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New GP104 ASIC Picture Hints at GTX 1080 with GDDR5X Memory

A new picture of NVIDIA GP104 "Pascal" ASIC surrounded with GDDR5X memory chips hints at the possibility of NVIDIA reserving the new fast memory standard for the GTX 1080, and older GDDR5 for the more affordable GTX 1070. The picture reveals a GP104 chip with the ASIC code "GP104-400-A1," surrounded by eight Micron-made GDDR5X memory chips. We know from an older article that this ASIC code denotes the top-tier GTX 1080. A second picture (recently posted) reveals a "GP104-200-A1" ASIC surrounded by conventional GDDR5 memory chips. This ASIC corresponds to the second-fastest GTX 1070.

GDDR5 and GDDR5X are nearly identical electrically, and it's quite conceivable that the GP104 chip features a memory controller that supports both standards. GDDR5 can be had at speeds of up to 8 Gbps, while GDDR5X chips can range between 10 Gbps thru 12 Gbps initially, with 14 Gbps chips planned for a little later. Besides memory, CUDA core count could be another factor that sets the two SKUs apart. NVIDIA is planning to launch a total of three SKUs based on the GP104 silicon, in June 2016, beginning with the GTX 1080 and GTX 1070 in early-June (probably along the sidelines of Computex 2016), and a third SKU in mid-June.

AMD's GPU Roadmap for 2016-18 Detailed

AMD finalized the GPU architecture roadmap running between 2016 and 2018. The company first detailed this at its Capsaicin Event in mid-March 2016. It sees the company's upcoming "Polaris" architecture, while making major architectural leaps over the current-generation, such as a 2.5-times performance/Watt uplift and driving the company's first 14 nanometer GPUs; being limited in its high-end graphics space presence. Polaris is rumored to drive graphics for Sony's upcoming 4K Ultra HD PlayStation, and as discrete GPUs, it will feature in only two chips - Polaris 10 "Ellesmere" and Polaris 11 "Baffin."

"Polaris" introduces several new features, such as HVEC (h.265) decode and encode hardware-acceleration, new display output standards such as DisplayPort 1.3 and HDMI 2.0; however, since neither Polaris 10 nor Polaris 11 are really "big" enthusiast chips that succeed the current "Fiji" silicon, will likely make do with current GDDR5/GDDR5X memory standards. That's not to say that Polaris 10 won't disrupt current performance-thru-enthusiast lineups, or even have the chops to take on NVIDIA's GP104. First-generation HBM limits the total memory amount to 4 GB over a 4096-bit path. Enthusiasts will have to wait until early-2017 for the introduction of the big-chip that succeeds "Fiji," which will not only leverage HBM2 to serve up vast amounts of super-fast memory; but also feature a slight architectural uplift. 2018 will see the introduction of its successor, codenamed "Navi," which features an even faster memory interface.

PlayStation 4K to Feature a 2,304-SP AMD "Polaris" GPU

Sony's upcoming 4K Ultra HD game console, which its fans are referring to as the "PlayStation 4K," while being internally referred to by Sony as "NEO," could feature a very powerful GPU. AMD could custom-design the SoC that drives the console, to feature an 8-core 64-bit x86 CPU based on the "Jaguar" micro-architecture, running at 2.10 GHz; and a GPU component featuring 36 compute units based on "next-generation Graphics CoreNext" architecture.

36 next-gen GCN compute units sounds an awful lot like the specs of the Polaris10 "Ellesmere" chip in its Radeon R9 480 configuration, working out to a stream processor count of 2,304 - double that of the 1,152 on the current-gen PlayStation 4. The SoC is also rumored to feature a 256-bit GDDR5 memory interface holding 8 GB of memory. This memory will be used as both system and video memory, just like on the current-gen PlayStation 4. The memory bandwidth will be increased to 218 GB/s from the current 176 GB/s. Besides 4K Ultra HD gaming, this chip could also prepare Sony for VR headsets, leveraging AMD's LiquidVR tech.

AMD to Launch Radeon R7 470 and R9 480 at Computex

Computex 2016 could see some major consumer graphics action, with AMD reportedly planning to launch two mid-thru-performance segment products on the sidelines of the event - the Radeon R7 470, based on the 14 nm "Baffin" (Polaris 11) silicon, and the Radeon R9 480, based on the 14 nm "Ellesmere" (Polaris 10) silicon. The R7 470 could succeed the R7 370 series in not just performance, but also offer a leap in energy efficiency, with a TDP of less than 50W. The R9 480, on the other hand, could feature a TDP of just 110-135W (R9 380 is rated at 190W).

The R9 480, based on the "Ellesmere" (Polaris 10) is shaping up to be a particularly interesting silicon. It's rumored to feature 2,304 stream processors based on the 4th generation Graphics CoreNext architecture, with 2,560 stream processors being physically present on the chip; and a 256-bit wide GDDR5 (GDDR5X-ready) memory controller. 8 GB could be the standard memory amount. AMD could keep the clock speeds relatively low, with 800-1050 MHz GPU clocks. Imagine R9 390-like performance at half its power-draw.

NVIDIA "Pascal" GP104 Silicon Pictured

A picture of NVIDIA's next performance-segment GPU based on the upcoming "Pascal" architecture, the GP104, was leaked to the web, revealing a heap of raw material to speculate from. To begin with, GP104 retains the traditional component layout of a simple GPU die sitting on a conventional fiberglass substrate package, with memory chips surrounding it. NVIDIA is reserving exotic specs such as stacked HBM2 memory for the high-end GP100 silicon.

Some fairly straightforward trignometry reveals that the rectangular die of the GP104 measures 15.35 mm x 19.18 mm, with one source speculating a transistor-count of 7.4-7.9 billion. The card is expected to feature 8 gigabit GDDR5 memory chips, which tick at 8 GHz (GDDR5-effective). If the memory bus width is 256-bit, then you're looking at a memory bandwidth of 256 GB/s. The CUDA core count of the GP104 could be closer to 2,560, than the 4,096 from an older report.

Mid-range "Pascal" GPUs Stick to GDDR5-class Memory

At the NVIDIA Drive PX compute module unveiling, company CEO Jen-Hsun Huang gave us the first glimpse of a mid-range GPU based on the "Pascal" architecture. This chip looks a lot more conventional than the fancy HBM2-infused multi-chip module that's at the heart of the Tesla P100. Its package is a traditional green fiberglass substrate with a rectangular die at the center; and is surrounded by conventional-looking GDDR5-class memory chips (which could very well be GDDR5X). The Drive PX is a GPU-accelerated deep-learning box that NVIDIA is basing much of its self-driving car tech around; and uses a pair of these mid-range "Pascal" MXM boards.

NVIDIA Unveils the Quadro M6000 24GB Graphics Card

NVIDIA announced the Quadro M6000, its new high-end workstation single-GPU graphics card. Based on the GM200 silicon, and leveraging the "Maxwell" GPU architecture, the M6000 maxes out all the hardware features of the chip, featuring 3,072 CUDA cores, 192 TMUs, 96 ROPs, and a 384-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, holding 24 GB of memory, double that of the GeForce GTX TITAN X. Its peak single-precision floating point performance is rated at 7 TFLOP/s.

Where the M6000 differs from its the GTX TITAN X is its workstation-grade features. It drops the HDMI 2.0 connector for a total of four DisplayPort 1.2 connectors, supporting a total of four 4K Ultra HD displays. The dual-link DVI connector stays on. There's also an optional stereoscopic 3D connector. The nView MultiDisplay tech provides more flexible display-head configurations than the ones you find on NVIDIA's consumer graphics GPUs; you also get NVIDIA GPUDirect support, which gives better memory sharing access for multi-GPU systems. The M6000 supports most modern 3D APIs, such as DirectX 12, OpenGL 4.5, and Vulkan; with compute capabilities over CUDA, OpenCL, and DirectCompute. NVIDIA didn't reveal pricing.

Aitech Announces High Performance Video and Graphics in AMD-powered PMC Board

Aitech Defense Systems Inc. recently announced the M598, the latest video and graphics PMC in its vast line of AMD-driven solutions, designed to simultaneously drive several independent video streams in a wide variety of outputs. The versatile PMC uses the AMD Radeon E8860 (Andelaar) GPU, providing six independent graphics heads with 2 GB of GDDR5 operating at up to 1125 MHz.

In addition to the independent video stream capture, the M598 provides advanced video overlay functionality. Once the E8860 processor generates the graphics images, an input from one of the video formats is superimposed and the final image is sent to a monitor. Used in civil or military aviation or ground vehicle systems, the M598 is ideal for a number of graphics-intensive display computing environments. These include fixed- and rotary-wing mission and cockpit display computers and heads-up displays as well as electro-optical (EO) video camera, EO night vision and Infrared (IR) video frame grabbing, multi-role tactical mission displays found in advanced 2D and 3D C4ISR and EW video processing systems.

AMD Reveals World's First Hardware-Virtualized GPU Product Line

AMD today revealed the world's first hardware virtualized GPU products -- AMD FirePro S-Series GPUs with Multiuser GPU (MxGPU) technology. AMD's ground-breaking hardware-virtualized GPU architecture delivers an innovative solution in response to emerging user experiences such as remote workstation, cloud gaming, cloud computing, and Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI).

In the virtualization ecosystem, key components like the CPU, network controller and storage devices are being virtualized in hardware to deliver optimal user experiences, but prior to today the GPU was not hardware virtualized. AMD MxGPU technology, for the first time, brings the modern virtualization industry standard to the GPU hardware. What does this mean? Consistent performance and enhanced security across virtual machines. MxGPU controls GPU scheduling delivering predictable quality of service to the user.

JEDEC Announces Publication of GDDR5X Graphics Memory Standard

JEDEC Solid State Technology Association, the global leader in the development of standards for the microelectronics industry, today announced the publication of JESD232 Graphics Double Data Rate (GDDR5X) SGRAM. Available for free download from the JEDEC website, the new memory standard is designed to satisfy the increasing need for more memory bandwidth in graphics, gaming, compute, and networking applications.

Derived from the widely adopted GDDR5 SGRAM JEDEC standard, GDDR5X specifies key elements related to the design and operability of memory chips for applications requiring very high memory bandwidth. With the intent to address the needs of high-performance applications demanding ever higher data rates, GDDR5X is targeting data rates of 10 to 14 Gb/s, a 2X increase over GDDR5. In order to allow a smooth transition from GDDR5, GDDR5X utilizes the same, proven pseudo open drain (POD) signaling as GDDR5.

"GDDR5X represents a significant leap forward for high end GPU design," said Mian Quddus, JEDEC Board of Directors Chairman. "Its performance improvements over the prior standard will help enable the next generation of graphics and other high-performance applications."

MSI Announces the Gaming 24 AIO Desktop

MSI proudly presents the upgraded Gaming All-in-One PC: MSI Gaming 24. Equipped with more powerful hardware than its predecessor, this system is capable and ready to run the newest PC games in full glory. The large 24" Full HD display offers an outstanding gaming experience with fast response times for improved gaming performance. By using the HDMI input, the display can also be used to connect a game console. The display also comes with MSI Anti-flicker technology, to prevent screen flickering and blue light emission through a smartly stabilized power current, thereby reducing eyestrain and fatigue.

The MSI Gaming 24 utilizes Intel's new Skylake-H platform enabling a better CPU performance with reduced power consumption. It supports up to 32 GB dual-channel DDR4 memory to take care of the most demanding tasks. To run the newest games, the system is equipped with a NVIDIA GeForce GTX 950M or 960M graphics chip. This time with 4GB GDDR5 memory, which is twice as much as its predecessor. The Gaming 24 features the next generation Intel Wireless-AC 3165 Wi-Fi adapter and Killer E2400 Ethernet. Ensuring faster network speeds and prioritization of network traffic for online games.

AMD Announces the FirePro W4300 Professional Graphics Card

Today at Autodesk University 2015, AMD (NASDAQ: AMD) unveiled the AMD FirePro W4300 for the best Computer-Aided Design (CAD) performance that fits both small form factor (SFF) and tower workstations. The AMD FirePro W4300 card expertly integrates a powerful GPU and 4GB of GDDR5 memory within a low-profile design for installation in SFF as well as full-sized systems. Organizations can now confidently simplify their IT management by standardizing on a single, capable professional graphics solution throughout their workstation deployment.

The AMD FirePro W4300 professional graphics card is optimized for the latest CAD applications including Autodesk AutoCAD, Inventor as well as Revit, Dassault Systèmes SOLIDWORKS and CATIA, PTC Creo, Siemens NX, and many more. Engineering professionals can efficiently work with large geometry-intense models and apply GPU-accelerated features in their projects, such as the new Order Independent Transparency (OIT) mode supported in SOLIDWORKS. Users can help increase productivity by visualizing their workflows across up to six displays, and up to 4K and 5K resolution.

Three AIB Branded Radeon R9 380X Graphics Cards Pictured

Here are the first pictures of three AIB-branded Radeon R9 380X graphics cards, including one each from ASUS, XFX, and GIGABYTE. The ASUS branded Radeon R9 380X graphics card, the R9 380X STRIX, features the company's dual-slot, dual-fan DirectCU II cooling solution. ASUS is also giving it a slick back-plate, and offering it in two variants based on factory-overclock (or lack of it).

The XFX branded R9 380X features a similar product size to the ASUS card, featuring a moderately long PCB, and a dual-slot, dual-fan "Double Dissipation" cooler. XFX will sell variants of this card in reference and factory-overclocked speeds. Lastly, there's GIGABYTE. Like the others, this card features a medium-size PCB, with the company's dual-slot WindForce 2X cooling solution. Based on the 28 nm "Tonga" aka "Antigua" silicon, the R9 380X reportedly features 2,048 GCN 1.2 stream processors, 128 TMUs, 32 ROPs, and a 256-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, holding 4 GB of memory. It's expected to launch later this week.
Souces: VideoCardz, HardwareInfo, WCCFTech

GDDR5X Puts Up a Fight Against HBM, AMD and NVIDIA Mulling Implementations

There's still a little bit of fight left in the GDDR5 ecosystem against the faster and more energy-efficient HBM standard, which has a vast and unexplored performance growth curve. The new GDDR5X standard offers double the bandwidth per-pin compared to current generation GDDR5, without any major design or electrical changes, letting GPU makers make a seamless and cost-effective transition to it.

In a presentation by a DRAM maker leaked to the web, GDDR5X is touted as offering double the data-rate per memory access, at 64 byte/access, compared to 32 byte/access by today's fastest GDDR5 standard, which is currently saturating its clock/voltage curve at 7 Gbps. GDDR5X breathes a new lease of live to the ageing DRAM standard, offering 10-12 Gbps initially, with a goal of 16 Gbps in the long term. GDDR5X chips will have identical pin layouts to their predecessors, and hence it should cost GPU makers barely any R&D to implement them.

MSI Launches the Nightblade X2 and MI2 Gaming Desktops

As the leading gaming hardware brand, MSI is excited to launch a new generation of gaming desktop PC's: the MSI Nightblade X2 and MI2. The Nightblade series embody what every gamer craves for: victory. The MSI Nightblade PCs stand out - or better said; do not stand out - because of their size. The Nightblade X2 has a volume of only 16 liters and its smaller brother, the Nightblade MI, comes in an astonishing 10 liter sized shell. Despite their nifty dimensions, the Nightblade X2 & MI2 both house a full sized MSI graphics card. Coupled with Intel Core technology and smart cooling solutions, the MSI Nightblade series are an excellent choice for gaming enthusiasts around the world.

With a full sized graphics card, the Nightblade X2 & MI2 both bring grand graphics for gamers in a small case. While the MI2 equips a GTX 970 with 4GB GDDR5 memory the X2 even comes with the powerful GeForce GTX 980 TI. These graphics cards provide plenty of FPS while playing games in Full HD and in high settings. To top it off, the Nightblade series come with more features such as Intel Core i5 or i7 CPU, the latest Nahimic Sound Technology, M.2 SSD and Super RAID compatibility and MSI Gaming Center software. The next generation MSI Nightblade series are complete and ready-to-go gaming systems and will be available worldwide from the middle of October.

AMD Expands Embedded Graphics Lineup

AMD today announced multiple new discrete AMD Embedded Radeon graphics options suitable for multiple form factors. The suite of products is specifically designed to advance the visual and parallel processing capabilities of embedded applications. The graphics cards represent continued AMD commitment to embedded market innovation, providing engineers with more choices to achieve their design goals, from leading performance to energy efficiency.

The new offerings cover a broad range of needs, from 192 GFLOPS to 3 TFLOPS of single precision performance, and from 20 to less than 95 watts of thermal design power. The products are offered as a Multi-Chip Module (MCM), Mobile PCI Express Module (MXM) and PCIe options, with AMD offering the only MCM solutions. All of these products offer extended support and longevity. The new discrete graphics cards offer the right balance of performance, power and graphics memory size, to meet the needs of most customers.

"The demand for rich, vibrant graphics in embedded systems is greater than ever before, and that demand is growing," said Scott Aylor, corporate vice president and general manager, AMD Embedded Solutions. "Our latest additions to the embedded product lineup help designers build mesmerizing user experiences with 4K multi-screen installations and 3-D and interactive displays. In addition, the powerful capabilities of our GPUs can address the toughest parallel compute challenges."

PowerColor Launches Radeon R9 390 X2 Devil13 Dual-GPU Graphics Card

TUL Corporation, a leading and innovative manufacturer of AMD graphic cards since 1997, has proudly announced a new and most powerful graphics card in the world among AMD Radeon R9 390 series. The PowerColor Devil 13 Dual Core R9 390 is packed with dual GRENADA core, designed to tackle the most demanding high end gaming titles on the market. It utilizes 16 GB of GDDR5 memory with a core clock speed at 1000 MHz, and 1350 MHz for memory clock speed which is connected via a new high speed 1024-bit (512-bit x2) memory interface.

PowerColor Devil 13 Dual Core R9 390 is built with carefully-designed Platinum Power Kit and ultra-efficient thermal design. It consists of massive 15-phase power delivery, PowerIRstage, Super Cap and Ferrite Core Choke that provides the stability and reliability for such high-end graphics solution. To support maximum performance and to qualify for the Devil 13 cooling system, 3 Double Blades Fans are attached on top of the enormous surface of aluminum fins heatsink connected with total of 10 pieces of heat pipes and 2 pieces of large die-cast panels. This superb cooling solution achieves a perfect balance between thermal solution and noise reduction. The PowerColor Devil 13 Dual Core R9 390 has the LED backlighting that glows a bright red color, pulsating slowly on the Devil 13 logo.

Radeon R9 390X Taken Apart, PCB Reveals a Complete Re-brand

People with access to an XFX Radeon R9 390X graphics card, took it apart to take a peek at its PCB. What they uncovered comes as no surprise - the underlying PCB is identical in design to AMD reference PCB for the Radeon R9 290X, down the location of every tiny SMT component. At best, the brands on the chokes and bigger conductive polymer caps differ; and 512 Gbit GDDR5 chips under the heatspreader, making up 8 GB of the standard memory amount. The GPU itself, codenamed "Grenada," looks identical to the "Hawaii" silicon which drove the R9 290 series. It's highly unlikely that it features updated Graphics CoreNext 1.2 stream processors, as older rumors suggested.

AMD "Fiji" HBM Implementation Detailed

Back in 2008, when it looked like NVIDIA owned the GPU market, and AMD seemed lagging behind on the performance and efficiency game, the company sprung a surprise. The company's RV770 silicon, the first GPU to implement GDDR5 memory, trounced NVIDIA's big and inefficient GeForce GTX 200 series, and threw AMD back in the game. GDDR5 helped the company double the memory bandwidth, with lower pin- and memory-chip counts, letting the company and its partners build graphics cards with fewer components, and earn great margins, which the company invested in development of its even better HD 5000 series, that pushed NVIDIA with its comical GeForce GTX 480, to hit its lowest ever in market-share. Could AMD be looking at a similar turnaround this summer?

Since the introduction of its Graphics CoreNext architecture in 2012, AMD has been rather laxed in its product development cycle. The company has come out with a new high-end silicon every 18-24 months, and adopted a strategy of cascading re-branding. The introduction of each new high-end silicon would relegate the existing high-end silicon to the performance segment re-branded, and the existing performance-segment silicon to mid-range, re-branded. While the company could lay out its upcoming Radeon R9 series much in the same way, with the introduction of essentially just one new silicon, "Fiji," it could just prove enough for the company. Much like RV770, "Fiji" is about to bring something that could prove to be a very big feature to the consumer graphics market, stacked high-bandwidth memory (HBM).

AMD Readies 14 nm FinFET GPUs in 2016

At its ongoing Investor Day presentation, AMD announced that will continue to make GPUs for every segment of the market. The company is planning to leverage improvements to its Graphics CoreNext architecture for the foreseeable future, but is betting on a huge performance/Watt increase with its 2016 GPUs. The secret sauce here will be the shift to 14 nm FinFET process. It's important to note here, that AMD refrained from mentioning "14 nm," but the mention of FinFET is a reliable giveaway. AMD is expecting a 2x (100%) gain in performance/Watt over its current generation of GPUs, with the shift.

AMD's future GPUs will focus on several market inflection points, such as the arrival of CPU-efficient graphics APIs such as DirectX 12 and Vulkan, Windows 10 pulling users from Windows 7, 4K Ultra HD displays getting more affordable (perhaps even mainstream), which it believes will help it sell enough GPUs to return to profitability. The company also announced an unnamed major design win, which will take shape in this quarter, and which will hit the markets in 2016.

AMD Radeon R9 380 Launched by PC OEM

Earlier this day, HP announced its newest line of desktop PCs, one of which comes with a curious-sounding Radeon R9 380 graphics card. HP's product pages for its new desktops aren't active, yet, leaving us to only speculate on what the R9 380 could be. One theory making rounds says that the R9 380 could either be a re-branded R9 285, or be based on its "Tonga" silicon, which physically features 2,048 stream processors based on Graphics CoreNext (GCN) 1.2 architecture, and a 384-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface. Another theory states that the R9 380 could be an OEM-only re-brand of the R9 280 or R9 280X, based on the 3+ year old "Tahiti" silicon.

The former theory sounds more plausible, because re-branding a "Tahiti" based product would be suicidal for AMD. Although based on GCN, "Tahiti" lacks a lot of architecture features introduced with "Hawaii" and "Tonga." AMD practically stopped optimizing games for "Tahiti," and some of its new features, such as FreeSync and XDMA CrossFire, can't be implemented on it. "Tonga," on the other hand, supports both these features, and one can create an SKU with all its 2,048 stream processors, and its full 384-bit GDDR5 memory interface unlocked. If the R9 380 is indeed an OEM-only product, then it's likely that the company's retail-channel products could be branded in the succeeding R9 400 series. GPU makers tend to re-brand and bump their SKUs by a series for OEMs to peddle in their "new" products at short notice.

Eurocom Ships Shark 4 Ultraportable Notebook with GTX 960M Graphics

Eurocom has launched and is now shipping the 15.6" Shark 4 Ultraportable laptop with NVIDIA GeForce GTX 960M graphics with 2 GB GDDR5, Intel Core i7-4720HQ processor and an optical drive, all in a slim 1.1 inch chassis. "The EUROCOM Shark 4 is another impressive addition to our line of thin and light upgradeable, ultraportable laptops designed to offer high levels of performance in addition to sleek and classy designs as well as ultra-portability and ease of use." Mark Bialic, Eurocom President.

The EUROCOM Shark 4 is one of the few new laptops with an optical drive - we recognized this need for many customers so we listened by offering the Shark 4 with an upgradeable optical drive that can be a DVD drive, Blu-Ray drive or an additional storage drive bay. Upgradeability is a core tenet of all Eurocom systems; the Shark 4 is no different with upgradeable memory, storage, display, wireless card and keyboard. The EUROCOM Shark 4 supports two memory modules for up to 16 GB of DDR3-1600 memory and one M.2 SSD SATA PCIe Gen2 x2/x4 and two 9.5 mm HDD/SSD SATA for up to 2.512 TB of storage.

NVIDIA Unveils the GeForce GTX TITAN-X

NVIDIA surprised everyone at its GDC 2015 event, by unveiling its flagship graphics card based on the "Maxwell" architecture, the GeForce GTX TITAN-X. Although the unveiling was no formal product launch, and it didn't come with a disclosure of specs, but a look at the card itself, and a claim by no less than NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang, that the card will be faster than the current-gen dual-GPU GTX TITAN-Z, there are some highly plausible rumors about its specs doing the rounds.

The GTX TITAN-X is a single-GPU graphics card, expected to be based on the company's GM200 silicon. This chip is rumored to feature 3,072 CUDA cores based on the "Maxwell" architecture, and a 384-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, holding 12 GB of memory. NVIDIA is likely taking advantage of new 8 Gb GDDR5 chips. Even otherwise, achieving 12 GB using 4 Gb chips isn't impossible. The card itself looks nearly identical to the GTX TITAN Black, with its nickel alloy cooler shroud, with two differences - the "TITAN" marking towards the front of the card glows white, while the fan is decked with green lights, in addition to green glowing "GeForce GTX" logo on the top. You get to control the lighting via GeForce Experience. NVIDIA plans to run more demos of the card throughout the week.

Samsung Starts Mass Producing Industry's First 8 Gb GDDR5 Memory

Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., the world leader in advanced memory technology, announced today that it has begun mass producing the industry's first 8 gigabit (Gb) GDDR5 DRAM, based on the company's leading-edge 20-nanometer (nm) process technology. GDDR5 is the most widely used discrete graphics memory in the world.

Designed for use in graphics cards for PCs and supercomputing applications, and on-board graphics memory for game consoles and notebook PCs, discrete graphics DRAM provides an extensive amount of bandwidth to process large high quality graphically-oriented data streams. With the rising popularity of 3-D games and UHD video content soon to be widespread, the need for high-performance, high-bandwidth graphics memory has begun to rapidly increase.

Club3D Announces Radeon R9 290X royalAce 8GB Graphics Card

It's been a year since the AMD Hawaii cards hit the market. The Radeon R9 290 and 290X reached a new level of performance and were the first cards aimed at gaming in 4K Ultra High Definition resolution. Club 3D launched PokerSeries versions of the R9 290 and 290X, targeted at gamers who demand the best looks, the highest framerates, the best cooling performance and great value for money. With the recent price adjustments the Club 3D R9 290(X) royalKing and royalAce versions now offer the highest performance ever at their respective price points.

But we have another Ace up our sleeve, a new member of the highly awarded PokerSeries family. Today we are proud to announce the Club 3D R9 290X 8Gb royalAce, the world's first Single GPU Gaming Card featuring 8192Mb GDDR5 memory. It's OverClocked out of the box for the best performance and packs the latest AMD Graphics Core Next technologies like True Audio, Powertune, XDMA and support for AMD's revolutionary Mantle API. The royalAce is beautifully designed and constructed and is fitted with a triple fan CoolStream cooler and a custom backplate which make it stand out in any serious gaming system.
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