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Intel Core i7-11700 "Rocket Lake" Tested Some More: Competition for 5800X Firms Up

Odd Tech Reviews published a performance review of an Intel Core i7-11700 (non-K) "employee beta sample." This review comes on the heels of a Lab501.ro review of an unlocked i7-11700K engineering sample; and yet springs a different set of results in relation to the AMD Ryzen 7 5800X. The i7-11700 is shown having a slight edge over the 5800X in both the single- and multi-threaded tests of the CPU-Z Bench, where it's shown posting a 3.59% higher single-threaded score.

The Ryzen 7 5800X retakes the lead over the Core i7-11700 sample in Cinebench R15 and R20, posting higher scores in both the single- and multi-threaded tests. The 5800X also maintains lead with 7-Zip. Blender sees the i7-11700 once again run past the 5800X, but the AMD chip claws back with V-Ray and Handbrake video-encoding tests. There's a pitched battle between the 5800X and the i7-11700 with gaming, with each chip having an upper hand over the other, depending on the test. Find all these results and more in the Odd Tech Reviews presentation.

First Comprehensive Review of the Core i7-11700K (ES) Surfaces

Lab501 posted the first comprehensive review of an Intel Core i7-11700K "Rocket Lake-S" engineering sample. The ES has clock speeds matching the rumored clock speeds of the retail version, and should give you a fair idea of how the finished product should perform. The i7-11700K, which is an 8-core/16-thread chip, was tested to be being consistently behind the AMD Ryzen 7 5800X in synthetics such as WPrime, rendering tests such as Blender, video-encoding tests such as Handbrake, and was negligibly trading blows with the 5800X at gaming ±1%. The chip does post leads over the previous-gen i7-10700K in all these areas, though.

Performance aside, the Core i7-11700K is shown to have significantly higher power draw, with the whole-system power draw being 27% higher than a 5800X-based whole-system, when measured using Prime95 (which only adds a CPU load). In a real-world scenario such as gaming, where GPU power draw is added, this whole-system power draw percentage difference should come down. Interestingly, the i7-11700K isn't a "hot" processor, running up to 18°C cooler than a 5800X under Prime95 load. Check out this, and other invaluable early insights into "Rocket Lake" by hitting the source link below.

Dual-CCD Ryzen 5 5600X and Ryzen 7 5800X In the Wild

Certain AMD Ryzen 5 5600X and Ryzen 7 5800X processors are physically based on a dual-CCD design, according to an investigative report by Igor's Lab and Yuri "1usmus" Bubliy. The 5600X and 5800X are normally meant to be single-CCD processors owing to their core-counts. Based on the "Vermeer" multi-chip module design, the Ryzen 5000 series desktop processors use up to two 8-core CCDs to achieve their core-counts of up to 16 cores, with the 6-core 5600X and 8-core 5800X normally having just one CCD; while the 12-core 5900X and 16-core 5950X use two.

There are, apparently, some 5600X and 5800X built from dual-CCD MCMs, in which an entire CCD, although physically present on the package, is disabled. A 5600X based on a dual-CCD design is essentially a 5900X from which one of the CCDs didn't fully qualify; while the 5800X dual-CCD is a 5950X in which one such die didn't quite make the cut. There's no telling which CCD is disabled, it could be CCD 0 or CCD 1, those with CCD 0 disabled could trigger minor (benign) UI bugs with certain tuning utilities, which is how Wallossek and Bubliy discovered these chips. In any case, you're getting a 5600X or 5800X that works as advertised, and is fully covered by AMD's product warranties. Igor's Lab is investigating further into these dual-CCD 5600X and 5800X chips, and is probing the possibility of unlocking them to Ryzen 9.

Intel Core i7-11700K PassMark Score Surfaces: Trades Blows with Ryzen 7 5800X

Hot on the heels of its Geekbench score leak, we have PassMark numbers for the upcoming Core i7-11700K "Rocket Lake-S" desktop processor, leaked to the web. The PassMark online score database lists performance obtained from a single i7-11700K sample, where it's shown to be trading blows with the Ryzen 7 5800X (score averaged from over 600 samples). The Intel chip scores 3548 points single-thread rating, compared to 3509 (average) of the 5800X, while its multi-threaded score of 54255 points falls short of the 54458 points of the 5800X (average). Both these chips are 8-core/16-thread.

The Core i7-11700K has the same core configuration as the top i9-11900K part, but with lower rumored clock speeds. The Core i7 ticks at 3.60 GHz base, with up to 5.00 GHz boost, and the same 125 W TDP rating as its 10th Gen predecessor. The "Rocket Lake-S" desktop processor family sees Intel's first IPC uplift to the client-desktop platform in 5 years, on the backs of new "Cypress Cove" CPU cores. While we haven't seen evidence of core-counts above 8 for these processors, Intel's play will be to restore gaming performance leadership that it lost to AMD's Ryzen 5000 "Zen 3" processors. Plagued by scalping and limited availability to genuine customers, AMD stares at its performance leadership not translating into brand equity before Intel's next-gen parts flood the market.

The Ultimate Zen: AMD's Zen 3 Achieves 89% Higher Performance Than First-generation Zen

An investigative, generation-upon-generation review from golem.de paints an extremely impressive picture for AMD's efforts in iterating upon their original Zen architecture. While the first generation Zen achieved a sorely needed inflection point in the red team's efforts against arch-rival Intel and its stranglehold in the high-performance CPU market, AMD couldn't lose its vision on generational performance improvements on pain of being steamrolled (pun intended) by the blue giant's sheer scale and engineering prowess. However, perhaps this is one of those showcases of "small is nimble", and we're now watching Intel slowly changing its posture, crushed under its own weight, so as to offer actual competition to AMD's latest iteration of the Zen microarchitecture.

The golem.de review compares AMD's Zen, Zen+, Zen 2 and Zen 3 architectures, represented by the Ryzen 7 1800X, Ryzen 7 2700X, Ryzen 7 3800X and Ryzen 7 5800X CPUs. Through it, we see a generational performance increase that mostly exceeds the 20% performance points across every iteration of Zen when it comes to both gaming and general computing workloads. This generational improvement hits its (nowadays) most expressive result in that AMD's Ryzen 7 5800X manages to deliver 89% higher general computing, and 84% higher gaming performance than the company's Zen-based Ryzen 7 1800X. And this, of course, ignoring performance/watt improvements that turn the blue giant green with envy.

Intel Core i9-11900K "Rocket Lake" AotS Benchmark Numbers Surface

An alleged Ashes of the Singularity (AotS) benchmark results page for the top 11th Gen Core "Rocket Lake" processor leaked to the web courtesy TUM_APISAK. It's official now that Intel will keep its lengthy processor model number schemes, with the top part being the Core i9-11900K, a successor to the i9-10900K. It also confirms that the "Rocket Lake" silicon caps out at 8-core/16-thread, with performance on virtue of the IPC gains from the new "Cypress Cove" CPU cores."Cypress Cove" is believed to be a back-port of "Willow Cove" to the 14 nm silicon fabrication process that "Rocket Lake-S" is built on.

The screenshot also confirms the nominal clocks (base frequency) of the i9-11900K to be 3.50 GHz, as Intel tends to put base frequency in the name-string of its processors. Paired with a GeForce RTX 3080 and 32 GB of RAM, the i9-11900K-powered machine yielded 62.7 FPS CPU frame-rate at 1440p resolution, and 64.7 FPS CPU frame-rate at 1080p (a mere 3.18% drop in frame-rates from the increase in resolution). These numbers put the i9-11900K in the same league as the Ryzen 7 5800X in CPU frame-rates tested under similar conditions.

Corsair Unveils Vengeance A7200 Ampere+Zen3 Gaming Desktop

Corsair updated its Vengeance A-series pre-built gaming desktop line with the mighty A7200. This tower-type desktop packs next-gen hardware. At its heart is an AMD Ryzen 9 5900X "Zen 3" 12-core processor, paired with an NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 "Ampere" graphics card. Besides the 4000D case, several other bits are made by Corsair, including 32 GB (2x 16 GB) of Vengeance RGB Pro DDR4-3200 memory, 1 TB Force MP600 PCIe Gen 4 NVMe SSD, an H100i RGB Pro XT AIO CLC cooling the 5900X, and a latest-revision RM750W PSU powering it all. You can also opt for a cheaper configuration that combines a Ryzen 7 5800X 8-core processor with GeForce RTX 3070 graphics. and 16 GB of dual-channel DDR4-3200 memory.

AMD Ryzen 7 5800X, Ryzen 9 5950X CPU-Z Scores Surface

Scores for AMD's upcoming Zen 3 Ryzen 7 5800X (8 core, 16 thread) and Ryzen 9 5950X (16 core, 32 thread) have surfaced on the CPU-Z benchmark. The results, which should - as always - be taken with appropriate salt, point towards the Ryzen 7 5800X scoring 650 single-core and 6593 points in the multi-threaded benchmark. The Ryzen 9 5950X is rated as scoring 690.2 points in the same single-threaded benchmark and 13306.5 points in the multi-threaded one. CPU-Z scores for the Intel Core i9-10900K (10 cores, 20 threads) are set at 584 and 7389 points respectively. This is further fuel to the fire on AMD's current technology and performance leadership.
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