough stock for new product launches, and does fall in line with the NVIDIA Hot Chips presentation in August. Q3 starts in July, though, and while the supply-chain timings are unknown, it seems somewhat tight for a July product launch that coincides with the increased fan orders.

Next-Generation NVIDIA Mobile GPUs to Be Released Towards End of 2018

An official Gigabyte UK Notebook representative, who goes by the name of Atom80, over at the OverclockersUK forums has confirmed that NVIDIA's next-generation mobile GPUs will launch towards the end of this year. When asked about whether Gigabyte will be providing a GTX 1080 option for their Aero 15X V8-CF1 notebook, Atom80 stated that there are no plans to upgrade the Aorus notebook family until the next-generation GPUs are available. Since the mobile variants usually launch a few months after the desktop variants, it's possible that we're looking at a summer launch for the desktop models.

NVIDIA Bracing for a Cryptocurrency Demand Drop

In what could bring cheers to PC gamers, and tears to miners, NVIDIA is reportedly wary of a possible drop in cryptocurrencies through 2018. This directly affects the company, since GPUs are used in mining various cryptocurrencies, which triggered inflation in prices of graphics cards from Q2-2017 to Q1-2018. Over the past couple of weeks, prices of popular high-end GPUs such as the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti have cooled, although not back to their original levels. NVIDIA's manufacturing division, which sub-contracts silicon fabrication to TSMC, is calculating the impact a cryptocurrency slump could have on its supply-chain, and are being conservative with their orders to the foundry. A drop in demand could leave the company with vast amounts of unsold inventories based on an old-generation architecture (Pascal, in the wake of Volta/Ampere), which could result in multi-billion-dollar inventory write-offs. According to a Digitimes report, NVIDIA has placed restrictions on its add-in card (AIC) partners on marketing cryptocurrency mining abilities of their graphics cards, and selling directly to large miners.

In addition to a slump in demand for cryptocurrencies, 2018 could see introduction of purpose-built crypto-mining ASICs that are tailored for popular cryptocurrencies. Purpose-built ASICs tend to be extremely economical for medium-thru-large scale miners, in comparison to GPUs. The third horseman is policy. While several governments around the world have developed an appreciation for blockchain technology for its resilience to tampering, fraud, and data-theft (which could be implemented in safekeeping government- and bank-records); governments are, understandably, anti-cryptocurrency, as it undermines sovereign legal tender issued by central banks, and aids tax-evasion. Several governments through 2017-18 have announced measures to crack down on cryptocurrency mining and use as tender. This has led to a further drop in public interest in cryptocurrencies, as large ICO investors are weary of losing money in a highly volatile market. Close to half the ICOs have failed.

Report: NVIDIA Not Unveiling 2018 Graphics Card Lineup at GDC, GTC After All

It's being reported by Tom's Hardware, citing industry sources, that NVIDIA isn't looking to expand upon its graphics cards lineup at this years' GDC (Game Developers Conference) or GTC (GPU Technology Conference). Even as reports have been hitting the streets that pointed towards NVIDIA announcing (if not launching) their two new product architectures as early as next month, it now seems that won't be the case after all. As a reminder, the architectures we're writing about here are Turing, reportedly for crypto-mining applications, and Ampere, the expected GeForce architecture leapfrogging the current top of the line - and absent from regular consumer shores - Volta.

There's really not much that can be gleaned as of now from industry sources, though. It's clear no one has received any kind of information from NVIDIA when it comes to either of their expected architectures, which means an impending announcement isn't likely. At the same time, NVIDIA really has no interest in pulling the trigger on new products - demand is fine, and competition from AMD is low. As such, reports of a June or later announcement/release are outstandingly credible, as are reports that NVIDIA would put the brakes on a consumer version of Ampere, use it to replace Volta on the professional and server segment, and instead launch Volta - finally - on the consumer segment. This would allow the company to cache in on their Volta architecture, this time on consumer products, for a full generation longer, while innovating the market - of sorts. All scenarios are open right now; but one thing that seems clear is that there will be no announcements next month.

NVIDIA to Unveil "Ampere" Based GeForce Product Next Month

NVIDIA prepares to make its annual tech expo, the 2018 Graphics Technology Conference (GTC) action-packed. The company already surprised us with its next-generation "Volta" architecture based TITAN V graphics card priced at 3 grand; and is working to cash in on the crypto-currency wave and ease pressure on consumer graphics card inventories by designing highly optimized mining accelerators under the new Turing brand. There's now talk that NVIDIA could pole-vault launch of the "Volta" architecture for the consumer-space; by unveiling a GeForce graphics card based on its succeeding architecture, "Ampere."

The oldest reports of NVIDIA unveiling "Ampere" date back to November 2017. At the time it was expected that NVIDIA will only share some PR blurbs on some of the key features it brings to the table, or at best, unveil a specialized (non-gaming) silicon, such as a Drive or machine-learning chip. An Expreview report points at the possibility of a GeForce product, one that you can buy in your friendly neighborhood PC store and play games with. The "Ampere" based GPU will still be based on the 12 nanometer silicon fabrication process at TSMC, and is unlikely to be a big halo chip with exotic HBM stacks. Why NVIDIA chose to leapfrog is uncertain. GTC gets underway late-March.

NVIDIA "Volta" Architecture Successor Codenamed "Ampere," Expected GTC 2018

NVIDIA has reportedly codenamed the GPU architecture that succeeds its upcoming "Volta" architecture after the 18th century French physicist who is one of the pioneers of electromagnetism, André-Marie Ampère, after whom the popular unit of measuring current is named. The new NVIDIA "Ampere" GPU architecture, which succeeds "Volta," will make its debut at the 2018 Graphics Technology Conference (GTC), hosted by NVIDIA. As with GPU architecture launches by the company in recent times, one can expect an unveiling of the architecture, followed by preliminary technical presentations by NVIDIA engineers, with actual products launching a little later, and consumer-grade GeForce product launching much later.

NVIDIA is yet to launch GeForce products based on its upcoming "Volta" architecture as its current "Pascal" architecture turns 18 months old in the consumer graphics space. Should NVIDIA continue on the four-digit model number scheme of its GeForce 10-series "Pascal" family, one can expect those based on "Volta" to follow the GeForce 20-series, and "Ampere" GeForce 30-series. NVIDIA is yet to disclose the defining features of the "Ampere" architecture. We'll probably have to wait until March 2018 to find out.
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