News Posts matching #VRR

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Xiaomi Launching 65-inch 120 Hz OLED TV Under "Master Series"

Xiaomi is looking to grab a piece of the premium TV market with the new Master Series. Xiaomi's new flagship TV, to be announced for the Chinese market on July 2nd, will be offering up a 65-inch OLED panel with a snappy 120 Hz refresh rate, which means it will be able to take full advantage of next-generation consoles' "up to" 120 Hz FPS delivery. Besides the OLED chops, there's Dolby Certification for both Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos.

Other specs include HDMI 2.1, VRR support, and ALLM (Automatic Low Latency Mode). A quad-core Arm Cortex-A73 custom chip will be powering the TV's graphical and OS processing. Apparently there will be some sort of RGB lighting on the TV's frame, and a metallic remote control with NFC support aims to increase the premium feeling. Xiaomi's CEO Lei Jun described it as "Xiaomi's ultra-high-end OLED TV" and "very amazing." Well. We'll have to see now won't we. If it's actual competition to today's premium mainstream LG C9 and Samsung Q90R TVs, it's bound to sell like hotcakes.

Xiaomi Launches Mi Display 165 Hz Version Monitor: 27" IPS, 1440p, 165 Hz, VRR, Display HDR400

Xiaomi today soft-launched a new, high-refresh rate IPS gaming monitor on their Mi line. The Xiaomi Mi Display 165 Hz brings a 27", 8-bit IPS panel with a 2560 x 1440 resolution and a pretty impressive 95% DCI-P3 color space coverage. Response time is quoted at 4 ms (1 ms GtG, as most manufacturers insist on quoting their response time speeds). There is support for VRR technologies (AMD's FreeSync and NVIDIA's G-Sync Compatible), as well as Display HDR 400 certification (the lowest that can be had, but still, it's certified). Peak luminance in HDR is set at 400 nits, with typical brilliance standing at 320 nits.

I/O-wise, we're looking at 3x USB 3.0, 1x HDMI, 1x DisplayPort and 1x 3.5 mm headset port. The reported specifications, including the DCI-P3 color space coverage, should make this monitor interesting for users ranging from gamers to amateur/semi-professional photo and video editors. pricing, however, is the icing in the cake: Xiaomi will be selling this monitor for 2,199 yuan (which amounts to roughly $299) - a bargain when one considers the overall specifications on this monitor. The monitor will be available from June 17 in China, with international availability following.

Acer Announces New XV272XU Monitor: 27" 1440p AHVA, 165 Hz, 1 ms, Vesa HDR400, VRR Support

Acer today introduced their new XV272XU monitor. A wildly popular, sweet-spot-like 27" 1440p panel is used with what Acer says is an "IPS-like" panel from AUO Optronics' of the AHVA type. The 165 Hz refresh rate and 1 ms (GtG) response time alongside VRR support from both AMD (FreeSync) and NVIDIA (G-Sync) up the ante in terms of gaming fluency. The 178º/178º viewing angles and 8-bit panel ensure proper accuracy for its 99% coverage of the Adobe RGB color gamut, while the 1000:1 contrast ratio and VESA HDR400 certification round out the specifications.

There are swivel (+- 20º), pivot (+- 90º) and tilt (-5º to 25º) functions to increase adaptability to any workplace scenario, alongside height adjustment (in a 120 mm range). A VESA 100 x 100 mm mount is present, as are 2x 2 W speakers. I/= is taken care of by 4x USB 3.0 Type A, 1x USB Type-C, 2x HDMI 2.0, 1x DisplayPort 1.2, and 1x 3.5 mm audio jack. The Acer XV272XU is expected to be released between Q3-Q4 2020 for a price of 5,499 CNY ($770 / €707 / £632).

EVE Distribution Announces the Spectrum Crowd-Sourced Monitor Lineup - Up to 4K 120 Hz IPS and FreeSync Premium

EVE Distribution, the company that's already crowd-sourced the Microsoft Surface-rival Eve Hybrid, which launched to very positive feedback from the tech community (even with the incredible delays in shipping and distributing the purchased Eve Hybrids, though the company now says they've rebuilt their logistics and distribution mechanisms. Now, the company is eyeing next-generation gaming with its Spectrum monitor lineup, which aim to be both PC-centric and console-centric gaming monitors.

The three monitor models all share LG as a panel source (specifically, the same panel used in the LG UltraGear 27GL850. All of them also share the same IPS technology with 1 ms response times, 98% DCI-P3 and 100% sRGB coverage, as well as the same 1,000:1 contrast ratio. Freesync Premium (from 48 Hz VRR support through to the maximum refresh rate of every monitor) and G-Sync Compatible support is standard on all monitors. Differences start to appear when looking at maximum resolution, brightness and refresh rates.

AOC Releases Five New Gaming Monitors - All Sporting 1080p Panels, FreeSync Premium

Display specialist AOC announces the launch of five new Full HD monitors: three curved (C27G2ZU, C27G2ZE and C32G2ZE) and two flat models (24G2ZU, 24G2ZE) that competitive gamers have been longing for.

The new monitors range from 23.8" (60.4 cm) and 27" (68.6 cm) up to 31.5" (80 cm) and offer breathtaking specifications: a 240 Hz refresh rate and just 0.5 ms (1 ms for the 31.5" version) MPRT create an incredibly "connected" feel to the game world. All models additionally come equipped with FreeSync Premium with LFC (Low Framerate Compensation) support, providing smooth game visuals without tearing or stuttering.

LG Announces the UltraGear 27GN750 Monitor: 27" 1080p IPS, 240 Hz, 1 ms, VRR Support

LG today introduced their UltraGear 27GN750 monitor, which aims to bring high-speed, fluid gaming to a relatively low price-point. The 27GN750 is a flat monitor with a 27" diagonal, featuring an IPS panel and 1080p resolution. The gaming chops on this monitor are very much increased by the fact that it features a 240 Hz refresh rate with 1 ms response time. LG also touts VRR support in the form of G-SYNC Compatible certification (which means it employs VRR much like AMD first did through VRR instead of having to employ a dedicated module).

LG says this display is HDR compatible, but make no mistake, it's the lowest form supported (400 nits typical brightness with 320 nits as minimum according to LG), so that compatibility is... Arguable, to say the least. There's no VESA HDR 400 badge for a reason. Color reproduction is rated at 99% sRGB coverage (typical for an IPS panel). Connectivity-wise, we're looking at 1x DisplayPort, 2x HDMI, 1x USB 3.0 (upstream), 2x USB 3.0 (downstream) and 1x Headphone. LG quotes a Tilt / Height / Pivot Adjustable Stand. The LG UltraGear 27GN750 monitor is available for $399.

AOC Announces the AGON AG493UCX Monitor: 49" VA, 5120 x 1440, 120 Hz, 1ms, 32:9, FreeSync and DisplayHDR 400

AOC has announced a new addition to their AGON line of gaming monitors in the form of the AGON AG493UCX. This is a beastly monitor with a 49" diagonal and 4K resolution with a Super Ultra-Wide aspect ratio of 32:9 (with a resolution of 5120 x 1440 pixels). The panel type is VA, which promises increased contrast ratios against those typically found in IPS panels (3000:1, in this case). AOC is promising 120 Hz refresh rates with a 1 ms (MPRT) response times with MBR backlight. There is also support for VRR technologies such as FreeSync and G-Sync (compatible).

Display brightness is quoted at 550 cd/m², which is just shy of a DisplayHDR 600 certification, but comfortably achieves the VESA DisplayHDR 400 certification. The monitor isn't a slouch in terms of color display either, being better than your average VA panel: the display is factory-calibrated and ships with a guaranteed dE <2, and coverage for 16.7 millions colors across a 93% DCI-P3 gamut coverage (and 121% sRGB coverage). I/O is handled by 2x DisplayPort 1.4, 2x HDMI 2.0, 1x USB type-C, 3x USB ports and 1x an audio output. 2x 5 W speakers are built in to the screen and the stand offers tilt, height and swivel adjustments. No word on pricing as of yet.

NVIDIA to Open G-Sync Monitors to VRR Support, Enabling AMD Graphics Cards Support

In the wars of variable refresh rates, much ink has already been spilled regarding the open, AMD FreeSync approach and NVIDIA's proprietary G-Sync modules. The war started to give its first signs of abatement once NVIDIA seemed to throw in the towel by officially supporting VESA's VRR (Variable Refresh Rate) technology on its graphics cards, basically opening the way for NVIDIA graphics cards to correctly operate with previously AMD FreeSync-branded monitors. Now, it seems one more step will be taken on that road which should be G-Sync's proprietary approach final whiff, since according to a report from TFT Central, confirmed by NVIDIA, the company will enable VRR support for next releases of monitors equipped with the company's G-Sync module. This will essentially enable AMD graphics cards to work with NVIDIA-branded G-Sync monitors.

Acer Announces Nitro XV3 Line of PC Gaming Monitors

Acer unveiled a new series of Nitro gaming monitors, designed to bring games to life. The new Acer Nitro XV3 series features four new monitors for gamers that deliver extremely high refresh rates and high resolution, providing outstanding casual gameplay at affordable prices.

NVIDIA G-SYNC compatible, the new Nitro monitors enable Variable Refresh Rates (VRR) by default when connected to NVIDIA GeForce GTX 10-Series and GeForce RTX 20-Series graphics cards to support dynamic refresh rates, eliminating screen tearing and minimizing lag. These new IPS[1] monitors also feature Adaptive-Sync technology to satisfy gamers' need for high resolution gaming through a blisteringly fast response time of up to 1 ms and Visual Response Boost (VRB) for smooth, tear-free gameplay.

Microsoft Extends Variable Refresh Rate to Games that Lack Native Support

Microsoft extended variable refresh-rate (VRR) to games that don't natively support it, through a new global setting under Graphics Settings. To access this setting, you must have the latest Windows 10 May 2019 Update (version 1903), a display that supports NVIDIA G-Sync, AMD FreeSync, or VESA Adaptive-Sync, and a graphics processor with a WDDM 2.6-compliant driver that supports these VRR technologies. For now, this setting only works with DirectX 11 games in exclusive-fullscreen mode. Microsoft clarified that this setting is not designed to override the VRR options presented by the control panels of your display driver provider (eg: NVIDIA Control Panel or AMD Radeon Settings). The option is disabled by default, and isn't visible to users who don't meet both the hardware- and software-requirements of VRR.

HP Omen X Emperium 65 is the FIRST NVIDIA BFGD Product: 4K, HDR, G-SYNC, 144 Hz for $4,999

Product context: HP showcased their new and upcoming Omen X Emperium 65 at CES, an NVIDIA BFGD (Big Format Gaming Display) with all the features the company deems premium and attractive to gamers: 4K resolution, a huge, 65" diagonal AMVA panel, HDR (1,000 nits of peak luminance and 95 percent of the DCI-P3 color gamut) , G-Sync, and 120 - 144Hz refresh rate (144 Hz is overclocked) with a gray-to-gray response time is rated for 4ms. It features an incorporated sound bar with 120 W of power and three amps. An integrated NVIDIA Shield makes an appearance as well as a multimedia juggernaut solution. All of this in a $4,999 body, launching in February 2019.

Thoughts: Rollback. A $4,999 price-tag. Maybe this is just me, but NVIDIA seems to be finally introducing their BFGDs at the worst possible time, considering the company has just formally announced that their GeForce graphics cards would be finally supporting VESA's VRR (Variable Refresh Rate) standard. This brings with it FreeSync support - for monitors and, we'd expect, TV's as well, considering that the driver solution will be toggable by users even in a non-NVIDIA certified display.

Upcoming XBOX "Project Scorpio" to Support Freesync 2, HDMI 2.1 VRR

In what could spell very interesting things for the uptake of the Freesync 2 open-standard, Digital Foundry has confirmed that Microsoft's upcoming "Project Scorpio" console will leverage AMD's FreeSync 2 standard so as to improve fluidity of frames. The objective is, as usual, to eliminate tearing and reduce stutter, allowing the GPU to trigger the display refresh rate at exactly the same frequency as it can churn out frames. The FreeSync 2 revision of the open standard is HDR-compatible, which means it supports what is being touted as The Next Big Thing in image quality. Like always, the available FreeSync-supported band will still depend on the panel's actual specifications. Additionally, the Scorpio is going to offer support for the upcoming VRR (Variable Refresh Rate) implemented within the HDMI 2.1 specifications.

Though TV panels don't support either of those standards currently, AMD has teased that FreeSync support on TVs would be possible - and upcoming. If true, and if this FreeSync support were to take off, this might spell an increased uptake on AMD's open standard implementation of VRR over NVIDIA's G-SYNC. The adoption of these VRR technologies would also allow developers to perhaps change their performance targets (say, from 60 FPS to 45 FPS), while also increasing fluidity of games that struggle to maintain their target frame rate. The Scorpio could be the first mainstream piece of tech to offer widespread support for VRR standards, thus increasing the user base and industry adoption rate of this technologies, which can only be good. To say that this adoption spells the death of NVIDIA's proprietary G-SYNC is nothing more than wild, boastful speculation; saying it could drive FreeSync and HDMI's VRR implementation towards mainstream usage is not. And that could mean a slow push of G-SYNC towards a niche PC-monitor solution with reduced uptake from monitor manufacturers.
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