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Micron Introduces a New Way to Increase Server Memory Capacity, Improve Performance

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Jul 30, 2009.

  1. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Micron Technology, Inc. today announced that it has produced the industry's first DDR3 load-reduced, dual-inline memory module (LRDIMM) and will begin sampling 16-gigabyte (GB) versions this fall. By reducing load on the server memory bus, Micron's LRDIMMs provide the option to support higher data frequencies and significantly increase memory capacity.

    The new LRDIMMs will be manufactured using Micron's leading-edge 1.35-volt, 2-gigabit (Gb) 50-nanometer DDR3 memory chips, allowing the company to easily and cost-effectively increase server module capacity because of the chips' high-density and industry-leading small die size. Micron's 2Gb 50nm DDR3 product is currently in qualification with customers and is ramping toward high volume production.

    [​IMG]

    Most midrange enterprise servers today utilize approximately 32 GB of DRAM per system but this is expected to more than triple by 2012, according to a recent report from Gartner, Inc. (May 2009). With server manufacturers continuing to take advantage of multi-core processors and data centers opting for efficient virtualization technology, memory requirements are being driven ever higher. By increasing the available memory a server system has, it is able to run more programs concurrently, handle larger data files more efficiently, and generally exhibit better overall system performance.

    Micron's LRDIMMs currently use Inphi's recently announced isolation memory buffer (iMB) chip in place of a register to reduce the bus load when transferring data between the memory and processor. Micron's new LRDIMMs reduce this load by 50 percent for a dual-rank module and 75 percent for a quad-rank module, when compared to today's standard DDR3 server modules - registered DIMMs (RDIMMs). By reducing the load on the bus, Micron's LRDIMMs enable servers to handle higher frequencies of data to improve overall system performance and support increased number of modules for greater system memory capacity.

    Today, using RDIMMs, a typical server system can accommodate up to three quad-rank 16GB RDIMMS per processor. However, that same system can support up to nine quad-rank 16GB LRDIMMS per processor, pushing the memory capacity from 48GB to 144GB. Measuring performance levels, Micron's 16GB LRDIMM offers an increase of 57 percent in system memory bandwidth, when compared to an RDIMM. And as server power consumption continues to be a top concern for customers, Micron's LRDIMMs will also operate at the industry's lowest 1.35-volts.

    "With the rise in virtualization, our new 16GB modules allow customers to easily expand their memory capacity. While traditional RDIMMs limit the amount of memory that can be accommodated due to their loading profile, LRDIMMs eliminate that problem by reducing the module load," said Robert Feurle, vice president of DRAM marketing at Micron. "And because our LRDIMMs are designed using Micron's new low-power 2Gb-based 50nm DDR3 chips, which reduces module chip count, we are providing customers with a more cost-effective and efficient means to scale server memory capacity and performance, while also reducing the power levels."

    "Adoption of this approach to memory technology will further enable server virtualization and cloud computing," said Paul Washkewicz, vice president of marketing at Inphi. "This technology delivers the much needed higher bandwidth and memory capacity demanded by data center servers."

    "As the leading supplier of low power memory interface devices such as AMB+ and DDR3 register/PLLs, IDT is excited to once again leverage our industry-proven technology and expertise into this new class of memory buffers targeting DDR3 LRDIMMs," says Mario Montana, vice president and general manager of the IDT Enterprise Computing Division. "We are pleased to work with Micron and our ecosystem partners to enable innovative solutions for the high performance computing market."

    Product Availability
    Micron is currently sampling an 8GB LRDIMM with select enablers. Mass production of its 16GB LRDIMMs is expected to begin in 2010.
    1c3d0g says thanks.
  2. h3llb3nd4

    h3llb3nd4 New Member

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    16GBs:eek:
    but I fear of the price
  3. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    It's not for you, you don't have to fear.
  4. h3llb3nd4

    h3llb3nd4 New Member

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    heh, true but I really want to use one:rolleyes:
  5. Easo

    Easo

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    Woot, progress in front of our eyes!
  6. Bjorn_Of_Iceland

    Bjorn_Of_Iceland

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    Looks hot (literally)
  7. Woody112

    Woody112 New Member

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    16GB is just sick, then again in 5-10 years, that will be the norm for a desk top PC.
  8. buggalugs

    buggalugs

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    Can i poont noobs with this?
  9. Meecrob New Member

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    so how long till they figuar out that something like this for the desktop market would sell to :p
  10. Static~Charge

    Static~Charge

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    One question: Can you use LRDIMMs in an existing machine that takes registered DIMMs without needing a hardware or BIOS change?
  11. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    They said they're sampling an 8GB LRDIMM with select enablers, which gives the impression that it can't be used on existing machines without any changes.
  12. BazookaJoe

    BazookaJoe

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    First of all : Loving the Tiger btarunr...

    Second : Mod this shiz for ddr2 - and I'll take 4 for when I move over to Win7x64 ... 64gb... drool...

    Edit : YES YES forum trolls - I KNOW my Mobo wont actually be able to ADDRESS 64gb.. jeez.. a guy can dream cant he? :)
    Crunching for Team TPU
  13. hat

    hat Maximum Overclocker

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    I was wondering when something like this would happen, what with huge memory sticks...

    So, how long until the 16 exabyte ceiling of 64-bit is reached? According to Wikipedia, 64-bit processors were used in supercomputers as early as the 1960s, but the industry went with 32-bit. 32-bit started becoming limited in the 90's when 4GB was simply not enough for some scenarios. Using this information, I estimate that 32-bit lasted for roughly 30 years. Given the ever-increacing speed technology evolves... I'd give 64-bit 10 years.
    Crunching for Team TPU
  14. crazy pyro

    crazy pyro New Member

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    So we'll move onto 128 bit as 64 bit finally becomes standard then?
  15. Meecrob New Member

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    anybody else here just wish they would bring out quantum processors and be done with it :p
  16. BazookaJoe

    BazookaJoe

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    Hells' Yeah :p
    Crunching for Team TPU
  17. Assimilator

    Assimilator

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    Hopefully LRDIMMs will become the new standard for server memory. High capacities, better performance, lower power consumption... even if they come in at double the price for a same-capacity module as compared to standard DDR3 RDIMMs, a lot of people will be queueing up to buy these chips.
  18. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    In 2019, you'll be ideally buying 64 GB or 128 GB of memory for your PC.
  19. Woody112

    Woody112 New Member

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    I'd buy one:D
  20. BazookaJoe

    BazookaJoe

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    Lets hope we have 128/256bit bus to go with that by then :)
    Crunching for Team TPU
  21. t77snapshot

    t77snapshot

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    :eek: 16-gigabyte :rockout:
    Crunching for Team TPU
  22. EarlZ New Member

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    Nice! I need 6 of these, I hope they make a desktop version of this module soon......
  23. crazy pyro

    crazy pyro New Member

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    They won't be affordable for bleedin' ages though, it costs a fortune for a 4GB stick of RAM as it is, don't want to imagine the price of 16GB.
  24. 1c3d0g

    1c3d0g

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    Micron ROCKS! Go Micron Go! :rockout:

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