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TPU Peripherals Club

Discussion in 'techPowerUp! Club Forum' started by Binge, Jul 6, 2009.

  1. kyle2020 Guest

    is my list ok then? :confused:
  2. Fitseries3

    Fitseries3 Eleet Hardware Junkie

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    what? you added that text... ;) :p
  3. Binge

    Binge Overclocking Surrealism

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    It's fine I just want to make a point that I read each person's post and you'll notice next to your name as a member there are only the peripherals listed. Mouspads are not connected via cable or virtual cable to a computer I/O, and neither are processors.
  4. MRCL

    MRCL

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    What about illimunated mousepads, they're USB-powered :p
  5. Binge

    Binge Overclocking Surrealism

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    But they send no signals to the CPU in any way shape or form :( Maybe if your mouspad updates it's onboard clock and weather report on an OLED screen then I would totally add it :D
  6. MRCL

    MRCL

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    An OLED screen mouspad... now there a (ratehr senseless) idea :laugh:
  7. erocker

    erocker Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Look for it soon. I wish OLED's would just finally take off one of these days, they are awesome looking. I have no doubt we will be seeing OLED's in everything including mice, mousepads, keyboards, etc..
  8. human_error

    human_error

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    I've put up a guide to people wanting to add a remote to their media center pc here:

    http://forums.techpowerup.com/showthread.php?p=1464168#post1464168

    It's my first guide so i'll probably need to re-write some parts to read better over the next couple of days - especially since all i know is what i learned over the past few days from various sources when looking for a IR receiver that would work with a logitech harmony remote.

    Feel free to link/post any feedback on the guide there as trying to find the info on what usb receivers will work properly is a nightmare and i hope putting all the info in one place will help people in the same situation.
  9. Thrackan

    Thrackan

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    Man, I forgot mentioning my XFX vibrating headset!
  10. human_error

    human_error

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    Gah i forgot to add i have an OCZ NIA (used it as part of my final year uni degree dissertation last month, my game worked great but the NIA did not want to co-operate in my demonstration :( )
  11. Thrackan

    Thrackan

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    I sold my NIA, didn't use it anymore.

    Oh and the Aurora just came in! What a SWEEEEEEEET keyboard!
  12. Binge

    Binge Overclocking Surrealism

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    ABS M1 Mechanical Keyboard

    Overview & Features: The ABS M1 is a standard IBM layout 104 key USB keyboard with simplified black Alps mechanical key switches. Mechanical key
    switch keyboards boast longer life and a more satisfying keystroke. This keyboard is all black with white lettering. There is nothing too fancy about the layout,
    but it is a Mechanical USB keyboard for well under the standard average price point of $100 USD. The ABS M1 can be bought from a number of well known
    retailers. I purchased mine from Newegg.com for $30 (free shipping).

    First Impressions: This keyboard came in a standard keyboard box colored royal blue and black with white text. On the face of the box is a photo of the
    keyboard, and a diagram of a black Alps mechanical switch in white to match the text. It's sort of easy to see ABS is really selling the mechanical switches with
    the size of the diagram. I grabbed a few pictures from inaneframe's ABS M1 review @ geekhack.org, and I will replace some of them with my own once I get a
    new camera. For now I'll use these as a visual reference. Packaging was simple. There was a foam wraping around the keyboard and the USB cord was left
    separated visually by a cardboard divider.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    This 2nd picture is actually the back of the box, but it still carries the asthetics of blue on black with white text.

    A good look at the... goods:

    [​IMG]

    The keys and chassis share the same black matte finish, but the chassis has a very distinct coarse texture. The chassis texture not something I see too often from
    keyboard manufacturers. I noticed on the box there was a braided cable mentioned and gold plated USB connector. The cord being a cloth braid is probably the
    nicest touch to the keyboard. To the eye this is a subtle and satisfying quality, it's beautiful.

    Benching: Honestly I was very excited to try out this keyboard. My close friend owns a Das III Professional keyboard, and I honestly felt a supreme jealousy
    after a bit of typing. The feel of a good mechanical switch is first determined by the tension the key first exerts while your finger rests on top. After a weight is applied
    to the key it travels toward the bottom of the key switch. In the course of key travel there are switches that will "knock" and that tactile response means that you've
    registered a key stroke. The registering distance will change depending on the switch, but most register a stroke at half distance to bottom. If you're heavy handed a
    "heavier" key is preffered, and one would assume people who appreciate light touch would appreciate the light keys. The weight of a key as well as the feedback in
    tactility is determined by the type of mechanical switch used in each key.

    [​IMG]

    The consumer description of the Alps black switches (coded black by the color of the center piece of the key switch) are non-clicky with tactile feedback. My first
    observation while using the ABS M1 was that the keyboard had heavy keys. My fingers can fully rest on the keyboard without the keys giving into travel. The second
    observation is that the key switches are very tactile. I can sense when the key stroke has registered without much thought, and I notice myself feeling for this sensation
    while typing. I type by muscle memory and not visual memory so this does help. The keys did not make a sound durring key travel to the point of registering, but it
    made a LOUD thock sound as the key bottomed out. It's a decently crisp sound, so I'm really not bothered by it. In fact the sound of typing is pretty soothing to me.
    The sound made by the ABS M1 is not made by the switch, but it is caused by the way the switches have been mounted to the backplate. A key that is considered
    clicky would have a mechanism in the key that creates an audible noise in order to signal a keystroke along with the tactile sensation most mechanical switches offer.
    Black Alps switches do not have such a mechanism.

    The ABS M1 mechanical keyboard is definitely solid feeling. A combination of overall weight with durable grippy rubber feet kept the board from moving around on just
    about any surface I tested (wood, aluminum, glass, and plastic). The ABS M1 cured an annoyance I had when I would type with my previous keyboard. With the Saitek
    Eclipse II I would make a keystroke it would slightly rock my table, causing my mouse to move if I took my hands off of it. This was probably because I thought I had to
    use a lot more effort to register a keystroke. There was no sensation when the keyboard would register a key and only the character appearing on the screen would tell me
    that I could move to the next. In that time I had already bottomed out the key with the full weight of my finger. Using an ABS M1 as a daily typer is something I will enjoy.

    Final Thoughts: If anyone wishes their keyboard had a little more tension in the keys, but would allow for less overall force to type should look into the ABS M1
    mechanical keyboard. It's average footprint and standard keyboard layout is a quality I look for rather than excessive buttons or strange ergonomic shapes. The practicality
    of this particular keyboard is easily put into a catagory of excellence because of the layout and quality of the black Alps keyswitches.

    BiNGE recommends this to typists and enthusiasts alike! 8/10

    I'm only giving this keyboard an 8/10 because of it's lack of consistant rollover. Rollover is best understood by how many keys can be simultaniously pressed and still end up
    registered by the PC. I wrote the following on Geekhack.org in response to a thread about the ABS M1 and rollover.

    Last edited: Jul 12, 2009
    Cold Storm says thanks.
  13. Thrackan

    Thrackan

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    Binge: I noticed on the Filco website that USB isn't really fit for full rollover, that might be the issue with the ABS?
    PS/2 > USB in that case...
  14. Binge

    Binge Overclocking Surrealism

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    It's that way with all keyboards. USB has driver issues when forced to recognize simultanious key strokes. USB -> PS/2 converters don't work at all to improve rollover with this KB, so that means the ABS M1 does not use diodes but does use blockers in the firmware to prevent ghosting.
  15. Binge

    Binge Overclocking Surrealism

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    Filco FKBN87M/EB Tenkeyless & Das Keyboard III

    Overview & Features: These two keyboards boast Cherry corperation MX key switches which are high quality and promise a long life
    for your keyboard. Each board uses a different kind of Cherry MX switch. The Filco uses a Cherry MX Brown key switch which is
    tactile but non-clicky, and the Das has the peppy Cherry MX blue switches which are tactile and clicky.

    The Filco Tenkeyless is a 87 key reduced footprint keyboard, so it lacks the keys that would normally be the number pad for right
    handed typers. Being a space saver does not mean that this keyboard is to be taken lightly- it weighs a little more than 7 lbs
    or 3.2 kg. The finish of the keyboard is a smooth matte black and the key symbols are applied by a silk screen process.
    Filco would not formally comment as to how they applied the key symbols, but it's obvious how the ink was applied. Aside from
    the asthetics the Filco is a USB|PS/2 keyboard. While the USB is easier to use with a notebook computer the PS/2 adds one feature
    gamers and typists alike would absolutely love. I'm speaking of n-key rollover. The Filco Tenkeyless offers full n-key rollover
    with the use of the PS/2 adapter, which means the price tag is well earned as even the best mechanical keyboards like the ABS M1
    lack this feature even remotely. Without the PS/2 adapter a maximum of any 6 keys pressed simultaniously will register. This is
    simply because USB bandwidth will only recognize 6 keys at a time. It's not that the USB port can not detect more, but USB drivers
    are designed with that limitation to restrict how much of the CPU is used by peripherals.

    For an example I'm going to lay my arm on the keyboard around the WADS: 234qerwt 1cbgfnaxsdvh

    My arm did hit some things like space bar and control, and once my arm settled into place it hit more buttons. If this were to
    be done with just about any other keyboard a maximum of 6 characters would register or it would block every keystroke all together
    and return a null value.

    Das Keyboard III happens to be a new generation of Das Keyboard. The first Das Keyboard and Das Keyboard II were both blank
    keyboards. This means that there were no symbols printed on the keys which makes things difficult for the visual typist. Of course a
    few years ago the idea of mechanical key switches had not been very popular so the keyboard was designed with the typing
    enthusiast/hacker at heart. Very few models ever made it out of Germany, and even today Das Keyboard I & II are hard to find.
    The past is the past, and the review must go on. Catching up to today- Das Keyboard III is a glossy finish keyboard body with
    matte finish keyboard keys. This strange mix might seem like a fingerprint magnet to anyone familiar with reflective finishes,
    but I assure you it is not always the interest of the typist to touch the body of the keyboard. This asthetic is a complete win
    for Das Keyboard III over it's uniform matte finish predecessors (Das I & II). Moving on, Das Keyboard III weighs 10 lbs or
    just under 4.6 kg. This is heavier than the Filco keyboard, but not by much considering the Das III is a full sized 104 key
    keyboard with an extended body which houses two, yes two, USB ports for extra peripherals such as the mouse, a game pad, or USB
    headphones. The Das Keyboard III has 16 key rollover with the use of a PS/2 adapter and 6 key rollover without. It seems that
    Das Keyboard III uses a different method than the Das I & II to prevent ghosting or blocking which does not use diodes. To be
    short diodes are what allow the Filco Tenkeyless to register as many keystrokes simultaniously as there are keys on the keyboard.
    The method used by Das Keyboard III is most likely a new type of keyboard firmware, but hardly justifies the cost which should
    include diodes. If it isn't broke, don't fix it.

    First Impressions: Earlier last week I wrote a review for the ABS M1 Mechanical keyboard, and not much can beat opening a
    true mechanical keyboard for the first time. Das Keyboard, the Filco Tenkeyless, and the ABS M1 all basically came in the
    same kind of standard keyboard box, but there were some note-worthy differences from the Filco model packing over the ABS and
    Das Keyboard III. Filco keyboards are unique to Japan. There is not a large distributor of these keyboards in the USA. The
    Only methods to aquire a Filco keyboard is to come across one in trade, go to japan, or order from Brian @
    http://www.EliteKeyboards.com. The box is riddled with japanese characters, but the english is simple enough to understand.
    Big bold font selling points like: Windows XP/Vista support and ASCII layout are all over this box. In fact it reminds me of
    rather dated PC peripheral box art. Inside the box is layed out much the same as other standard keyboard boxes. The cord
    of the keyboard is separated by cardboard, and this divider keeps the keyboard from moving around in any way. Instead of
    being wrapped in a thin packing foam, the Filco Tenkeyless came complete with a full plastic key cover which is very handy in
    keeping dust out of the keyboard when not in use. This is also a dated touch, but something that definitely did not need to be
    lost in time. As for Das Keyboard III, there is not much to tell. The box art is simply a white to black gradiant texture,
    a picture of they keyboard, and a clean font that says: Das Keyboard III the keyboard that clicks. This approach is clean and
    boring. Well Das III is Das III and not a box, right? The standard keyboard box insides were all there. Das Keyboard cord
    was separated by cardboard, and Das Keyboard was wrapped in thin packing foam all held snugly in place by said cardboard.

    Here are a few pictures I took of the Filco box, the Filco Tenkeyless, an extra key that comes with the Tenkeyless, and
    Das Keyboard III. I couldn't get a picture of Das Keyboard III in the box or of the box art, and the excuse isn't too
    exciting. It's my friend's keyboard, and he throws his boxes away.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Benching: Cherry MX switches and the keyboard construction are what's going to make the difference between the two review
    keyboards. How a key switch is mounted to the back plate can determine a lot. When I reviewed the ABS M1 Mechanical keyboard
    it was obvious that the keys were mounted to the backplate in a way I would consider poor. The keys made a LOUD clacking sound
    which is not the fault of the switches used in the keyboard. Alps Black switches are, on paper, a lot like the Cherry MX browns
    used in the Filco FKBN87M/EB Tenkeyless in this review, so when using the keyboard these keys should be very quiet and give me
    a tactile response when the keystroke is registered before bottoming out. This fact of the Cherry MX browns threw me for a loop,
    and I almost didn't like it. The truth is I'm still not used to it after having the ABS M1 for a week as my daily typer. The
    keys are obviously softer to the touch, which means there is less force required to put the key into travel. There is about 10 g
    less force required to travel the Cherry MX Brown switches than the Alps Black switches in the ABS. Already I could feel the
    difference in switch. Both keys felt similar with respect to the tactile response from each keystroke, but the Filco keyboard
    lacks a sort of hollow feeling I get when pressing the ABS M1 keys. This makes up easily for the lack of key weight by giving
    more value to the individual key stroke. The last point about the Filco Keyboard is simple. It is very quiet. There's no
    real click sound given off when typing. In all the Filco FKBN87M/EB Tenkeyless is a quality build which leaves the mechanical
    Cherry MX brown switches to define the feel of the keyboard which is tactile and non-clicky. Cherry MX blue switches are what
    give Das Keyboard III the right to slap the title of a keyboard that clicks on it's box in a big professional font. Like the
    Filco there is a body to the key unlike the hollow feeling ABS, and the key switches are mounted firmly in place which would
    place the feel of Das Keyboard III entirely up to the Cherry MX Blue switches. The keys have a bit more weight than the Cherry MX
    Browns, and I feel it's about 5g more weight to activate travel. I tested by stacking nickels on a key, and I was right. It took
    one more nickel to cause key travel than on the Cherry MX Brown switches in the Filco. Cherry MX Blue are also advertised as
    having tactile feedback and a click when pressed. As stated the construction of Das Keyboard III fully exemplifies the tactile
    and clicky nature of Cherry MX blue key switches. This combination made the feedback of each keystroke feeling slightly more
    tactile only because of the extra crisp click. When I used ear plugs the tactile response of the Cherry MX browns vs blues didn't
    seem to exist in contrast to when I could hear the clicking sound.


    Final Thoughts: The Filco FKBN87M/EB Tenkeyless and Das Keyboard III mechanical keyboards are definitely solid. A combination of overall
    weight with durable grippy rubber feet kept the board from moving around on just about any surface I tested (wood, aluminum, glass, and
    plastic). Like the ABS M1, both Filco and Das Keyboard cured an annoyance I had when I would type with my previous keyboard. With the
    Saitek Eclipse II I would make a keystroke it would slightly rock my table, causing my mouse to move if I took my hands off of it. This
    was probably because I thought I had to use a lot more effort to register a keystroke. There was no sensation when the keyboard would
    register a key and only the character appearing on the screen would tell me that I could move to the next. In that time I had already
    bottomed out the key with the full weight of my finger. Using the Filco FKBN87M/EB Tenkeyless or Das Keyboard III as a daily typer is
    something I will enjoy.

    If anyone wishes their keyboard had a little more tension in the keys, but would allow for less overall force to type should look into
    the mechanical keyboards. Most mechanical keyboards have an average footprint and standard keyboard layout is a quality I look for rather
    than excessive buttons or strange ergonomic shapes. The practicality of these keyboards are easily put into a catagory of excellence
    since the typing experience has become more enjoyable after repeated days of use. After using three different types of mechanical key
    switch keyboards I doubt I will be buying another standard membrane keyboard, but technology grows. I might end up getting surprised
    some day.

    BiNGE recommends the Filco FKBN87M/EB Tenkeyless and Das Keyboard III to typists and enthusiasts alike! 10/10
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2009
    nflesher87 and Cold Storm say thanks.
  16. DrPepper

    DrPepper The Doctor is in the house

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    DrPepper | Keyboards: Logitech G15 Rev1, Rev2, Random old cheap keyboards | Pointers: MX revolution, Razer Mamba. | Wants: Cherry G80-3000, G19, Razer Lycosa
  17. DrPepper

    DrPepper The Doctor is in the house

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    Razer Mamba Review

    The razer mamba, which is marketed as the best performing mouse on the market costs a premium £94.99.

    The mouse boasts features such as:

    The mouse itself comes in a plastic box and is presented like a museum piece which is wholey unimportant as the box is useless in terms of the pointer's performance.

    The pointer itself is very low profile compared to my MX Revolution and also slightly longer. Weight wise with the battery inside the mouse it is incredibly light and agile and glides very well over a hard mousemat.

    The mouse can be wired or wireless and there is absolutely no input lag whatsoever on wireless even at fairly long distances. The charger also acts as the wireless hub for the mouse and when the mouse is charging the blue lights on it glow bright then dimm and back again until it's fully charged which frankly looks fucking awesome.

    Now onto performance of the mouse. I tested the mouse on Battlefield 2, Empire Total War and Dead Space. As far as comfort goes it is the most comfortable mouse I've used to date. It also has a very good grip on the left and right click as well as the scroll wheel. The scroll wheel is quite stiff but responsive, It's very hard to accidently change weapon but easy enough that if you want to you can.

    My biggest problem with the razer is at high DPI settings 1700 and above it becomes incredibly hard to use. Binge has suggested a few fixes to make it easier to use and to get the most out of it. While playing battlefield 2 at full DPI was unable to play it at all but when I turned the DPI to 1600 I was able to play it normally, The same in the cases of empire total war and dead space although I did notice that turning around in dead space and battlefield 2 was much more fluent than my MX. For those who like incredibly high DPI's this is a good mouse to get. Another feature of this mouse that I greatly appreciate is the 1000hz usb polling. I'l be honest here I don't know what it does but I do like it :D

    I do however have a few issue's with the mouse. First being the driver software, everytime I open it up and click either ok and apply without changing any options it takes ages for it to save to the mouse's onboard memory. Also creating macro's is fairly complicated IMO. Also the price .... Nearly £100 :eek: Jesus Christ I could have got another GTX260 for £20 more. Also compared to the MX the mamba has much less buttons and functions. For example with my MX I can change the volume, take screenshots, change the song wheras the mamba has the basic functions I expect from a mouse, left right click and a back and foward button for browsing.

    All in all the razer mamba is a very good mouse. Its advantages outweigh the disadvantages and if you don't need such features such as media controls, screenshotting etc then the mamba is for you assuming your willing to pay more.
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2009
    Binge says thanks.
  18. Binge

    Binge Overclocking Surrealism

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    Welcome to the club DrPepper, and THANK YOU for your review on the Razor Mamba :toast:
    DrPepper says thanks.
  19. human_error

    human_error

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    I've had my logitech harmony one for a few days now, and i gotta say it's amazing!

    I'll put up a review when my building work is finished and i can test it with my new htpc setup (only used it on 2 tv setups in the house so far).
  20. Binge

    Binge Overclocking Surrealism

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    I've seen some good reviews of that piece. I'm very interested to hear how it performs :)
  21. mrsemi

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    Updated at your request...
    mrsemi| Keyboards:Razer Tarantula| Pointers: Razer Mamba, Kensington Expert Mouse Laser|Game Pads:Logitech G13 Game Pad, Saitek cyborg/pro gamer


    1st, Kensington Expert Mouse Laser.
    I've owned two versions prior this this, same general format. This one is the best by far, no mechanical roll mounts, just a slick surface material that does require cleaning about once every 3 months. Prior versions had to be taken apart completely, about 20 minutes work. This one, you tip the ball out of the top, grab a tissue to wipe the inside out and blow out the area where the laser projects onto the ball. Less than a minute and it's clean.

    The tracking is up there with gaming mice, do to the ability to spin the ball but for gaming the extra two top buttons aren't conveniently placed as you're using the three middle fingers to move the ball and the thumb and pinky to right an left click. If your game doesn't need extra clicks on the mouse this thing is an ergonomists dream and can be a gamers dream as well.

    I use one of these at work, no need to fumble for the mouse, it's always in the same spot and it's taken a lot of fatigue off my wrists over the years. Top knotch, does require a learning curve for movement but when you get it you're plenty fast. It was initially designed for graphics designers and has software extras for that type of work.

    There's four programmable keys, it's does chording (two keys struck together create a separate command) and the scroll wheel is great too. Quick zooms and it's controllable. I've owned two of these, the scroll wheel feel a bit grindy at first but they break in over time.

    Razer Mamba Someone up earlier reviewed this. Supposedly the fastest response time wireless mouse on the face of the planet. As this is only my 2nd gaming mouse I'll say I do like it but it's got one flaw. I grip it with my thumb and the finger next to the pinky and I'm not a sweaty hands person but... This thing feels like those two fingers are sweating profusely on the mouse all the time.

    The DPI is insane, I don't think the largest monitor ever made needs this much. The two buttons up front that change the dpi would be better served in a more convenient location on the mouse to use as alternate mouse buttons. As it is, they're worthless. Though they can be programmed to perform commands, it's almost impossible to reach them with my large hand while the mouse is in hand and my thumb is in the proper location to control the side thumb buttons. I wish they made a jumbo version of this with different textured sides, those two buttons near the scroll wheel and it'd be perfect for me.

    The base characteristics are exceptional, the ability to make it corded is great as well. It is evil looking as well, little devil mouse with lit center eye and great lines.

    Logitech G15 Game Pad and saitek pro gamer cyborg command unit

    I owned the Saitek Cyborg and it's predecessor Pro Gamer (same thing different colors.) and I much prefer the g13 except for one thing. The cyborg has a shift button right where your palm sits making every stroke on it's pad changeable to another command with the bump of the palm.

    The wrist rest on the g13 is more confortable, both are similar in feel otherwise. The thumb pad is what sets the g13 apart from the cyborg. With the g13 it feels like it was made for wasd movement, I don't believe saitek had this in mind when they initially made pro gamer/cyborg.

    Now on saitek's side you could literally make that thumb pad do a different command depending on how far left or right you pushed it. There were adjustable dead zones as well. This is a good thing because the springs are weak and eventually will want to lean one way or the other. Just widen the dead zone and you're golden, otherwise you may find yourself running in circles all day. Another con on the Cyborg is it's a bit difficult to program for a beginner whereas the g13 unit comes pre-programmed with templates for different games and a standard layout which already has wasd programmed into the thumb key. Another difference between the two is the logitech has an option to push down directly on the thumb pad and have it do a keystroke. The last thing about the two is the placement of the thumb keys next to the thumbstick. On the saitek they were directly to the left and soft touch, on the logitech, lower down and not near as convenient. They're emergency or convenience for me on the logitech whereas they were more twitch oriented on the cyborg.

    As far as the buttons go they're a little more clanky on the cyborg than the g13. The g13 takes more getting used to as the top row left and right options are a stretch for the pinky and forefinger but you do get used to it. The bottom 3 buttons of the g13 almost never get used, when they do it's with my thumb. They're hard to get at with the fingers, the saitek, no problem. I've had my g13 a couple months now, no wear on the buttons and the saitek buttons wore down considerably on both owned. Doesn't affect performance, just looks crappy.

    One final note on the g13. The display is quite cool, you can get news sitting there, it's got a timer, it's got a ventrilo setting so you know who's talking in vent. It shows your in game health stats, wealth, etc etc. It's got a programmable backlight so you can change the lcd background color to hundreds of colors, not just 3 based on profile for the backlight on the Cyborg. There's a clock. Oh, might mention.... Ever "accidentaly" clicked on a naughty movie? It'll keep the movie url displayed for you in case you need to write it down even after you hurriedly clicked windows media player off . :eek:

    Razer Tarantula


    I probably shouldn't say much on this, I don't game on it. It has Anti-ghosting capability so no worry if you don't have a game pad, pushing more than one button at once is going to be fine. It's a gloss black, gets dirty easily. The type touch is superb, it's got all the bells and whistles. I shouldn't have bought it, I like the game pads better but... Feel to me is most important on a keyboard with a secondary necessity, it's ability to drink beer. Over time mine has had four to drink and the only problem is an occasional tempermental double c click. There should be more reviews that mention how much beer a keyboard can take.

    Pro tip. Pay the extra for warranty for gaming peripherals if available. I've gotten my use out of it. Headsets break, gaming pads wear out, keyboards drink.

    The programmable keys are on the far left and far right so theoretically with a game pad they'd be much more convenient to use than if you were actually gaming with your hands on the keyboard. I've never used them. Perhaps again, as convenience keys when you're not in the heat of action. You can store your profiles on this if needed.



    Logitech G15 usb headset

    This thing is so cool. I haven't used all the functions but mic folds down to turn on and up to turn off. Red light on the mic tells you it's off. Volume control on the earpieces with a mute button in case you don't trust that other option, dolby on off switch and three programmable buttons for controlling sound and there's six voice morphing tones you can choose from if you want to just simply sound ridiculous or evil. They're hilarious, do some searching or if you really want to hear it pm me I'll show you in vent.

    These seem comparable in sound to the Razer Barracuda HP-1 but different. I went though two Razer Barracuda HP-1 headset snapped twice on my big head, these may do the same but I don't think so. I've read not all games are compatible yet but I have little doubt they're working on it.
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2009
    Binge says thanks.
  22. Binge

    Binge Overclocking Surrealism

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    Member list updated ;) Thanks for firing this thread back up again with so many insightful reviews. Feel free to add pics or any other useful info to that post as it is linked to the peripherals you've listed as using.
  23. Binge

    Binge Overclocking Surrealism

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    Ok I have a couple peripherals I could review, but I would like some feedback here as to which I should review first.

    #1) Madcatz Streetfighter IV Anniversary Tournament Edition USB Arcade-Stick

    #2) Wacom Intuos 4 Large Pen/Drawing Tablet

    These are both very detailed products and I could easily write a lot about these fine electronics.
  24. mrsemi

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    Arcade stick!
  25. Binge

    Binge Overclocking Surrealism

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    Hehehe, authentic Sanwa parts and a beautiful construction... but there's a dark side to this arcade stick! I need more votes people!

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