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ADATA Launches DDR5-4800 Memory Module

ADATA Technology, a manufacturer of high-performance DRAM modules, NAND Flash products, mobile accessories, gaming products, electric power trains, and industrial solutions today announces the ADATA DDR5-4800, a next-generation DDR5 memory module that is capable of reaching frequencies of up to 4800MT/s and comes with up to 32 GB of capacity. In addition, ADATA has worked with six major motherboard brands, including AORUS, ASROCK, ASUS, GIGABYTE, MSI and ROG to ensure optimal performance and compatibility across a wide range of motherboards.

"Through our strong R&D capabilities and close partnerships with the world's leading motherboard makers, we are committed to offering memory modules with next-generation performance, higher capacities, and enhanced stability," said Nick Dai, Senior Manager of DRAM Products at ADATA. "In the coming months, we will continue to launch a diverse array of DDR5 products to meet the different needs of creators, gamers, and other users."

GeIL DDR5 Memory Newegg Listing Indicates Heavy Early-Adopter Tax

Client-segment DDR5 memory is on the anvil, with Intel 12th Gen Core "Alder Lake-S" desktop processors that support them. It should come as little surprise then, that some of the first DDR5 memory kits will be outrageously pricey. One such product, a GeIL Polaris RGB DDR5-4800 2x 16 GB kit, saw an early listing on Newegg for $350. DDR5-4800 can be considered an entry-level memory speed (similar to DDR4-2400, when the DDR4 standard was new). DDR5 heralds 16 GB as the new mainstream module density, with "single rank" (two individual ranks for each of the two 40-bit channels per DIMM) being standard. 32 GB per DIMM will be the new premium density (four ranks, two each for the 40-bit channels per DIMM).

Given these, it's conceivable that the first DDR5 memory kits targeting gamers and PC enthusiasts will come with a heavy early-adopter premium. Luckily, the 12th Gen Core processors support both DDR5 and DDR4 memory standards, and there appears to have been a major attempt by Intel to get its motherboard partners to launch motherboards with DDR4 slots across a wide range of price-points, so people can keep using their existing memory, or buy the relatively more affordable memory kits out there. It remains to be seen just how much of a performance penalty using DDR4 attracts on the new processors.
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