News Posts matching #Steam Link

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Steam Link Application Launched for iOS and Apple TV

Steam's Link application, which allows users to stream their games from PC to the desired device, has finally come to iOS and Apple TV. Originally, the application was expected to release on Android and iOS at the same time, but it has been available on Android devices for more than a year now and iOS support just landed. The reason behind this was rejection from Apple to include such an application in their store.

While the application finally got released for iOS and Apple TV (so you can stream games to your TV as well), it isn't the same as the Android version. Mainly, the difference is simple - no game purchases are allowed in iOS/Apple TV version. That decision came after Valve, the company behind Steam, decided to remove that feature in order to comply with Apple's App Store rules. If game purchasing was allowed then Valve would have to share a cut of the profits with Apple. So far the application has an excellent rating and users have positive opinions about it. You can find it here.

Google Announces Stadia Cloud Gaming Service at GDC 2019

We knew this was coming, especially after Google's teaser from earlier this month. Project Stream was a proof-of-concept in collaboration with Ubisoft, to see whether AAA gaming was possible over the internet. Things were smooth most of the time in our own experience, but there remained questions over how the concept would translate over to a finished product, especially with infrastructure challenges on the client side of things. Google's keynote at GDC just wrapped up, and the main focus was Stadia- the now named cloud gaming service borne out of Project Stream.

Stadia is built with instant access in mind. An example demo came in the form of Ubisoft's Assassin's Creed Odyssey, which was used in the public test before. It is integrated with partner YouTube channels such that a trailer for a supported game would have an option to play said game, which would then launch immediately. Stadia is built with support from a wide partner network including AMD, Unity, id Software, and more, with details seen past the break.

Valve Announces Steam Link App for Mobile Game Streaming Anywhere

The more things change, the more they stay the same. Valve had promised continued support to the Steam Link after discontinuing it last year, and most took it to mean basic updates to the hardware device itself at the time. That was 2018, and it is remarkable how the topic of in-house game streaming has come up since. Be it Google's Project Stream which seemingly is leading up to a major announcement by the company at GDC coming up very shortly, or Microsoft introducing their new Wireless Display app for PC game streaming on the XBOX One, as well as bringing its XBOX Live service to mobile platforms on iOS or Android alike, 2019 seems to herald a re-focus into the concept of game streaming whether the infrastructure is ready or not.

Valve for their own part has had their Steam Link be enjoyed by a fairly niche audience, one that shares a more local form of game streaming from a host device to another on the same network. NVIDIA's Shield offered a similar concept, and that too has not really made the news as much as NVIDIA would surely have wanted. This latest news from Valve allows streaming of one's Steam library (games, in particular) to phones, tablets, and TVs with no download or service fees applicable. Interested users can participate in the open beta program by simply downloading the app (Google Play store only for now) or on the Raspberry Pi as has been the case for a few months already. The Steam Link app is compatible with a number of popular Bluetooth controllers, including the Steam Controller, and Valve recommends a 5 GHz network or wired Ethernet for best experience. Looks like the weekend just got busier than I originally planned!

AMD Readies Radeon Adrenalin 2019 Edition, You Can Talk to Your Graphics Card

AMD is preparing Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition, keeping up with the tradition of big year-end software launched that are high on new features. VideoCardz got a whiff of three if its key features. One of them is Voice Control. You will soon be able to talk to your graphics card through voice-commands picked up from your microphone. Rolling out initially in English and Chinese, you will soon be able to control a lot of things while still in game and not having to take your hands off your keyboard/mouse. These include taking screenshots, telling the driver to record or stream your gameplay using ReLive, adjust display settings such as brightness, contrast, and gamma; etc. It should also take commands to change resolution, rotate displays, move workspaces between multiple displays, etc.

Enthusiasts can rejoice as WattMan could get an expanded feature-set, including one-click overclocking, similar to NVIDIA's "Turing" OC Scanner. This one-click OC feature cranks up not just your GPU's clock speeds, but also video memory. The drivers also support fully automated undervolting, which should make several current-generation Radeon graphics cards more energy-efficient. Lastly, AMD seems to be compensating for NVIDIA's VirtualLink implementation by introducing a more advanced interface - direct streaming to VR headsets. Think Steam Link for VR headsets.

Valve Says Goodbye to Steam Link But Will Continue to Offer Support

Valve seemed to have the ambition to become a hardware company when he launched peripherals like his Steam Link and its Steam Controller. The scope of these products has been limited, and now the company reports that "the supply of physical Steam Link hardware devices is sold out in Europe and almost sold out in the US". Valve has discontinued the product, although the company will continue to offer support for the Steam Link.

The idea was (and still is) really nice: any decent PC or laptop can be converted into a video game and even video content server, allowing the user to enjoy those experiences on much less powerful devices through an Ethernet or a good wireless connection. They started supporting Linux and Windows desktop and laptops, but Steam Link made it possible to stream video games to Android devices (Apple rejected the application for iOS) and Samsung Smart TVs. The product, announced in 2015, therefore says goodbye, although surely those who already have it will be able to continue enjoying it for a long time.

Apple Claims Steam Link App Violates App Store Guidelines

As most of you have heard by now, Apple revoked the release of the Steam Link app on their platform last week. Concerned customers have been sending emails to Apple to inquire about the reasons behind the decision. Phil Schiller, senior vice president of Worldwide Marketing at Apple, stated that the Steam Link application didn't comply with the App Store guidelines. Unfortunately, he didn't explain exactly how the application violated the guidelines. Nevertheless, Apple assured their customers that they will continue to work with Valve to bring the Steam experience to iOS users.

Steam Link App for iOS Rejected by Apple

Apple approved the Steam Link app for release. On Weds, May 9th, Valve released news of the app. The following morning, Apple revoked its approval citing business conflicts with app guidelines that had allegedly not been realized by the original review team. Valve appealed, explaining the Steam Link app simply functions as a LAN-based remote desktop similar to numerous remote desktop applications already available on the App Store.

Ultimately, that appeal was denied leaving the Steam Link app for iOS blocked from release. The team here spent many hours on this project and the approval process, so we're clearly disappointed. But we hope Apple will reconsider in the future.

Valve Announces the Steam Link, Steam Video Apps are Coming to Its Ecosystem

Valve today announced the upcoming release of two additional apps that will further the way users can interact with - and more importantly, game on - their Steam platform. The two apps, dubbed Steam Link and Steam video, will bring users new functionality that aims to extend their freedom to game and consume content in new ways, particularly geared for mobile, on-the-go interaction.

The Steam Link app, slated to launch on the week of May 21st, allows gamers to experience their Steam library of games on their Android (phone, tablet, TV) and iOS-based (iPhone, iPad, Apple TV) devices while connected via 5Ghz network or wired Ethernet to a host system (Mac or PC). Android access will be initially offered in beta. The Steam Link App will feature support for the Steam Controller, MFI controllers, and more across both platforms. The Steam Video app will take a little while longer to perfect, though, and should be available on the start of summer, just in time for those long hours when users just want to enjoy the thousands of movies and shows available on Steam directly via their Android and iOS devices over Wi-Fi or LTE - in both offline and streaming modes.
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