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My OpenBSD experience:

Discussion in 'Linux / BSD / Mac OS X' started by regexorcist, Mar 25, 2010.

  1. Easy Rhino

    Easy Rhino Linux Advocate

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    yea i was just curious. i run a few freebsd virtual machines on vmware server 2.0 and it really works well. i would like to have it host virtual machines to do some specific things like hosting low security programs like team speak.
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2010
  2. beowuff

    beowuff New Member

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    So, basically, the OpenBSD argument against virtualization is two fold.
    1) Your placing a fully functioning OS on top of another one. Now you have the security issues and vulnerabilities of both OSs.
    2) You also have the security issues with the virtualization software. Not only with the software itself, but also possible issues between the two OSs.

    Like I said, I've used VMs before, but always on workstations to play around with things. I'm not sure I'd use them in a production environment. Jails and chroots, however, are different animals that I'm just starting to really play with. :)
  3. Easy Rhino

    Easy Rhino Linux Advocate

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    VMs work differently however. i can install a security problem piece of software like teamspeak on a linux virtual machine and i do not have to worry about somebody hacking it because they wont get anything of value. all of the important root and OS stuff is running on the host and it is impossible to get from the VM to the host. that is really a great reason to run virtual machines.
  4. beowuff

    beowuff New Member

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    But if they hack your VM, they've still got a VM running on a machine that they can use. So, they can still get something of value. Having the VM means you now have two OSs to secure. There's still value in having a hacked machine, even if it's just used as a zombie.

    You can't know this for sure. There could be a bug in the VM software that would allow access to the host. If you hack a VM, it's pretty easy to be able to tell your in a VM. At that point, you can start on the VM software. Or try to hack the host directly.

    I'm not saying there's no use for VMs. Obviously they can be immensely useful or the software wouldn't be as popular as they are today. I even use them occasionally. :)
  5. Easy Rhino

    Easy Rhino Linux Advocate

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    so long as you are a good admin and you constantly monitor your machines it is highly unlikely. you just shut down the VM without having to shutdown the entire PC.


    thus far no bugs have been found allowing access from the VM to the host. in fact, the only way in theory is if you can somehow determine the virtual cpu clock cycles and match it with the host cpu clock cycles at the right time. and i really dont think that is going to happen anytime soon.
  6. regexorcist

    regexorcist New Member

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    Decided to try something different...

    Prior to installing openBSD on my main desktop,
    I installed it on a spare computer that was given to me,
    so last night I pulled that same spare computer out
    (Dell Dimension 2300) and installed DragonflyBSD.

    There were a few issues w/ partitioning and then
    a reoccurring failed temp sensor reading which
    kept displaying on the command line, but I did get
    it installed successfully. :)
    I used the package manager to download
    the 5 or 6 xorg meta packages as well as a window manager
    and a few other apps. I really liked pkg_radd as opposed
    to pkg_add which saved me some time (didn't have to look up a mirror).
    I selected the "Hammer" file system which, from what I read, offers some
    neat features, but I didn't spend to much time reading the details. :eek:

    All in all, I prefer openBSD which has been running 24/7 as my primary
    desktop and file server for at least 3 weeks now. Operation has been flawless
    and there were no installation issues. I'm probably going to add a second
    network card to that spare computer and replace DragonflyBSD with openBSD.
    Then (when I get more time) experiment with router and firewall configurations.

    To be fair, now that DragonflyBSD is installed it seems solid, but I'm not
    going to leave it on long enough to really evaluate. I know what I like and
    it's openBSD :D

    The story continues...
  7. Easy Rhino

    Easy Rhino Linux Advocate

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    i just realized... NO SCREENSHOTS!!! where are they at?!?!?!?
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  8. regexorcist

    regexorcist New Member

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    Your absolutely right...
    I'll post screenshots from now on

    Here is my current desktop...

    [​IMG]
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  9. Easy Rhino

    Easy Rhino Linux Advocate

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    did you find the openbox docs helpful? i am currently working on openbox on ubuntu and would like to know how to find current video resolution and what not.
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  10. regexorcist

    regexorcist New Member

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    I didn't read the docs. :ohwell:

    I don't use any Openbox utilities like obmenu, I find it much easier to edit my menu.xml file
    and as for display resolutions/options, If I don't like the initial resolution I'll edit my xorg.conf file.
    (NOTE: I usually stick with one resolution, so there is no need to change on the fly)

    Lately systems have gotten better at detecting hardware so an xorg.conf may not exist,
    but it's a simple matter to generate one.

    I usually prefer to manually edit config files over using any GUI front end, but thats' just me... ;)
  11. Bink New Member

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    Congrats on thinking/playing outside of the Linux box. I’ve been using OpenBSD for many years now—and, pretty much, replaced Debian with it. Regarding window managers, if you are open to something minimal, you might want to try the built-in cwm. It’s quite decent, lightweight and, well, built-in. While I would not consider OpenBSD a desktop-oriented OS—I use it mainly for routing, firewall and related functions, which it excels at—it’s very clean, consistent and will still make for a decent desktop (I hope you don’t care for anything Adobe Flash… ;) ).

    Cheers.
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2010
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  12. regexorcist

    regexorcist New Member

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    Hi Bink,
    Thanks for the post.

    I may try cwm, but...
    Is this project active, has there been any development since 2005??

    As for Flash, swfdec works OK for the older stuff and the long awaited
    Demise of Flash :) is just around the corner!! :roll:
  13. Bink New Member

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    cwm is now part of OpenBSD’s base—so while the original project might have been abandoned, the OpenBSD devs have become its new in-tree stewards and have been updating/fixing bugs the code regularly ever since its import in 4.2. As for Flash, yes, I too look forward to its demise…
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2010
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  14. regexorcist

    regexorcist New Member

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    Now I remember...
    It was in the fvwm menu as an option initially.

    I'll try cwm along with a bunch of other window managers
    when I upgrade to 4.7 (just a few weeks away) :D

    So Bink,
    What do you use for your desktop OS :confused:
  15. Bink New Member

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    I hate to say it in this forum, and it’s a bit OT, but I primarily run Windows 7—as my day job keeps me quite involved, primarily, with Windows. Then again, while it is proprietary/near monopoly/closed software, Windows 7 has proven pretty damn decent—and it still does power management better than any UNIX-like OS I’ve ever used (perhaps with the exception of OS X, but I find Apple, in many ways, to be worse than Microsoft).

    While I look forward to the day I can run open source, particularly OpenBSD, on almost everything, it’s not a religion for me and closed source still has its place—and is still better than open source at quite a few things.
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  16. regexorcist

    regexorcist New Member

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    Just as open source is better at quite a few things also. ;)

    As for that day...
    For some of us, it's already here and for others it may never come.

    Thanks for posting on my OpenBSD thread!! :toast:
    Bink says thanks.
  17. regexorcist

    regexorcist New Member

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    As of last night...
    I had to take a detour off the OpenBSD road due to hardware compatibility.

    Just received my new ATI 1 gig. video card w/ HDMI connector.
    To get any 3D capabilities and HDMI sound, I have to use the
    ATI Catalyst Driver for Linux. Even so, configuring sound was still
    a bit of a chore.
    Now I use a 32" LCD TV for a monitor, so it makes sense to use
    the video card and Catalyst driver even if I have to transfer back
    to a Linux distro.
    My choice was between Arch and Slackware...
    While Arch is a fairly clean slate to develop on, I prefer that
    Slackware's philosophy was to produce the most "Unix like" OS
    and as J.R. "Bob" Dobbs reminded me... I must have slack!! ;)

    As for OpenBSD...
    I'll be back!!! when hardware permits.

    For now I'll put it on a laptop or secondary system :ohwell:
  18. Easy Rhino

    Easy Rhino Linux Advocate

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    i know what you mean. my graphics requirements kept me from sticking with freebsd even though i have an nvidia card.

    slackware is a good choice but i simply could not get used to it. plus the community acted highly elite and would not answer questions unless you phrased them in a specific way. now, i was used to that since i played around with freebsd for several years, but these guys were just lame.

    you could always go with something like gentoo or centos. both have strong communities and are very clean. gentoo actually uses the portage system :D
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  19. regexorcist

    regexorcist New Member

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    yes I had Gentoo before and found it to be a PITA :D

    Actually, I considered BSD because I was familiar w/ Portage
    so it was Gentoo that got me to BSD indirectly.

    I say it was a PITA because at the time, I was trying many different
    development systems so I would emerge/compile for like
    45 minutes, try it out, not like it, uninstall and try another one, repeat, repeat...

    I would sometimes get a note at the end to manually change some config file
    or change my make config to ignore some library version, etc...

    All in all, I preferred Arch to Gentoo.

    As for a specific "distro" community, I don't bother,
    they are always wayyy toooo seriousss!!
    General Nonsense is more my speed :D

    NOTE:
    I'm not putting Gentoo down, I learned more about Linux
    from Gentoo than any other distro, period!!
  20. Easy Rhino

    Easy Rhino Linux Advocate

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    i hear yea. the ubuntu community has been very helpful and i find them patient enough. same with the fedora community but they are not clean enough if you want to develop and start from a clean slate.

    when you get arch up and running you should create another thread and take some screen shots :toast:
  21. regexorcist

    regexorcist New Member

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    A good community is important for a distro to grow and Ubuntu is
    probably the largest community. I used to listen to LUG Radio
    and now A Shot of Jaq oggcasts w/ Jono Bacon (Ubuntu Community Manager).

    Arch is a very good system,
    at one time I was running Arch w/ JWM and just a few xfce and obscure apps.
    I couldn't have been any lighter and made it a point to not
    install any gnome/kde libraries, a few were required for different things
    but not too many.
    I liked pacman and yaourt but a rolling release isn't for me, I would
    update the system every few weeks and worry if something broke.
    It never did, but that didn't stop me from worrying.
    I like fixed stable releases, not bleeding edge or high maintenance,
    I liked OpenBSD, but I also like to get as much out of my PC
    hardware as I can. It's slackware for now and I'll upgrade from
    this release candidate (13.1 RC2) to 13.1 release when it comes out.

    Now it's time to play with some things that were not available to me on BSD. :pimp:

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