News Posts matching #DDR4-3200

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Intel 10th Generation Core "Comet Lake" Lineup Detailed

Intel's short-term reaction to AMD's 3rd generation Ryzen processor family is the 10th generation Core "Comet Lake." These processors are based on existing "Skylake" cores, but have core-counts increased at the top-end, and HyperThreading enabled across the entire lineup. The Core i3 series are now 4-core/8-thread; the Core i5 series a 6-core/12-thread, the Core i7 series are 8-core/16-thread, and the new Core i9 series are 10-core/20-thread. Besides core-counts, Intel has given its 14 nanometer node one last step of refinement to come up with the new 14 nm+++ nodelet. This enables Intel to significantly dial up clock speeds across the board. These processors come in the new LGA1159 package, and are not backwards-compatible with LGA1151 motherboards. These chips also appear to feature an on-package PCH, instead of chipset on the motherboard.

Leading the pack is the Core i9-10900KF, a 10-core/20-thread chip clocked at 4.60 GHz with 5.20 GHz Turbo Boost, 20 MB of shared L3 cache, native support for DDR4-3200, and a TDP of 105 W. Intel's new 10-core die appears to physically lack an iGPU, since none of the other Core i9 10-core models offer integrated graphics. For this reason, all three processor models have the "F" brand extension denoting lack of integrated graphics. The i9-10900KF is closely followed by the i9-10900F clocked at 4.40/5.20 GHz, the lack of an unlocked multiplier, and 95 W TDP rating. The most affordable 10-core part is the i9-10800F, clocked at 4.20 GHz with 5.00 GHz boost, and a TDP of just 65 W. Intel has set ambitious prices for these chips. The i9-10900KF is priced at $499, followed by the i9-10900F at $449, and the i9-10800F at $409.

ZADAK at Computex: Boutique Memory, Coolers, Gaming Desktops, and Case-Mods

ZADAK may have dropped the "511" from its name, but remains a sought-after boutique hardware brand for case-modders. At its Computex 2019 booth, the company showed off its latest memory modules, cooling products, and a few case-mods that put the two together. The centerpiece at the booth was the Spark line of premium DDR4 memory modules. Silver accents of brushed aluminium top a darker shade, crowned by a silicone addressable-RGB LED diffuser. Each module has five lighting zones - top, top sides, and corners, which the maker calls "Dynamic multi-zone RGB." Each module cycles between 8 lighting presets, although with a 3-pin ARGB connection, you can play with the lighting via software.

ZADAK Spark memory comes in single-module, dual-channel, and quad-channel kits of 8 GB and 16 GB modules, which are further differentiated in four speeds, DDR4-3000, DDR4-3200, DDR4-3600, and DDR4-4133. Up to 3200 MHz, these modules offer timings of 16-18-18-38@1.35V, which loosen to 17-19-19-39@1.35V for DDR4-3600, and 19-21-21-42@1.4V for DDR4-4133. ZADAK claims it tested each memory kit for advertised settings on both Intel Core and AMD Ryzen platforms. Prices start at USD $159.99 for a 2x 8 GB DDR4-3200 memory kit. Next up, is the ZADAK Spark AIO closed-loop liquid CPU cooler.

AMD Zen 2 CPUs to Support Official JEDEC 3200 MHz Memory Speeds

An AMD-based system's most important performance pairing lies in the CPU and system RAM, as a million articles written ever since the introduction of AMD's first generation Ryzen CPUs have shown (remember the races for Samsung B-die based memory?). There are even tools that allow you to eke out the most performance out of your AMD system via fine memory overclocking and timings adjustment, which just goes to show the importance the enthusiast community derives from such tiny details that maximize your AMD Zen-based CPU performance. Now, notorious leaker @momomo_us has seemingly confirmed that AMD has worked wonders on its memory controller, achieving a base JEDEC 3200 MHz specification - up from the previously officially supported DDR4-2666 speeds in the first-gen Ryzen (updated to DDR4-2933 speeds on the 12 nm update).
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