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Prototype AMD Vega RX 56 Triple-Fan Graphics Card Pictured

Trying to keep our community entertained and distracted from the growing pains and expectations of waiting for the death of AMD's imposed NDAs on Vega reviews is one of our missions. As such, while we know what you want are actual performance numbers, price/performance charts, and an in-depth, independent review, you'll not find such answers in this post. You will find, however, some interesting tidbits on AMD RX Vega designs. In this case, a triple-fan cooling solution for AMD's RX Vega 56 (the smaller Vega).

Noctua Shows Off LGA2066-ready Retention Modules

Noctua showed off protoypes of variants of its various high-end CPU coolers, which come with support for Intel's Core X family socket LGA2066 processors. While LGA2066 has a higher pin-count, it has the same exact CPU cooler mount-hole spacing as LGA2011(v3), and as such, any LGA2011-compatible cooler should run on LGA2066. All Core i7 LGA2011(v3) chips are either 140W or below. Noctua on its part, is confident that that all its LGA2011(v3)-compatible coolers run on LGA2066 by default, and is willing to giveaway LGA2066-supporting SecuFirm 2 retention modules for free, for users of older Noctua heatsinks which can handle such high thermal loads.

SilverStone Raven Z RVZ04 Prototype Pictured

The next in the long line of prototype cases at the SilverStone booth is the latest iteration of the SFF prodigy by the company, the Raven Z RVZ04. Its design is bolder than the current Raven Z, and encloses a micro-STX form-factor motherboard. This is a tiny 1U form-factor with DIY boards far a few between, but SilverStone's creation had a Core "Kaby Lake" quad-core processor, and a discrete graphics card. It doesn't have any storage areas of its own, and relies on any M.2 or mSATA slots on the motherboard. The case measures 238 mm x 81 mm x 199 mm (WxHxD), or about the size of a game console.

SilverStone Primera PM02 Prototype Detailed

SilverStone also showed off a prototype of its second-generation Primera series "stylish" ATX mid-tower cases. The case features an all-steel construction, including its front door. The front is characterized by vertical slits and a silvery finish. The side is dominated by a black-tinted tempered glass panel. The case measures 220 mm x 490 mm x 473 mm (WxHxD). Under the hood, you get three 3.5-inch drive bays (which convert to 2.5-inch), three 2.5-inch mounts, and five 140 mm fan mounts, with an included 140 mm fan. A curious-looking IR remote was placed near this case with RGB LED (color/brightness), system power, and fan-speed controls. We're not sure if it's included with the case.

SilverStone Redline RL07 Series Prototypes Pictured

Here are some of the first pictures of SilverStone's Redline RL07 case prototypes. These stylish ATX mid-towers come in black with a dash of red, and white with a dash of blue, and are characterized by the front vertical dividing crease with LED inserts. The case is made almost entirely of SECC steel (including the front), while its side panel is made of tempered glass. The case measures 230 mm x 488 mm x 482 mm (WxHxD).

Under the hood, the SilverStone RL07 features three 3.5-inch HDD bays (which each convert to 2.5-inch), and three 2.5-inch mounts. Cooling system is bolstered by an all-140 mm mount layout. The case features a total of five 140 mm fan mounts, a 140 mm fan comes included with it. Front panel connectivity includes two each of USB 3.1/3.0 type-A, and USB 2.0/1.1 ports, and HDA jacks.

Lian Li PC-V3000 Prototype Chassis Pictured

Here are some of the first pictures of Lian Li PC-V3000, the company's upcoming flagship chassis. Characterized by Lian Li's favorite material, aluminium, the case features the company's signature design language, with dark, brushed-aluminium exteriors, and silvery aluminium interiors. The company released pictures of a prototype case, with a final release out later this year. Keeping up with the times (i.e. horizontal partition), the PC-V3000 features a vast twin-compartment layout, only that the motherboard layout is inverted (opens out at the right side, with the motherboard being positioned BTX-style).

The Lian Li PC-V3000 has room for ATX and E-ATX motherboards, with room for graphics cards with lengths in the neighborhood of 40 cm, and coolers with heights around 20 cm. The bottom compartment is further partitioned vertically, with the left-side compartment housing the PSU bay and a 3x 3.5-inch drive-cage; while the right-side compartment either serves up room for your liquid cooling gear (such as a 420 mm x 140 mm radiator), or additional 2.5-inch drives. The motherboard tray has three drive mounts on its reverse side. Cooling includes 3x 140 mm side intake, 120 mm rear exhaust, and 3x 120 mm top exhausts.

Noctua Unveils Prototype Large Socket Heatsink for Xeon and Opteron Chips

Noctua unveiled a prototype fin-stack heatsink for very large CPU socket types, such as Intel Socket P (LGA3647) and AMD SP3, powering chips such as Intel Xeon Phi "Knights Landing," and upcoming AMD Opteron SP3 32-core SoCs. There will be 3U and 4U versions of this heatsink, supporting NF-A9 (92 mm) and NF-F12 (120 mm) fans. The heatsink is just a very large aluminium fin-stack, to which heat drawn from the base is fed by seven 8 mm thick nickel-plated copper heat pipes.

Noctua Unveils a Prototype 120 mm Slim Fan

Noctua unveiled a prototype slim 120 mm fan. The fan is just 15 mm thick (25 mm is the most common thickness for 120 mm fans). The fan features a metal reinforced hub, to make sure the hub and its four support structures don't disfigure over time. The motor features double ball bearing. The frame features a design that minimizes noise from the whiplash of the impeller. The frame further features rubber padding along the mount holes, to dampen vibration. Noctua did not put out fan-speed and air-flow numbers for this fan.

AMD Demoes Dual "Fiji" Based Desktops at VRLA, Super Compact

At the Virtual Reality Los Angeles (VRLA) event, AMD along with a few gaming PC manufacturers demonstrated their desktop builds featuring the company's upcoming dual-GPU graphics card driven by a pair of "Fiji" GPUs. Among the desktops demoed include a prototype Falcon Northwest Tiki compact gaming desktop with a dual-Fiji graphics card, and HTC Vive HMD. Falcon Northwest commented that the dual-GPU "Fiji" graphics card is small enough to squeeze into its 4-inch thick Tiki, indicating that the card will be super-compact. AMD is expected to launch the dual-GPU "Fiji" graphics card some time in Q2 2016.

Source: WCCFTech

AMD "Zen" CPU Prototypes Tested, "Meet all Expectations"

AMD reportedly finished testing some of its first "Zen" micro-architecture CPU prototypes, and concluded that they "meet all expectations," with "no significant bottlenecks found" in its design. This should mean that AMD's "Zen" chips should be as competitive with Intel chips as it set them out to be. The company is planning to launch its first client CPUs based on the "Zen" micro-architecture in 2016, based on its swanky new AM4 socket, with DDR4 memory and integrated PCIe (a la APUs). Zen sees AMD revert to the large, monolithic core design, from its "Bulldozer" multi-core module design with a near doubling of number-crunching machinery per-core, compared to its preceding architecture.

Source: OC3D.net

Qualcomm Announces its First Socketed Enterprise CPU

Qualcomm, which holds a ton of ARM SoC patents, and put them to good use with its Snapdragon line of SoCs for smartphones, tablets, and convertible notebooks, is foraying into enterprise computing market. The company is ready with its first prototype of a 24-core high-performance CPU based on the 64-bit ARM machine architecture. ARM-based processors are picking up momentum in the server and micro-server markets owning to their low cost, low cooling requirements, and high energy-efficiency; and Qualcomm wants a slice of that pie. Most enterprise Linux and FreeBSD distributors have versions of their server operating systems for the 64-bit ARM architecture, as do most popular server software providers.

The prototype 24-core CPU is socketed, and ships in a large land-grid array (LGA) package, much like Intel's Xeon chips. The first production chips will have a lot more than 24 CPU cores, said Qualcomm senior vice president Anand Chandrasekhar. As a proof of concept, Qualcomm assembled three server blades using these chips, which were running Linux with a KVM hypervisor, streaming HD video to a PC using a LAMP stack (Linux + Apache + MySQL + PHP) built with OpenStack. Qualcomm's target consumers are big Internet companies like Google and Facebook, which purchase hundreds of thousands of CPUs each year to cope with growing user- and content-traffic.

Source: PC World

Crono Labs Designs Case Transforming Monitors into Monster Gaming AIOs

Crono Labs is a new crowd-funded startup that's on a mission to turn monitors with VESA mounts into AIO-looking, gaming monstrosities. Their contraption is a lightweight micro-ATX chassis that mounts on to the back of your monitor over standard VESA mounts, and houses a micro-ATX or mini-ITX motherboard, a standard ATX PSU (with reasonable length restrictions), two each of 3.5-inch and 2.5-inch drive bays, and a 2-slot graphics card bay that's arranged along the plane of the motherboard, rather than perpendicular to it, using a PCIe riser. It has room for graphics cards as long as 10.5 inches (26.67 cm).

It comes with its own sturdy stand, so you needn't worry about a >10 lbs object (the case and your build) weighing in on your monitor's frail stand. The case is airy along its sides and is topped off with a groovy brushed-aluminium panel. Then there are nifty bits like the handle. Crono Labs is seeking as little as $2,000 to get build prototypes, on its Indiegogo campaign, it's already halfway through that goal, but your coins could help. Check them out here.

Intel Readies First Consumer SSD Based on 3D Xpoint Memory

Intel plans to launch the first consumer SSD based on its new 3D Xpoint memory technology, a successor to NAND flash which promises exponential gains in performance and capacity, some time in 2016. The Intel-branded drive will be called Intel Optane, will come in modern form-factors such as M.2/NGFF, SATA-Express, PCI-Express (add-on card), and will take advantage of the new NVMe protocol.

Early prototypes of Optane demoed at IDF already offer up to 5.5 times the throughput of NAND flash-based DC P3700 series SSDs, and we're only talking about single-queue performance. Compared to the queue depth of just 32 commands for AHCI, NVMe offers command queue depth of a staggering 65,535 commands. Since Micron Technology is the co-developer of 3D Xpoint, it's likely that we'll also see Micron/Crucial branded drives based on this tech.

Source: The TechReport

Noctua Unveils Two New U-type CPU Cooler Prototypes

Noctua unveiled two new tower-type (U-type in Noctua-speak) CPU cooler prototypes, based on a new asymmetric design, which creates additional clearance over the memory slots area in a conventional motherboard. The 120 mm version is based on the NH-U12S, with heat pipes bent in a way that pushes the fin-stack a little off-center from the base; creating headroom for memory modules. The 140 mm version features a similar design, and is derived from the NH-U14S.

The 120 mm version offers 50% more surface area for heat dissipation than the NH-U12S; while the 140 mm version offer 30% more surface area than the NH-U14S. Both coolers, offer 100% clearance for memory modules. The 140 mm version has the fin-stack slanted away from not just the memory modules, but also the expansion slots, so the cooler doesn't eat into the topmost PCI-Express slot of your motherboard. Both coolers will feature next-generation 120 mm and 140 mm fans by the company.

NVIDIA Tapes Out "Pascal" Based GP100 Silicon

Sources tell 3DCenter.org that NVIDIA has successfully taped out its next big silicon based on its upcoming "Pascal" GPU architecture, codenamed GP100. A successor to GM200, this chip will be the precursor to several others based on this architecture. A tape-out means that the company has successfully made a tiny quantity of working prototypes for internal testing and further development. It's usually seen as a major milestone in a product development cycle.

With "Pascal," NVIDIA will pole-vault HBM1, which is making its debut with AMD's "Fiji" silicon; and jump straight to HBM2, which will allow SKU designers to cram up to 32 GB of video memory. 3DCenter.org speculates that GP100 could feature anywhere between 4,500 to 6,000 CUDA cores. The chip will be built on TSMC's upcoming 16 nanometer silicon fab process, which will finally hit the road by 2016. The GP100, and its companion performance-segment silicon, the GP104 (successor to GM204), are expected to launch between Q2 and Q3, 2016.

Source: 3DCenter.org

Thermaltake Draws Flack for Ripping Off Other Brands' Products

Thermaltake, a brand that has been associated with DIY PC for decades, is accused of blatantly copying designs of other [smaller albeit popular] brands' products, with some of the new products it unveiled at Computex 2015. It begins with the Suppressor F51, a case that was launched just a month before Computex, and was widely reviewed by the media. Our readers almost instantly noticed (and we agree) that the Suppressor F51 bears an uncanny resemblance to the Define R5, a pioneering case by Fractal Design. We could excuse similarities to an extant, but it appears that Thermaltake copied even intricate design details.

Legit Reviews compiled a list of other products Thermaltake copied in a similar way. These include its Riing series fans, which resemble Corsair Air Series 120 mm; the Commander FT fan-controller copies some UI design elements from the NZXT Sentry 3; and the most blatant rip-off being the W2 CPU water block, which looks identical to the Swiftech Apogee XL. Perhaps the biggest victim of this episode is CaseLabs. A very small player in the PC case industry, CaseLabs is critically acclaimed, and loved by PC enthusiasts to come up with some of the most original high-end case designs. The company's Merlin SM8 and TH10 cases are copied by Thermaltake into two of its prototype cases exhibited at Computex. These examples alone are class-action bait that, if pursued, could lead to a trade-ban for Thermaltake in markets such as the US and EU.

Source: LegitReviews

PowerColor Shows Off its Devil Hybrid Cooling Solution

PowerColor showed off its latest custom graphics card cooling solution, the Devil Hybrid. This particular sample was shown off on a Radeon R9 290X-based prototype, which will likely never make it to the market, because AMD AIB partners cannot unveil "Fiji" based parts just yet; but is expected to feature on AMD's upcoming graphics cards. The Devil Hybrid is a combination of an AIO liquid-based GPU block, and a conventional temperature-activated single fan heatsink for the VRM. The GPU block is plumbed to a 120 mm radiator, with a PWM spinner included. Given that such a setup could tame the R9 295X2, it could prove adequate for a single GPU.

Find a Cooler PC Case. Pro Tip: You Can't

On the first day of Computex, we sifted past the In Win 909, which at the time, we thought was a wacky enough case by In Win for this year; until the company dropped this on us, the next day. This unnamed In Win case (working title: "H-tower prototype") is being designed with the ASUS ROG brand licensed; which could be sold directly to the consumers, and part of an ASUS ROG desktop. The case looks like any heavily styled ATX mid-tower with premium aluminium panels, until you push a button, making the case open up like a blooming mech-flower from Cybertron, giving you easy access to its innards. There was nobody around the exhibit who wasn't gaping at it.
The way it opens up is so cool that we decided to take a short video (after the break).

Streacom Unveils Prototype Symmetrical Case

Streacom showed off a unique new prototype case, which you can place upside down or downside up in tower orientation; or even either ways in pedestal orientation; and the case would still maintain its rigidity and design. The unnamed prototype is made of 4 mm-thick aluminium panels, and can seat ATX motherboards, with standard ATX-type PSUs. The case lacks air vents in all its panels, except the top and bottom. The PSU bay vents out on the panel. It comes with a rail system, just like the F12C, which allows for plenty of hard drives to be installed without the need of drive bays. The same parts may be used for pumps or reservoirs. The case prototype looked nearly finished even though it was hand-made, and when released later this year, could cost anywhere between $250-300.

Lian Li Giving a Sneak Peak of the Latest Desk and O Series Chassis at CeBIT '15

Lian-Li Industrial Co. Ltd is pleased to announce that prototypes of the latest O Series Chassis and Desk Chassis will be on display at CeBIT 2015. Lian Li invites all to get a sneak peak at its booth (Hall 17, D26) of the latest editions of the some of the most talked about chassis lines.

Combining the symbiotic relationship of desks and computer cases, the DK-01 and DK-02 were the first desk chassis to be brought to the mainstream market. Now, almost a year after their initial release, Lian Li will be debuting a desk chassis prototype, DK-Q2, that is a result of user feedback. Major updates include a removable motherboard tray, new leg design, and a slimmer body.

8K A Great Challenge: NVIDIA and AMD

Even as 4K Ultra HD (3840 x 2160) is beginning to enter the consumer mainstream, with 28-inch displays being priced around $600, and Apple toying with 5K (5120 x 2880), with its next-generation iMac Retina desktops, Japanese display maker Sharp threw a spanner in the works, by unveiling a working prototype of its 8K (7680 x 4320 pixels) display, at the CETAC trade-show, held in Japan.

Two of the industry's biggest graphics processor makers, NVIDIA and AMD, reacted similarly to the development, calling 8K "a great challenge." Currently, neither company has a GPU that can handle the resolution. 8K is four times as many pixels as 4K. Driving an Ultra HD display over DVI needs two TMDS links, and DisplayPort 1.2 and HDMI 2.0 have just enough bandwidth to drive Ultra HD at 60 Hz. To drive 8K, both NVIDIA and AMD believe you would need more than one current-generation GPU, the display should connect to both cards over independent connectors, and somehow treat the single display as four Ultra HD displays. We imagine Sharp demoed its display at a very low refresh rate, to compensate for the bandwidth limitation. After 10 years of Full-HD tyranny, display resolutions are finally beginning to see their normal rate of development. It's time now for GPU developers and display interconnects to keep up.

Source: Expreview

Lian Li Shows Off PC-05, PC-06, and PC-07 Case Prototypes

Lian Li showed off prototypes of its new breed of cases, which can be used either as flat-bed open-air cases, or as towers. These include the mini-ITX PC-05, the micro-ATX PC-06, and the ATX PC-07. Their design is extremely simple. A tub-shaped metal structure holds key PC components along its tray, while a tempered glass panel tops it off. You can either place the case flat-on, making it an open-air case with its clear-acrylic panel removed, or you can place it along its side, to resemble a tower. The three feature a forward-oriented standard ATX PSU bay, a slimline optical drive bay, two or more 3.5-inch/2.5-inch drive bays, and a PCI-Express 3.0 x16 riser, letting you install a graphics card. Lian Li is seeking feedback that will help it perfect the three. Leave them in the comments.

MSI TwinFrozr V Cooling Solution Teased

MSI teased the first CGI sketches of its next-generation TwinFrozr V cooling solution, designed for high-end GPUs, under its Gaming Series. A prototype of the cooler made its first appearance at Computex 2014, in June. The cooler features a large dual-stack aluminium fin heatsink to which heat drawn from the GPU is fed by five 8 mm thick nickel-plated copper heat pipes. The fin-stack is ventilated by a pair of what's now appearing to be two 100 mm fans. MSI is rumored to be innovating a new impeller design that steps up air-flow to noise ratio.

It's interesting to note that in its CGI render of a card equipped with this cooler, MSI showed a PCB with two NVIDIA SLI bridge fingers, and two 6-pin PCIe power inputs. Could this be the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980, in effect making the card the MSI GTX 980 Gaming OC? Wait until the 19th of September to find out. GeForce GTX 980 and GTX 970 are NVIDIA's next high-end GPUs, based on the 28 nm "GM204" silicon, derived from the company's new "Maxwell" architecture.

Source: MyDrivers

ADATA DDR4 OC Module Spotted on a Working Haswell-E HEDT System

ADATA's claim of being the first memory maker with DDR4 overclocking modules wouldn't fly with anyone, if they weren't using a live Haswell-E HEDT platform to show it off. The system appears to be using a prototype Intel X99 chipset micro-ATX motherboard by ASRock, and a Haswell-E engineering sample. The module comes with JEDEC SPD profile of 2133 MHz, but claims to offer tons of overclocking headroom. The system was wired to a display, and evidently, CPU-Z can't read the memory config. It can, however, read out DRAM clock and timings. The system was doing 1373 MHz (2746 MHz DDR), with timings of 14-14-14-36-CR2T.
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